Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

A garden is only as good as the ground that it's planted in. Discussion forum for the many ways to improve the soil where we plant our gardens.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old July 5, 2007   #16
duajones
Tomatovillian™
 
duajones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Corpus Christi,Texas Z9
Posts: 1,990
Default

interesting reading there Jason. I was told by a local nursery today that my test results were typical for the area, with my ph actually being better than the norm, its usually over 7.5.
duajones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5, 2007   #17
landarc
Tomatovillian™
 
landarc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Left Coasty
Posts: 964
Default

Duane,
It is not practical to think of removing the P from your soil. I do believe that listening to the people that have succeeded in your area is a good point to start. Also, as Ami points out, just because it is there does not mean t is going to affect your plants. Things such as pH and soil type will affect how well a nutrient is used. I would continue in the process if amending and developing your soil, I do like heavily composted manure and green waste as a means of improving soil. If it is truly a heavy clay, I do not like adding sand, as it tends to improves clays ability to clump.
__________________
Lets see...$10 for Worth and $5 for Fusion, man. Tomatoes are expensive!

Bob
landarc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5, 2007   #18
dice
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: PNW
Posts: 4,750
Default

Yeah, adding sand to heavy clay can produce a
soil that is more like concrete than it was before.

You have to add a *lot* of sand to get an effect
like sandy loam, where there is just enough clay
in it to improve the water holding ability of the
sand without also filling all of the air spaces between
sand particles.

(If drainage is an issue, amend with gravel instead
of sand to improve the drainage before adding your
organic amendments.)
__________________
--
alias
dice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5, 2007   #19
amideutch
Tomatovillian™
 
amideutch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Germany 49°26"N 07°36"E
Posts: 4,986
Default

duajones, got out and dusted off a book I've had for a while from Rodale called " Getting the Most from Your Garden". It deals with organic intensive gardening and also breaks down the states into geogrphical areas and they interviewed different gardeners in those areas as to their problems and what they do to solve them. For your area they interviewed a lady from Georgetown, Texas and this is what she had to say.
"The georgetown gardener must contend with an alkaline clay soil that resembles cement when dry and epoxy when wet. The only thing you can do to improve the soil is till in lots of manure, compost, sand and whenever I can get it, seaweed."
So you are on the right track with what you have been doing as also shown with your lower ph than the other folks in your area.
The other thing you can do is in the fall, do you have a fall in Texas,? grow some green manure and till it in before winter. One type of green manure they mention is "Buckwheat". Plant it, let it grow and dig it in. Ami
__________________
Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways,
totally worn out, shouting ‘...Holy Crap .....What a ride!'
amideutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5, 2007   #20
duajones
Tomatovillian™
 
duajones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Corpus Christi,Texas Z9
Posts: 1,990
Default

Seaweed is plentiful right now, just have to drive to the beach to get it. The georgetown lady said it right, it resembles cement when dry and epoxy when wet. Meanwhile, a customer and I were discussing the local soil today and he mentioned using a product called tru gro, claimed that it really improved the compaction of his soil. Claimed it was expensive but works. Im leaning towards doing what I have already done , more compost with maybe the addition of seaweed.
duajones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5, 2007   #21
jdwhitaker
Tomatovillian™
 
jdwhitaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Andrews, Texas
Posts: 104
Default

The tru gro product is expanded shale. It is very expensive in bags, but fairly inexpensive if you can get it in bulk. The TXI website shows the closest place to you to get bulk expanded shale is in Richmond (outside of Houston) at CJF Soil Supermarket. Of course you'll need a pickup to haul the stuff. I've hauled half a cu. yd. in my half ton pickup.

I use it for mixing potting soil, but many folks in the Dallas area claim it works wonders for breaking up clay soil.

http://www.txi.com/products/tru_gro/tru_gro.html
jdwhitaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6, 2007   #22
amideutch
Tomatovillian™
 
amideutch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Germany 49°26"N 07°36"E
Posts: 4,986
Default

Dua, if you have access to seaweed go for it. Ask TomsTrees as he is a seaweed guru. Check out some of his posts on it. Ami
__________________
Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways,
totally worn out, shouting ‘...Holy Crap .....What a ride!'
amideutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6, 2007   #23
feldon30
Tomatovillian™
 
feldon30's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rock Hill, SC
Posts: 5,352
Default

dua lives 4 hours from Houston at the beach (Corpus).
__________________
I've relaunched my gardening website -- TheUnconventionalTomato.com *

*I'm not allowed to post weblinks so you'll have to copy-paste it manually.
feldon30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6, 2007   #24
amideutch
Tomatovillian™
 
amideutch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Germany 49°26"N 07°36"E
Posts: 4,986
Default

I know where Corpus is. I was at Biloxi for 10 months and never saw seaweed there. I guess it depends where you are on the gulf and if any storms may have washed some up on the shore. Ami
__________________
Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways,
totally worn out, shouting ‘...Holy Crap .....What a ride!'
amideutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6, 2007   #25
duajones
Tomatovillian™
 
duajones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Corpus Christi,Texas Z9
Posts: 1,990
Default

There is so much sargassum on the beaches right now that the tourists have complained about it. And I spoke with a local nursery owner about the tru gro product yesterday, and he that he has used it in his garden and that it worked great to loosen up the soil. We didnt discuss price as I am sure they only have it in bags. Will have to do some more research on the product.
duajones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6, 2007   #26
amideutch
Tomatovillian™
 
amideutch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Germany 49°26"N 07°36"E
Posts: 4,986
Default

dua, check out the "Salt in Seaweed Mulch" thread in this forum if you havn't already done so. Ami
__________________
Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways,
totally worn out, shouting ‘...Holy Crap .....What a ride!'
amideutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6, 2007   #27
duajones
Tomatovillian™
 
duajones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Corpus Christi,Texas Z9
Posts: 1,990
Default

good read, thanks for the tip Ami
duajones is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:44 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★