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Old May 15, 2019   #421
MrBig46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xellos99 View Post
I think they are using varieties that were developed in warmer climates like their own.

I estimate this set when night temps were about 40 F.

Attachment 87517

I don't know what varieties they used for their research, maybe someone else did it. But I have only very early and cold-resistant varieties: Several varieties of Sarayev's, Cold Set, Latah, Sasha Altai, Independence day, etc.
Vladimír
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Old September 9, 2019   #422
MuddyBuckets
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Default Polish Dwarf

Very interesting thread. I have a Polish Dwarf, 18" tall, staked in a 1 gallon bucket on my deck that has been productive for the last 2 months producing ~10 perfect tomatoes. Should it be fertilized to stimulate production now?

My question is can I overwinter the PD under lights and keep it producing and/or can I start seeds now and plant up in November/December inside under lights to get production over the winter and plant out in the spring?

Any advice or suggestions appreciated.
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Old November 5, 2019   #423
MrBig46
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My experiment with growing tomatoes in the cold bed continues. The lower part (below ground level) was lined with Feolite bricks, which have heat accumulation during the day and release it into the hotbed area at night. Originally I wanted to paint the bricks with black paint, but I didn't have them, so they are painted brown. I insulated it with polystyrene 2 "thick. The watering will be the same as this year, with a hose with holes (proved to be good).
I also want to reduce heat loss by doubling the glass with 4 mm thick polycarbonate. This, as well as the installation of automatic window opening when the temperature increases, I will realize in early spring. The openers have already been bought and I will have polycarbonate from damaged door panels in the youth home (our youth is a little wilder than we were).
¨ Vladimír
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Last edited by MrBig46; November 5, 2019 at 12:22 PM.
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Old November 5, 2019   #424
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Looks like excellent preparation Vladimir. Your pictures are great. I will watch your progress with interest.
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Old November 6, 2019   #425
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Vladimir, are you replace old soil from this season to another soil from your garden or you prefer to use siderat plants to improove old soil?
If you want to try some more very early tomato varieties I've just got some seeds from several short season Siberian varieties and can send you. If you want them, just PM me.
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Old November 7, 2019   #426
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Andrey, thank you for the offer. I'll send PM. I replace some of the soil with compost.
Vladimír

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Old November 7, 2019   #427
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I will plant only ten plants in this hotbed. This year I had seventeen, and it was a terrible jungle. I lost track of how each plant grows and when I reaped the fruits, I didn't even know which variety it was. For this hotbed I count on varieties which have proven to me in recent years. There are Sarayev Shtambovyi, Sarayev Gruntovyi, Sophie´s choice and Mongolskyi karlik. I sowed the seeds of these varieties (and also the indetrminant Start F1 - the tastiest tomato for me) on October 21st. I transplanted the grown seedlings yesterday. In order that the variety Start F1 is not too high, so I want at a time when the seedlings have seven leaves cut its top and take root. The plant grown from this cuttings should bloom behind the sixth to seventh leaves and be significantly lower.
Yesterday I also planted another eleven shrub varieties (from MMMM 2018) where I want to monitor their growth (when and how they stop growing). The most promising then I put into the smaller hotbed. These are: Grot, Forst Fire, Uralsky Ranyi, Beaveloger Slicer, Red Siberian, Silvery Fir Tree, Yorkbec, Cyril's Choice, Tanana Early, Swoon and Glacier. Other seeds from MMMM 2018 can only be tested in 2021 (more than ten varieties).
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #428
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Seedlings from November sowing slowly but surely grow. Photo is from 3.12., Some of them are placed individually in cups. Otherwise I do not idle and for the hotbed I have prepared a fan and as a solar panel. All 5 V, 5 W. This should help in pollinating tomatoes - as soon as the sun shines, the fan spins and creates the wind needed for the self-pollination.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #429
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I like this fan! I need one for my greenhouse.
Good luck with you projects and happy holidays to you!
KarenO
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #430
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429 posts that I don't have time to go through. So, I'll sum it up...are there any very early determinate varieties with GREAT flavor? Or, do I have to start breeding such, on my own?
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #431
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tormato View Post
429 posts that I don't have time to go through. So, I'll sum it up...are there any very early determinate varieties with GREAT flavor? Or, do I have to start breeding such, on my own?
I will certainly hammer the spelling, but that Bezassandnyi was excellent this year for me. It was good outside, and I had a plant in the GH that was very good. I obtained the seed a few years ago, this year was by far the best tasting.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #432
bower
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I've been working to breed some delicious early determinates, Tormato, but so far the ones close to ready are all blacks... sorry! Unless you want to call some of them "dark pink"
I have a yellow project in the works, but will require a big growout to find a determinate with the desired taste.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #433
Fred Hempel
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Very interesting!

We need more early determinates with flavor. Not an easy combination to make!

I will be looking forward to seeing what you come up with.

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I've been working to breed some delicious early determinates, Tormato, but so far the ones close to ready are all blacks... sorry! Unless you want to call some of them "dark pink"
I have a yellow project in the works, but will require a big growout to find a determinate with the desired taste.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #434
MrBig46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tormato View Post
429 posts that I don't have time to go through. So, I'll sum it up...are there any very early determinate varieties with GREAT flavor? Or, do I have to start breeding such, on my own?
You don't have to read all those pages. I guess you would not find anything new in terms of taste. My goal is not to find the tastiest tomato, but to grow tomatoes in my low-temperature hotbed without any more attendance. The plants grow there reliably, but I still have a problem with flowering and pollination. I write about it and I am waiting for more ideas, it is my "Braistorming". As for taste, I like the first tomatoes and the last ripened ones I eat right now. In August, when I have many tomatoes certainly better taste than the early ones, but I often don't even the taste to eat a tomato.
Vladimír
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #435
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Hello. Interesting thread. I'm new to Tomatoville, but not new to tomatoes. I've been growing a lot of early Russian determinates over the last 10 years trying to extend my tomato season. I've also been trying to see if any match a 16-18" old Soviet dwarf that I brought back with me in the early 90's, unfortunately without its original name. We actually do like it for both flavor and productivity - and the fact that we usually have our first ripe fruit on July 4 following a May 15 transplant date. The most similar variety I found was Yamal, but it was a lot later and not the same when I grew them side by side. Anyway, I'm following for ideas of other compact, early varieties that might be worth growing. Debbie
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