Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating fruit-bearing plants, trees, flowers and ornamental plants.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 17, 2018   #1
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,897
Default Weed or Volunteer Narive Plant - 2018 Edition

I may have planted this one last summer in my herb bed as it is front and center in a large planter. Pay no attention to the sorrel going to seed leaning on the left side of this monster.


Next am I coddling a privet or a weed? The new growth is a very brite greenish yellow, about 3 feet tall in total.


This has square stems. Is this thug growing all over different beds a weed, monarda that is spreading wildly with the rainy weather, or some speedwell that is blooming much later than other varieties, or ???


The grey plant was from a plant exchange. I was told it was invasive, but didn't expect this much so soon. I don't recall the name but would like to know what it is.


- Lisa
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_5583.JPG (188.0 KB, 91 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5584.JPG (185.2 KB, 89 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5587.JPG (163.0 KB, 91 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5586.JPG (184.0 KB, 94 views)

Last edited by greenthumbomaha; June 17, 2018 at 10:08 PM. Reason: first pic is the suspect privot, second the square stemmed plant about to bloom (advance guesses welcome), sorrel + ?
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17, 2018   #2
SueCT
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,082
Default

What is a narive plant?
SueCT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17, 2018   #3
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,897
Default

Please excuse my typo, NATIVE.

Regardless of the terminology, can you identify any plants in the photos?

- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17, 2018   #4
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 11,975
Default

I don't know what the plant is, but I can't stand it when I typo a title and I've done it more than once.

The plant does look familiar though.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17, 2018   #5
SueCT
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,082
Default

You will be able to tell better when it blooms but is the Gray plant Rose Campion? The second picture looks like a weed. The first picture may have something invasive bitterweet if it is a vine, but I am not sure. If it is a vine and you pull some and it has red roots, get it out as soon as possible becuase it is very invasive and difficult to get rid of. If not a vine, then I am not sure.
SueCT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #6
Nattybo!
Tomatovillian™
 
Nattybo!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Maryland
Posts: 275
Default

The plant by the window- I think is a very healthy giant ragweed? The grey one might be dusty miller?
Nattybo! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #7
SueCT
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,082
Default

I think you are raising some very healthy weeds here, lol.
SueCT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #8
Labradors2
Tomatovillian™
 
Labradors2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Ontario
Posts: 3,241
Default

The plant in the second picture may be Agastache, a lovely plant with blue flowers that attract bees. It has a square stem, and if you crush a leaf, it smells of anise. It makes great herb tea.

The silver-leafed plant is probably Artemesia which is indeed rather invasive and better off grown somewhere that you can control it by mowing around it.

Linda
Labradors2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #9
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,897
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Labradors2 View Post
The plant in the second picture may be Agastache, a lovely plant with blue flowers that attract bees. It has a square stem, and if you crush a leaf, it smells of anise. It makes great herb tea.

The silver-leafed plant is probably Artemesia which is indeed rather invasive and better off grown somewhere that you can control it by mowing around it.

Linda



Fingers crossed for Agastache! I've planted the orange hummingbird hybrids but have given up on them being reliably hardy.


Later I'll post a photo of an Artimesia plant that I purchased at a garden club plant sale. The leaves on the purchased plant terminate in a square shape, and have a sharp angular tooth. The nearly dead sample I have of the plant in the photo has more of a rounded end and is smooth. Stay tuned!


- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #10
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 5,770
Default

Ha ha everyone sees a different plant. The silver one looks like one we have called "Snow in Summer". Curse my tongue for saying such a words (since we had the real stuff). It is white flowered and spreading, yes, invasive as all get out. Dandy ground cover for a place you just want foliage/flowers and never intend to put anything else.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #11
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,897
Default

I googled Snow In The Summer, bingo! Mine did not flower, must have been to hot this year.


I need listen to people when they say it is invasive and not fall for a pretty color. Now I have two snowy invasives to have fun with - this and Snow On The Mountain!


I also took a cutting of ribbon grass from another club but that is behaving in the adjacent area that has weed fabric.



- Lisa


new roof every few years

Last edited by greenthumbomaha; June 18, 2018 at 07:21 PM. Reason: We don't have smow in summer but hail is another story. I'll take the hail over snow any time, but it means paying for a new
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #12
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 5,770
Default

BTW two different 'square stem' pics? The first one could be Agastache or Motherwort (Leonuris cardiaca?) or a Speedwell (although not similar to any I know of here, there are a lot of different kinds). All of which have a flower spike which could look similar to the unflowered one in the first square stem pic.

The plant with deeply lobed leaves.. is not any of the labiatiae that I know personally, doesn't look like the same one you pictured first.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #13
Labradors2
Tomatovillian™
 
Labradors2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Ontario
Posts: 3,241
Default

Oh no! I bought ribbon grass at a recent plant sale. It had no label and looked extremely healthy which should have been a warning! Fortunately, I contacted someone "in the know" who warned me about it. Anyone want some Ribbon grass?????

Linda
Labradors2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #14
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,897
Default

The second photo from the top is a close up. You can most readily see the bloom forming on a plant on the left. There is a piece of wood that shows its position in the last photo which is a garden overview. Its invasiveness is demonstrated in the patches of this square stemmed plant to the left, in front of, and to the right of this old wooden post.


I am sure that within the past two years I had planted bee balm from another plant swap in that bed, but the bloom forming is the wrong shape for bee balm.


- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18, 2018   #15
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,897
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Labradors2 View Post
Oh no! I bought ribbon grass at a recent plant sale. It had no label and looked extremely healthy which should have been a warning! Fortunately, I contacted someone "in the know" who warned me about it. Anyone want some Ribbon grass?????

Linda

It would look great for foliage in a pot. It stays short. You can use it in place of using all annuals in a display of clustered pots to save money. Not a bad deal for cheap color.


- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:26 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★