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Old June 30, 2018   #1
pmcgrady
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Default Rose Finn Apple Fingerling

I grew these in a mix from Grand Teton a couple years ago, they were good! So I planted a 50' row of them this year from The Maine Potato Lady. Most of them look like ginger root... What would cause this?



On another note I also won 1st place with them at the county fair for most Freakish Vegatable!




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Old June 30, 2018   #2
rxkeith
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duhhh,

rose finn apple.

they got finns on dem der potatoes.



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Old July 1, 2018   #3
PhilaGardener
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At least you got first prize!



Are you growing in sandy or fluffy loam, or something heavier? I've had fingerlings grow like that and thought it a consequence of my heavy clay soil, but glad to hear other insights.
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Old July 1, 2018   #4
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Soil is what I would call fluffy, and wasn't compacted (easy digging). I had rows of French fingerling, banana, a fingerling mix and magic molly growing next to them and none of them grew like this.
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Old July 1, 2018   #5
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Then those are just downright weird!
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Old July 1, 2018   #6
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I see this quite a bit with potatoes that are not commercial 'standard' types. Usually this is due to environmental factors and the plants were stressed with heat, drought, or something like that.

Commercial types are not usually as susceptible with things like this because they breed against susceptibility for this, as tubers that look like this are usually not deemed marketable. Some older heirloom varieties, especially fingerlings, can look like this.

The trait is called a lack of apical dominance, meaning it sprouts from places other than the growing end of the tuber. Commercial tubers are bred to have apical dominance.
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Old July 2, 2018   #7
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Closer to the original potatoes.
Like the Irish Lumper.
We are so used to seeing modern bred potatoes we forget what the originals looked like.
Irish lumper.
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Old July 2, 2018   #8
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Quote:
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Closer to the original potatoes.
Like the Irish Lumper.
We are so used to seeing modern bred potatoes we forget what the originals looked like.
Irish lumper.
Those are cool!
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Old July 2, 2018   #9
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They are the ones involved in the potato famine I have read.
Worth
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Old July 2, 2018   #10
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Don’t need an Irish Potato Famine in my garden. Just read the National Geographic on that potato, sounds like they don’t taste very good compared to modern day potatoes.
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Old July 2, 2018   #11
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Irish lumpers and several others ( Kerr's Pink comes to mind) are best boiled about half done, then tip 1/2 or more of the water out and finish by steaming them. They taste very very good this way with a nice bit of butter. They are cooked in the skins this way, not peeled, and the potato is fluffy in texture, aka "floury" it's called in GB.
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Old July 2, 2018   #12
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I used 2 - 3 layers of wet newspaper with a couple inches of straw for mulch on these, might have something to do with it. Rest of potatoes were just straw...
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Old July 2, 2018   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imp View Post
Irish lumpers and several others ( Kerr's Pink comes to mind) are best boiled about half done, then tip 1/2 or more of the water out and finish by steaming them. They taste very very good this way with a nice bit of butter. They are cooked in the skins this way, not peeled, and the potato is fluffy in texture, aka "floury" it's called in GB.
I'll trade my lumpers for other lumpers... PM me!

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Old July 2, 2018   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcgrady View Post
I'll trade my lumpers for other lumpers... PM me!


Now that's taking your lumps!
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Old July 4, 2018   #15
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I put a post up here and deleted it the other day.
It was about the great famine and corn laws which I know all too well about.
It is a rabbit hole you can fall into and continue in many subjects and ways.

Maybe I think too much but it bothers the devil out of me.

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