Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion regarding garden diseases, insects and other unwelcome critters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #16
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,271
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xellos99 View Post
That was my initial thought of what is was but looking at the brown areas there is no concentric circles at all. The photos of early and late blight I found show those circles.

Then someone said deficiency and it does look like a couple of deficiency types can look but the strange thing is that I have 5 gardeners delight and 9 sungold.

All 9 sungold were together in a row and all show the symptoms and the GD did not at all. But now the two GD plants that are right next to the Sungold row are showing symptoms the same which points to a spreading habit from one plant to its neighbour.

Its not simple to ID these things at all IMO like some people make out.
It could be to do with the cold, the soil, a fungus, a deficiency, watering.

It has baffled me and the changes I made this year like burying them very deeply, using microrizer, using concentrated chicken manure and taking plants from a neighbour. I will not repeat next year. Will keep it simple next time

Yes, the leaf at the top has interveinal streaking, likely deficiency related. As I mentioned, cold weather or poorly drained or oxygenated soils, pH imbalance, all can affect the uptake of essential nutrients. If you used dolomite lime then you know there is Mg available; if not you can add some. K is the other one that looks similar and which I think is more likely, if it's cold and wet the problem is this affects the uptake. Your chicken manure should have provided plenty.


The main point is that you must remove the bad leaves, because as they go necrotic (presumably from deficiency issue) then the diseases move in to finish it off, and they spread. There are circles on the leaf in your last pic at the bottom, looks classic EB to me.


Growing at high density in a greenhouse, you need to prune regularly not only to improve air flow but also to let the sun warm the ground. If you planted deeply, I agree with BrownRexx this can be an issue and the rooting process will go much faster if the sun is hitting the ground. So remove the lower foliage on your plants up to the first flower cluster. And take away all the afflicted leaves. If you are concerned about defoliating because they are already pruned, I sometimes take just part of a leaf, pinch it back to the point it is healthy and remove the rest later when new leaves are coming on.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #17
xellos99
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: wales uk
Posts: 226
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brownrexx View Post
I don't know what your soil is like but 12in down would be below where my best soil is located so the root ball would be in an area without good soil in my case if I planted that deep
At the end of the season i am going to do a post mortem of where the main root-ball went to see if there is evidence that there was a problem.

I cant dig down to check because roots have formed along the stem now
xellos99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #18
xellos99
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: wales uk
Posts: 226
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
Yes, the leaf at the top has interveinal streaking, likely deficiency related. As I mentioned, cold weather or poorly drained or oxygenated soils, pH imbalance, all can affect the uptake of essential nutrients. If you used dolomite lime then you know there is Mg available; if not you can add some. K is the other one that looks similar and which I think is more likely, if it's cold and wet the problem is this affects the uptake. Your chicken manure should have provided plenty.


The main point is that you must remove the bad leaves, because as they go necrotic (presumably from deficiency issue) then the diseases move in to finish it off, and they spread. There are circles on the leaf in your last pic at the bottom, looks classic EB to me.


Growing at high density in a greenhouse, you need to prune regularly not only to improve air flow but also to let the sun warm the ground. If you planted deeply, I agree with BrownRexx this can be an issue and the rooting process will go much faster if the sun is hitting the ground. So remove the lower foliage on your plants up to the first flower cluster. And take away all the afflicted leaves. If you are concerned about defoliating because they are already pruned, I sometimes take just part of a leaf, pinch it back to the point it is healthy and remove the rest later when new leaves are coming on.

I just cut off the bottom 3 or 4 branches from all plants and it does look way more airy now and like you say the light is hitting the ground much better.
xellos99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #19
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,271
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xellos99 View Post
I just cut off the bottom 3 or 4 branches from all plants and it does look way more airy now and like you say the light is hitting the ground much better.

They're going to love it. I'm not a pruner by nature myself, but learned the hard way growing at high density under cover in a cool climate. Some horrible mess happens if you let the tomatoes grow wild. And they really don't mind leaf pruning a bit. I think that nipping a few leaves also stimulates the plant's immune responses - herbivory response at least, which means more allelopathic stuff to reduce the appeal to bugs as well as pathogens.



I try to avoid those big pruning cuts to the stems, which always becomes a place for rot sooner or later. Leaf pruning once a week is usually enough to stop giant shoots from forming which require me to use cutters dipped in bleach instead of just snapping off the leaf by hand.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #20
edweather
Tomatovillian™
 
edweather's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Southeast GA, USDA 9a, HZ9, Sunset Z28
Posts: 315
Default

Looks like mild Septoria. I had it at the beginning of the season down here, and was trimming foliage, but couldn't stop it. The good news is that I left the recent affected foliage alone, and it didn't advance, and the plants are fine. Of course I'm spraying with Daconil and Copper, but that didn't stop it.
__________________
You'll be surprised what you never have to do if you put it off long enough.
edweather is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #21
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 728
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
I found you this page which, although they are selling fertilizers, has imo the best pictures of tomato leaf deficiency symptoms, along with very clear descriptions that really help...
https://www.haifa-group.com/crop-gui...lant-nutrition
Thank you for this link!
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #22
Heritage
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,246
Default

xellos99,

Great job on the photos! Marginal leaf necrosis is systemic and not fungal. It is possible you also have some secondary fungal problems but the main problem is systemic. This can be caused by excessive fertilizer (fertilizer burn), nutrient deficiencies (which, alone can have many causes), or soil too wet or cold. My first bet (3/2 odds) is the root zone is too cold and/or too wet. My second bet (20/1 odds) is you used a bit much of the chicken manure. My third bet (30/1 odds) would be on a nutrient deficiency.

I am thinking your plants will do better after roots form on the buried stem, closer to the surface, where it is warmer and drier.

Good luck!
Steve
Heritage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #23
xellos99
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: wales uk
Posts: 226
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Heritage View Post
xellos99,

Great job on the photos! Marginal leaf necrosis is systemic and not fungal. It is possible you also have some secondary fungal problems but the main problem is systemic. This can be caused by excessive fertilizer (fertilizer burn), nutrient deficiencies (which, alone can have many causes), or soil too wet or cold. My first bet (3/2 odds) is the root zone is too cold and/or too wet. My second bet (20/1 odds) is you used a bit much of the chicken manure. My third bet (30/1 odds) would be on a nutrient deficiency.

I am thinking your plants will do better after roots form on the buried stem, closer to the surface, where it is warmer and drier.

Good luck!
Steve
Thanks for the reply, luckily day and night temps are improving all the time now so i still believe.

And it kinda helps that i have 7 in pots and 10 more arriving next week that will also go in pots.

I have reserves for the reserves
xellos99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:57 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★