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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #46
Cole_Robbie
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Last summer, my family's garden produced the best-tasting Big Beef I have ever tried. It did not rain at all in June, so they were dry-farmed.

I had Goliath a few years ago, and didn't care for the flavor, but now in hindsight, I think my soil could have used a lot of improvement, and it might taste better in better soil.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #47
peebee
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The 3 hybrids that will always have a place in my garden are Momotaro, Odoriko & Sungold. I'll be trying Brandy Boy for the first time this year.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #48
BruceinGa
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I've grown many over the years and this year I've narrowed it down to 10 Sun Gold (give aways and home use), 50 Cherokee Purple (I know, not Hybrids) and 150 Big Beef.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #49
AKmark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
Last summer, my family's garden produced the best-tasting Big Beef I have ever tried. It did not rain at all in June, so they were dry-farmed.

I had Goliath a few years ago, and didn't care for the flavor, but now in hindsight, I think my soil could have used a lot of improvement, and it might taste better in better soil.
I also tried Goliath 4-5 years ago and thought it was outright bland, it produced a bunch of tomatoes though. Good for practicing a fast ball pitch at best.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #50
Black Krim
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Originally Posted by BigVanVader View Post
Well it certainly intensifies flavor, so I guess if the flavor is good to begin with it would usually be "better" but for SDV it was so intense it was almost bitter. I don't like red tomatoes though so there is that.

I want to try dry farming a few grafted Sweet Ozark Orange this year. They have a very good flavor that I feel could possibly be on the "best tomato ever!" level if I can succeed in intensifying them.
I have little, as in no experience with orange tomatos. BUt when ready all the descriptions on the Tomato Growers web site, I did realize most orange fleshed tomatos have a sweeter flesh. And then there are those that have a zippier impact on the taste buds.

I tend to be eco minded and view watering as a waste of my time....looking for a happy medium where tomatos have adequate water and good production using a watering system where I don't have to stand holding the hose. lol

When reading out on the WWW, a few numbers popped up regarding production weight using drying growing methods. In general both apples and tomatos have about 30% the production by weight compared to those on watering systems. No mention about flavor, keeping qualities, etc.

I can see the value of reducing the cost of water that is paid for certainly but also realize that when production is weight based, the cost of water is well covered by the huge increase in production, by pound.

For me, watering will not be an investment for the apple trees; they will need to be tough and adaptable. The tomatos though leave me wondering about the enhanced flavor...... or not. Seems side by side variety tests will require several seasons to find what I like.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #51
Black Krim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceinGa View Post
I've grown many over the years and this year I've narrowed it down to 10 Sun Gold (give aways and home use), 50 Cherokee Purple (I know, not Hybrids) and 150 Big Beef.

I picked up a recent publication for Tractor Supply Company because the Cherokee Purple feature caught my attention. A long article about the CP and Craig L's role in getting this seed well distributed.

Bet you are among the many fans of the CP.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #52
Black Krim
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Originally Posted by AKmark View Post
I also tried Goliath 4-5 years ago and thought it was outright bland, it produced a bunch of tomatoes though. Good for practicing a fast ball pitch at best.

A couple season ago I picked twice a week for the Community Garden and noticed that the two handful sized boat shaped red tomatos ( variety unkown) were more likely to be damaged during picking. Not clear why. Is it the deep set of the stem, the strong attachment that seems to need a pruner..... totally put me off this shape tomato, a shape that seems to develop in the very large tomatos......just my noobie observation. BUt it has colored my selection of tomatos for sure.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #53
KarenO
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"picking" large tomatoes of any shape by pulling them off the vines is something I would never do.
Most of the time there are lesser ripe fruits in the cluster to remain and pulling off the ripe one risks ruining the cluster stem. I always use a pointed pruner and cut the stem while simultaneously holding the fruit I am removing. Pulling the stem off the fruit risks tearing the skin and fruit with the stem attached keep much better than ones where the stem has been removed on purpose or by accident. For sale, I think stems attached make them look home grown. Cannot pile or stack tomatoes with stems still on though as hard stems will puncture other fruit
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #54
Black Krim
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Originally Posted by KarenO View Post
"picking" large tomatoes of any shape by pulling them off the vines is something I would never do.
Most of the time there are lesser ripe fruits in the cluster to remain and pulling off the ripe one risks ruining the cluster stem. I always use a pointed pruner and cut the stem while simultaneously holding the fruit I am removing. Pulling the stem off the fruit risks tearing the skin and fruit with the stem attached keep much better than ones where the stem has been removed on purpose or by accident. For sale, I think stems attached make them look home grown. Cannot pile or stack tomatoes with stems still on though as hard stems will puncture other fruit
KarenO

Thanks for the details Karen. I'm VERY grateful/ glad to have a tested method of picking.
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Old 6 Days Ago   #55
barbamWY
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Sweet Tangerine from Burpee is pretty good. It produces heavily and medium size fruits are flavorful. A mild taste but still good. Mountain Fresh does well every year and is tasty and Defiant is another I like. Defiant seeds are pretty pricy though and supposed to be disease resistant.
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