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Old March 19, 2018   #16
Nan_PA_6b
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I have little albino everbearing strawberries (alpine, I think) growing in my backyard. The critters don't eat them because they're white, don't look ripe. Tasty.

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Old March 20, 2018   #17
NarnianGarden
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Wow, it is good I begun to research the issue further: I did read on some strawberry sites that
Fragaria virginiana does not cross with Fragaria vesca - nor does Fragaria vesca naturally cross with the common garden strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa. All are too different genetically.

So, no interesting combinations in the foreseeable future - but I just content if they all taste good!
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Old March 20, 2018   #18
greenthumbomaha
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For newbies trying to growing strawberries, I suggest using a regular grocery strawberry as an experiment. I spent a small fortune on buying different seeds only to find they either got a fungus or all dried up one day because they are so small for a long time. Once you have a successful technique is the time to order interesting varieties of seeds.

That is good info to keep the tray shallow and in a water bath. It was fun but not fruitful for me to jump in with 4 seed varieties when I had no idea the sun would wipe out my months of work in one afternoon. Maybe I'll save seed from a strawberry that I buy at the u-pick this summer.

- Lisa
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Old March 20, 2018   #19
Hatgirl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
For newbies trying to growing strawberries, I suggest using a regular grocery strawberry as an experiment. I spent a small fortune on buying different seeds only to find they either got a fungus or all dried up one day because they are so small for a long time. Once you have a successful technique is the time to order interesting varieties of seeds.

That is good info to keep the tray shallow and in a water bath. It was fun but not fruitful for me to jump in with 4 seed varieties when I had no idea the sun would wipe out my months of work in one afternoon. Maybe I'll save seed from a strawberry that I buy at the u-pick this summer.

- Lisa
I tried my first experiment with a half dozen different varieties last year, and used the same seeds this year. And the only thing I did was close over the packet and put it in a a sealed plastic sandwich bag. So the seeds don't need to be used up all at once, they can be saved for at least a year.
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Old March 20, 2018   #20
Hatgirl
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Oh, and just to clarify - I daily lift the pots to see if they need watering (I can tell by how heavy/light they feel) and if they need water I place them in a tray already full of water, and remove them after half an hour.
It seems to be working!
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Old 5 Days Ago   #21
NarnianGarden
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Well, some more varieties are coming this year... Mostly alpines, but I am trying also some garden strawberries (ananassa), and some are already up.
Trying to get musk strawberry seeds to germinate too.

The ones I planted last year are growing well now, some are really lush bushes.
Once you get them large enough they survive easier.

I am just amazed at the ease of the germination and seedlings on my strawberry batch: no hassles of germination, new ones pop up all summer and grow into new bushes without any human involvement.. WHile I am sometimes pulling out my hair follicles trying to get some desired varieties to sprout and grow..
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