Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Have a great invention to help with gardening? Are you the self-reliant type that prefers Building It Yourself vs. buying it? Share and discuss your ideas and projects with other members.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old April 30, 2016   #1
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,987
Default Porch Swing

I want to build a porch swing in an area of our main garden that is always in the shade. This area of the garden isn't used to grow anything other than some mint nearby. It's the perfect area for a porch swing.

I looked online at all the local big box type stores (Home Depot, Sears, Lowes, McCoy's and even Walmart) and found that none of them carry porch swings in-store. Is everything .com now?

I found one that is interesting at https://shop.mccoys.com/outdoors/out...niture/p.35338 I like the price and the fact that it comes ready to finish.

Being that it is the shade 24/7 there's no need for a shaded top (cost too much anyway) and I want to build the support frame to look like the picture below - and also paint the swing and support to match the picture.

What I want to use for the support frame is landscape timbers. Something sort of like this https://www.google.com/search?q=porc...EV1JhNOIMIM%3A

I need to add the picture and then I'll reply more info and questions.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HNI_0049.JPG (82.2 KB, 150 views)
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #2
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,987
Default

I'm not married to any of these ideas, so thoughts, pictures, and ideas are very welcome. We're just in the planning stage.

In the picture above, center and back, you see a corner post for the garden fence - that is the general area where the porch swing will be.

My wife and grandchildren will use this swing a lot. It needs to hold up to growing grandchildren. My wife only weighs 115 pounds, but I weigh 220, so the swing set needs to easily support 350 pounds swinging on it.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #3
imp
Tomatovillian™
 
imp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Just Me
Posts: 3,083
Default

Add something there to repel the 'skeeters, too.

Looks like a nice spot to cool off in. Nice spot,Salt.
imp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #4
ContainerTed
Tomatovillian™
 
ContainerTed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 6a - NE Tennessee
Posts: 3,990
Default

You can also use a kids swing frame. If you do, concrete in the legs. Most of the home setups for kids swings, etc., use 4"X4" pressure treated. But what you're looking for is just to build a couple "letter A" setups and then put in a crosspiece to support the chains for the swing.

We find a few at the local flea markets, mostly built from oak. They run about $75 to $100 for a two seater (when you can find them). They really are easy to build from simple plans if you have a table saw to rip the slats. If you have a kiln nearby that dries hardwoods, they usually sell the samples they use to test the dryness for half price or less.

I built one back in 2006 from kiln dried Cherry wood. Cost was about $30 for the wood and 15 for the hardware. I have a few air hammers that do brads, finishing nails, and framing. Once I got the wood cut, it went together in one afternoon.

Good luck on your project. Give us some pictures when you get it done.
__________________
Ted
________________________
Owner & Operator Of
The Muddy Bucket Farm




ContainerTed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #5
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,219
Default

Okay Salty I did some research on the swing in question.
It says unfinished hardwood.
I looked on line to reassure my self about Cypress which is what it is made out of.

Even though cypress is considered a hardwood it is a softer wood in structure.
The wood from old growth is pretty good at weather resistance but new growth not as much.
But it is a good wood and is far better than some oaks like red oak.
It just so happens I have spent a ton of time doing research on the strength of woods and bolts in the last day or so.
And things like moments of force on angles and so on.

I have to say wood is a bugger to calculate because it isn't all the same due to grain structure and things like knots and so on.
Also the way the grain is turned.
So I cant just say go down and buy a 2X4 and it will hold so and so weight.

As for hardware they have gone over the top in safety as far as what to use.

The hangers are rated at 500 lbs per hanger there are two so it is 1000 pounds total.
Some of the others are de rated big time.
This is because people will be sitting on them.
This is crazy.
Just look on line at home depot for porch swing hangers and you will see what I am talking about.
Law suits rule the world.
Back when you and I were kids they would sell s hooks and J hanger bolts to screw into a 2x4 with dag chains.
Not anymore.
If they do they are rated at like 150 pounds.

The same eye bolts they used to sell now say not rated to support people.
Here is a link to turned wire eye bolt load limits.
A 1/2 turned eye bolt working load limit is 200 pounds.
They also say to never load at an angle.
My how times have changed.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...1gkbhIfAlZlGhA

You say you weight 200 pounds.
If you were sitting in the middle of the swing your weight would be supported by both bolts.
If you were under one of the bolts it would be supporting all of your weight.

Now the part that is weak is the turned eye not the bolt itself.
A 1/2 grade 2 coarse thread bolt has a proof load of around 7800 pounds.
I wish I had my bolt book I left up there.

Now lets get to the wood.
I may or may not would use the landscape timbers to do this.
Reason is what I said earlier.
If you look all of them are the center of a log.
One thing to consider it where the hangers would be at.
It would be at the ends so the support would be stronger there than in the middle.
Theoretically if it would hold up 100 pounds in the middle it would support 200 pounds halfway to the end from the middle me thinks.

Here is a little project I have been working on to lift a 1000 pound weight.
Not finished yet but each square represents 6 inches.
None of the other dimensions are exactly right but I needed to do a drawing to calculate some things.
But it will show you how to support the structure you are thinking of building.
A little over board but I know you have your families safety in mind also.
Worth
Gantry hoist.jpg
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.

Last edited by Worth1; April 30, 2016 at 03:51 PM.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #6
Deborah
Riding The Crazy Train Again
 
Deborah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Marcos, California
Posts: 2,562
Default

Salt, just don't get one foot off the porch swing...
__________________
"The righteous one cares for the needs of his animal". Proverbs 12:10
Deborah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #7
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,987
Default

Worth, that is what I am thinking about. Thank you for all the research. I will ask Jan to read this tomorrow. I would ask her to check it out tonight but she's working till 8 tonight, and then go back at 7 in the morning

She's about to change her availability to 7am-7pm
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #8
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,219
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
Worth, that is what I am thinking about. Thank you for all the research. I will ask Jan to read this tomorrow. I would ask her to check it out tonight but she's working till 8 tonight, and then go back at 7 in the morning

She's about to change her availability to 7am-7pm
Your welcome Salt it just so happens I was doing this yesterday and brushing up and this stuff.

I have to do everything by myself and have to be careful not to get hurt.

One thing you can do to greatly increase the strength of the bent wire type eye bolts is to weld the eye together at the gap.

I am so used to industrial type stuff I cannot believe how cheaply made the stuff it at some of the stores.
As for lifting my 1000 pound load I cant use a forklift in my garage.

I have looked up some stuff for you.
Here is the chain rated at 545 pounds.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-...6440/203958838



Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #9
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,987
Default

I will most likely go with that chain you posted the link to. Jan will like that it is shiny and new. Of course I like the 545# part and the fact that it's not going to rust.

Thinking of chains, we do have a lot of chains around the barn. I need to look at them and see what we've got. They're probably too big. I know two of them are tow chains - my father called them log chains.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #10
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,219
Default

Here are these chain quick links they make all sizes.
This is the small one and it working load limit is 480 pounds.
I think these come in packs of three.
I have screwed myself before and the thing wouldn't fit in the chain or the eye bolt.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Crown-Bol...4684/203001534
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 30, 2016   #11
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,219
Default

I just dug up information from the lowes site on the turned wire type eye bolts.
The 3/8ths is 190 the 1/2 is 300 and the 5/8 was 560 pounds.
Stanly brand.
The forged eye bolts go up into the 2000 pound range or more.
Remember the two bolts that connect to the swing will share the load but they will be at an angle.
So 190 X 4 is 760 divided by 3 is 253.3 X 2 = 506.6 pounds.
Jethro math but it works for me.
This is accommodating the side load on the eye bolts at a 60 degree angle.
So a 3/8 bolt would be fine.
The top eye bolts I think would be fine at 300 pounds each also.
If it were me I would run both chains on both sides to the very top and get rid of almost all of the side load and connect them to the link right under the eye bolt there.
This will also keep the seat from flipping and relieve a ton of stress on the wooden seat.


Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 2016   #12
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,219
Default

While doing yet more looking for swing information I found this video.
Everything you wanted to know about porch swings.
https://youtu.be/07_rnlBezQg
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 2016   #13
matereater
Tomatovillian™
 
matereater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: S.E. Michigan (Livonia)
Posts: 1,058
Default

Cool song Worth !

Salt, you may want to consider using stainless steel hardware to assemble your swing if you can, its expensive but lasts forever especially outdoors.
__________________
Steve

Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult
matereater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 2016   #14
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,987
Default

Worth, uh huh.

Steve, I've looked at some of those too.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 2016   #15
dmforcier
Tomatovillian™
 
dmforcier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 3,691
Default

I wouldn't worry about the loading as much as the lateral stability of the hanger - in other words, the frame. A porch swing can anchor into the ceiling joists. You'll be in a free-standing frame. You may be a subdued swinger, but the kids will be going for height at some point. You'll want a lot stronger frame with a wider leg angle than the one in your original picture.

Might consider tying it to a tree (overhead branch?) for safety.
dmforcier is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:24 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★