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Old May 13, 2016   #1
svalli
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Default First time okra grower

I got some okra seeds from Japan and planted those in March. I kept the plants indoors under LED-lights and these started make buds even they were really tiny. Couple of weeks ago I moved them to heated area of my greenhouse. The buds started to grow, but have not opened yet. Today I noticed that one of the bigger buds had dropped and now it looks like there could be a pod forming.

Is it typical for okra to start flower when the plant is still so small?
Should I cut off the pod and buds, so that the plants would grow in size?

Sari
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Old May 13, 2016   #2
Worth1
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Sari you can cut the pods as they get a little bigger and eat them and it will be fine.
You have to keep cutting the pods or the plant will slow down after awhile and stop producing.

Yep they start to flower pretty fast.
Okra in Finland.

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Old May 13, 2016   #3
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Anything I would write would mirror what Worth replied above. I think okra in Finland is
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Old May 13, 2016   #4
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Hey, Sari. Around here, folks always agree on two things about okra. Keep the temperatures and sunlight max'd out and harvest the pods often to prevent the plants from slowing down like Worth said.

I have Clemson Spineless coming up in the garden right now. We're great fans of southern fried okra. Half and half corn meal and flour batter (add some spices or pepper heat if you want) and then slow fry in a skillet until golden brown. Salt to taste and welcome to heaven from the garden.
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Old May 13, 2016   #5
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What would you guys say is more important for Okra, morning sun or evening sun? Maybe it doesn't make a difference at all. I'm trying to grow Okra here in the PNW and failed last year as I threw my plants out in the garden too early and it was still too cold at night. I'm determined to get okra here as it's not found in the grocery stores except the asian grocery stores...

I'm trying to hold off planting them out this year until the nights are consistently over 50 degrees.

Sorry OP, not trying to hijack!

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Old May 13, 2016   #6
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Al, plant okra when you would plant cantaloupe, cucumber, pumpkin, squash, and watermelon. They like soil temperatures to be between 70 and 80F. Air temps near 90F. All of the above can live in hotter and a little cooler conditions, but the conditions listed are optimal. And lots of sun.
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Old May 14, 2016   #7
svalli
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Thanks for all the replies, it seems that our climate will be challenging to okra. I am planning to grow okra in my greenhouse, because our summer temperatures barely go over 80F. We had two weeks of sun and the greenhouse got really warm during days. For nights I have a heater which keeps the temperature above 50F. Now it will we rainy and cool for quite many days, so I may have to bring the okra back indoors.
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Old May 14, 2016   #8
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Something that might be helpful. I've noticed that Okra doesn't put out a lot of deep roots. Most years I end up pulling the old stalks out by hand and it always looks like the roots had spread out from the stalk and are only down about 2 to 4 inches.

One thing for sure, the plants will go down for the count at the first sign of anything like frost. My brother's favorite thing is that nobody is allowed to say the word frost where the Okra might hear it because the plants will die of fright.
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Old November 17, 2016   #9
Jimbotomateo
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Default Midget okra

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Originally Posted by ContainerTed View Post
Something that might be helpful. I've noticed that Okra doesn't put out a lot of deep roots. Most years I end up pulling the old stalks out by hand and it always looks like the roots had spread out from the stalk and are only down about 2 to 4 inches.

One thing for sure, the plants will go down for the count at the first sign of anything like frost. My brother's favorite thing is that nobody is allowed to say the word frost where the Okra might hear it because the plants will die of fright.
Ted, I'd like to try okra this year. Was looking at this one from Baker creek. Vitrines midget cowhorn. I don't have room for huge plant was wondering if it's good and will it work in 15 gallon container? I only like it prepared fried. Or in seafood gumbo or broiled or pickled.. Mom would fry up okra just for me and sometimes that's I'd eat! We have old friends that moved to Tennessee years ago and say it's the prettiest green place they've ever seen. Hope you get rain soon . Thanks.
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Old November 17, 2016   #10
ContainerTed
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Jimbo, I always choose Clemson Spineless. I've grown it in 18 gallon pots. The real keys to Okra are hot temps and lots of direct sun. I've grown about a dozen different varieties, but kept coming back to Clemson Spineless for taste and production. I've found okra to be a little bit tolerant of dry conditions, but it still needs some water about every three of four days, but not a lot.

I'm not familiar with the variety you listed, but it should perform well for you. Many folks set out plants they start, but I just take a bag of seed from the Co-op and direct sow them. I do this around the middle of May because the seeds will be slow to germinate and dodge those last of the year "soft frosts" that can kill a garden's tender plants. I make sure the "okra row" is in the full sun.

This past season, I had one 40 foot long row and harvested enough to serve my needs and then I gave the rest to my brother who also gives it to his children and grandchildren and their families. The only problem I had this year was keeping enough water on them.

Edited to add: In my 18 gallon pots, I will have about 8 to 12 plants.
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Old November 17, 2016   #11
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Thanks Ted, I'll give it a try. Can I let em sprawl? I've got area where that would work. I've never even seen okra growing. Guess I'll put dozen or so in some 15 gal. Now I gotta find some tiny melons.lol.
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