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Old February 9, 2017   #16
Tracydr
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I've read you can overwinter in cold environments by digging up the roots and putting them in sand in a garage.
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Old February 9, 2017   #17
brownrexx
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I would be doubtful about digging them up successfully since they have long taproots which will likely get damaged.
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Old February 9, 2017   #18
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Tracy is right- they are extremely heavy feeders +2, LOL, and about water. The cooler coastal fogs help make the good crops of these in California.

I seem to recall some being over wintered by cutting back, stuffing some newspapers loosely rolled up and firmly tucked in and around the plants, then a large basket over them. Over that, hay or leaves, and then a secured tarp.

Sort of like over wintering a fig in really cold areas.
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Old February 9, 2017   #19
pmcgrady
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Update
Seeds have been planted for 8 days... no sprouts yet.
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Old February 9, 2017   #20
Hunt-Grow-Cook
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imp View Post
Tracy is right- they are extremely heavy feeders +2, LOL, and about water. The cooler coastal fogs help make the good crops of these in California.

I seem to recall some being over wintered by cutting back, stuffing some newspapers loosely rolled up and firmly tucked in and around the plants, then a large basket over them. Over that, hay or leaves, and then a secured tarp.

Sort of like over wintering a fig in really cold areas.
I'm in northern CA and artichokes are almost invasive in my community garden. They return every spring and the area is littered with them. Not sure if the roots go dormant and send new shoots as the weather warms or if its the thistles falling in the summer and germinating themselves. Regardless "zero" effort is done to get them to overwinter here. And they are the Green Globe variety.
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Old February 9, 2017   #21
Worth1
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Maybe I should try to get them to take over here.
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Old February 9, 2017   #22
MuddyToes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hunt-Grow-Cook View Post
I'm in northern CA and artichokes are almost invasive in my community garden. They return every spring and the area is littered with them. Not sure if the roots go dormant and send new shoots as the weather warms or if its the thistles falling in the summer and germinating themselves. Regardless "zero" effort is done to get them to overwinter here. And they are the Green Globe variety.
Are they very expensive there? My dh just bought some at Walmart last week. They were almost $3 each. I love the taste but they are a delicacy here.

Next year I will try cutting back some foliage before I put down the straw and frost blanket. I think I will be able to revive them.
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Old February 10, 2017   #23
Fritz77
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I love artichokes. It must be a family trait. My dad and I adore them and we both hate cabbage, broccoli and all that stuff. I could say they are probably my second favorite vegetable after…guess what. They are very easy to grow. Plant a scion in the ground and it will spread quickly. Artichokes don’t mind cold weather at all, at least the kind of cold weather we get over here. Hunt-Grow-Cook is right: they are almost invasive. That’s why I got rid of the two plants I had in the garden.
As far as eating/cooking, there are many ways. One of the best for me is eating them raw . That is cleaning an artichoke (pic. #1 shows what to peel and what to cut), disposing of the outer leaves which are way too hard, dipping the softer leaves in extravirgin olive oil+salt+black pepper you have poured and mixed in a small cup, and eating the yellow lower part of the leaves (as you go on they’ll get softer and you can eat more including the heart of the artichoke, my favorite part of it). The next morning you’ll have a sharp, bitter taste in your mouth. Mmm yummy.
Another less “brutal” way to eat them is to cut them pretty thin (pic. # 2) and cook them for not too long in the wok with EV oil, or butter if that matches your taste better, salt and jowl bacon. I prefer them to be crispy and not too soft. This will be a perfect sauce for your pasta. If it’s too delicate for your taste, add a few black olives and/or some of the zillion peppers you pepper growers have. You’ll love it.
For these two purposes, especially the first one, I find violet artichokes to work better. If you plan on stuffing them and cooking them in the oven, I think the round green globe varieties suit better.
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