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Old May 8, 2016   #31
coronabarb
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I need to grow this pepper! And keith, LOL!
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Old May 10, 2016   #32
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I misspoke regarding the origin of Criolla De Cocina. It was the Baker Creek Whole Seed Catalog that states:

Quote:
This small pepper was collected in 1988 in Nicaragua from a farmer.
William Woys Weaver discusses the origin of the indigenous word chiltoma to describe sweet peppers, and hypothesizes that Nicaragua may be home to the earliest sweet peppers, and further states that Criolla De Cocina is one of the most popular chiltomas in that country:

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Nicaraguans of Spanish origin have been cooking with native chiltomas since the establishment of the old cities of Granada and Leon in 1524. In fact, much like the Mexicans, they have preserved a vast array of indigenous varieties, many of which predate Spanish conquest.
So this could very well be an ancient pepper.
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Old May 11, 2016   #33
discoprincess
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Renee's Garden also sells a variety called Suave Habanero. It is supposed to have little to no heat.
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Old September 22, 2016   #34
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Well, I did get some fruit and that means at least a few fresh seeds to get this one restarted.

It is just a good flavor. However, now I'm looking for some of the other "no heat" habaneros mentioned in this thread. If you have some of the following, let's trade. I have some tomatoes that I know you don't have, because I'm just now releasing them.

Aji Dulce I
Aji Dulce II
Criolla de Cocina
Aji Jobito
Arroz Con Pollo
Trinidad Perfume

PM me or post here if you wish to trade.
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Old December 12, 2016   #35
Rena
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I am bumping this thread to give this pepper a 2 thumbs up. It was a wonderful producer and it worked perfect in Jam. I made a Peach Habanero and a Strawberry Habanero Jam that was so yummy. We do mass batches of Jalapeño poppers and use the Jam to dip them in. I highly recommend this pepper. Its not very hot but has a great fruity flavor.
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Old December 13, 2016   #36
coronabarb
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Rena, when you use this to make jam, does it have some heat? Less than jalapeno jelly?
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Old December 13, 2016   #37
Rena
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coronabarb View Post
Rena, when you use this to make jam, does it have some heat? Less than jalapeno jelly?
It has a tiny bit of heat but the fruitiness of the pepper is a delightful addition. I can't say enough about how nice it is to have the fruitless of the habanero but without the mind blowing heat.
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Old December 13, 2016   #38
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When I take the seeds out and roast them on the grill they aren't that hot, and it really brings out that tropical flavor. When I grew Zavory it tasted like a bell pepper to me, but it was a bought plant so it may not have been the real thing.
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Old February 26, 2017   #39
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I 'grew' Zavory's last season. I got the plants in the ground, mulched them, then I had an accident and my garden went to weed Hades. The Zavory's still made some nice, small and sweet little peppers, even though they were surrounded by weeds. I will grow Zavory's in pots this season.
I noticed a new heat less habanero too-Habanada. I would like to try it too.
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