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Old May 3, 2017   #16
JohnJones
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Try the red bells chared on the grill then on the sandwich.
Worth
Sounds good...
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Old May 3, 2017   #17
jillian
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I just couldn't pick one over the other. As far as growing them I find peppers much easier, and not as sensitive to herbicide drift. I lost quite a few tomato plants last season due to it. The peppers that were affected survived and kept producing. Growing more peppers and less tomatoes this year.
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Old May 3, 2017   #18
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Its not about picking one over the other. Thankfully we can have both.
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Old May 3, 2017   #19
SteveP
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Not here they're not they, are a staple.
They come in so many ways and kinds it boggles the mind.
I remember Missouri being a pepper desert when I lived there.
Got slapped by my 3rd grade teacher for putting hot sauce on my lunch.
Lawrence was the name.
Worth
I can believe that region plays a huge part in popularity with Tejas heavy on the chili and Misery locked in tomato sauce.
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Old May 3, 2017   #20
Worth1
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I can believe that region plays a huge part in popularity with Tejas heavy on the chili and Misery locked in tomato sauce.
Mostly our brethren from the south and native of here.
Texas caters quite heavily to Mexican food of all kinds for good reason.
You can't go in any direction without running into many restaurants of all types.
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Old May 3, 2017   #21
Zeedman
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Try the red bells chared on the grill then on the sandwich.
Worth
Wow, that sounds good... I'll have to try that with some ripe pimento peppers.
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Old May 3, 2017   #22
Nematode
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Charred red peppers. On anything. Yum.
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Old May 3, 2017   #23
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A sweet red bell is better.
Worth
You should try White Cloud, fully ripe (orange) and partially dried in strips on a sandwich. It has a really nice flavor.

What about tomato juice? The only truly juicy pepper I know about is Tabasco. We should breed that trait into a giant bell pepper.

I guess you can always add water for the juice, though.
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Old May 3, 2017   #24
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You should try White Cloud, fully ripe (orange) and partially dried in strips on a sandwich. It has a really nice flavor.

What about tomato juice? The only truly juicy pepper I know about is Tabasco. We should breed that trait into a giant bell pepper.

I guess you can always add water for the juice, though.
You want juicy and hot find some manzano or rocoto peppers.
Hard as hell to grow.
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Old May 3, 2017   #25
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@Worth

I tried red Peruvian Rocotos in 2015, but I didn't get any fruit. They were nice-looking plants, though. They say they need a pollinator. I had one, but it didn't help. I think the main obstacle is the days to maturity—maybe the soil I used, too, and my watering method that year. Also, they probably would have done better in a container.

This year, I'm trying an early Rocoto (90 days) called Rocoto Aji Largo. Unfortunately, I only got 5 seeds with my purchase, and I only planted two this year for some reason. Neither has sprouted, yet, but they might still.

I'm guessing the Manzano rocotos might be the juiciest of that type, though. I could easily get seeds for those, but although they're bigger, they're not as hot.

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Old May 3, 2017   #26
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I read that tomatoes have the genes for producing capsaicin, but that they're inactive, or something like that. Does anyone know more about the topic?
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Old May 3, 2017   #27
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@Worth

I tried red Peruvian Rocotos in 2015, but I didn't get any fruit. They were nice-looking plants, though. They say they need a pollinator. I had one, but it didn't help. I think the main obstacle is the days to maturity—maybe the soil I used, too, and my watering method that year. Also, they probably would have done better in a container.

This year, I'm trying an early Rocoto (90 days) called Rocoto Aji Largo. Unfortunately, I only got 5 seeds with my purchase, and I only planted two this year for some reason. Neither has sprouted, yet, but they might still.

I'm guessing the Manzano rocotos might be the juiciest of that type, though. I could easily get seeds for those, but although they're bigger, they're not as hot.
You are going to need to over winter them.
I have found both to be the same all the way around.
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Old May 3, 2017   #28
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I read that tomatoes have the genes for producing capsaicin, but that they're inactive, or something like that. Does anyone know more about the topic?
I'm sure it's true, I have George Clooney genes but they are inactive.
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Old May 3, 2017   #29
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I'm sure it's true, I have George Clooney genes but they are inactive.
I have Marilyn Monroe's genes and I hope to hell the stay inactive.

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