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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #1
HudsonValley
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Default Dwarf tomatillo?

One of my 8 tomatillos makes me wonder if it's a dwarf. All 8 are the same age and were planted out the same day (June 1).

The wee plant on the right in the foreground is loaded with blossoms, but it's smaller in every way -- stem, stalks, leaves, blossoms. The little one is about 3 1/2' tall, while the other 7 are in the 5-5 1/2' range (the raised bed is terraced to accommodate the property's slope). I didn't notice anything different at the seedling stage. Has anyone seen something like this before? Can tomatillos be dwarfs?
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #2
Redbaron
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I had 2 big ones and 2 little ones this year. One of the little ones died, the other is covered with fruit.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #3
mjc
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I've found tomatillios to be more variable than tomatoes...
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #4
HudsonValley
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OK; it's not just me then! It is strange, though, because these were grown from saved seed, and last year's plants were all tall. Maybe I'll save seeds from the little one and see what I get next year...
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Old 1 Week Ago   #5
Darren Abbey
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Tomatilloes are strongly outbreeding, while tomatoes are strongly inbreeding. The consequence is that it will take a lot more time (and numbers of plants each year) to stabilize a new variety.

If the stature is genetic, you are still likely to not get all short plants next year from seed saved from shorty. However, every normal-sized plant will be a carrier for the short trait. Saving seeds from short plants each year will eventually filter out the tall trait.

In tomatoes, the dwarf and micro seedlings germinate a little bit slower than the normal sized plants. If you grow enough seedlings, you might notice the same pattern with your tomatilloes.

I say go for it. One of my projects is trying to stabilize a tomatillo line with inky-black fruit. Not sure how long it will take, but I've got the time.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #6
HudsonValley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Abbey View Post
Tomatilloes are strongly outbreeding, while tomatoes are strongly inbreeding. The consequence is that it will take a lot more time (and numbers of plants each year) to stabilize a new variety.

If the stature is genetic, you are still likely to not get all short plants next year from seed saved from shorty. However, every normal-sized plant will be a carrier for the short trait. Saving seeds from short plants each year will eventually filter out the tall trait.

In tomatoes, the dwarf and micro seedlings germinate a little bit slower than the normal sized plants. If you grow enough seedlings, you might notice the same pattern with your tomatilloes.

I say go for it. One of my projects is trying to stabilize a tomatillo line with inky-black fruit. Not sure how long it will take, but I've got the time.
Thanks for that! I'll definitely save seed, and see what future growouts will bring. I've noticed that dwarf tomatoes germinate more slowly, too, so delayed development will be something I watch for. The little tomatillo started to blossom later than the others... but profusely. It reminds me of a determinate tomato -- it seemed to produce a lot of blossoms all at once (and I wonder if they'll open all at once); the tall tomatillos seem to produce and open their blossoms over time.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #7
Redbaron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HudsonValley View Post
Thanks for that! I'll definitely save seed, and see what future growouts will bring. I've noticed that dwarf tomatoes germinate more slowly, too, so delayed development will be something I watch for. The little tomatillo started to blossom later than the others... but profusely. It reminds me of a determinate tomato -- it seemed to produce a lot of blossoms all at once (and I wonder if they'll open all at once); the tall tomatillos seem to produce and open their blossoms over time.
If it's like mine, then the little one produces all the fruit and the big ones do all the pollinating, but little to no fruit.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #8
HudsonValley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redbaron View Post
If it's like mine, then the little one produces all the fruit and the big ones do all the pollinating, but little to no fruit.
It's still early, but I think mine might be different -- the big ones started to blossom two weeks ago and already have some swollen husks, but the little one only has a few blossoms open and tons of buds. It's weird...
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