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Old August 2, 2010   #1
korney19
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Default Does anybody have an accurate conversion chart, pts/A to TBS/gal?

Looking to convert bigger guns to smaller holsters!

1 pint per acre to Tablespoons per gallon or similar.

Actual amount is a range, 0.7-1.5 pts per acre... need to know an accurate conversion to Tablespoons, though many charts may try to stay in same unit, like area, volume, mass, etc. like 100 sq ft or 1000 sq ft.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
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Old August 3, 2010   #2
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That would be a hard one: I'm assuming you're looking at a chemical application, and ratios like that are meant to inform the applicator once he is familiar with his equipment. Applicators always spray as either a mixture or emulsion with water, knowing how far a gallon of water goes in that equipment: enough water to spray 100 acres of crops needs 70-150 pints of concentrate.

To use those figures in your garden you need to know how far a gallon of water will take you. Suppose your intended patch is 66 ft on a side (4356 sq ft, or 1/10 acre) and you intend to cover it with spray. You'd need (range of .7-1.5 divided by 10) in whatever amount of spray youi will apply.

There are 16oz in a pint
2 TBSP oz, or each TBSP is 1/32 or .03125 pint
3 tsp TBSP or 1 tsp is 1/6 oz.

taking your product at 1 pint/acre (acre is 43560 ft/2) that requires you to use 1/10 pint in your 1/10 acre; thats 1.6 oz, or approximately 3 TBSP + 2 tsp per application, or 11 tsp.

Suppose you want to use 3 gallons of spray mix to treat your 1/10 acre: 11 tsp/ 3 gallons.

Since there is 43560 sq ft/acre, 1 pint/43560 gives you the amount per sq ft. The smallest measurement in most measuring spoons is 1/8 tsp, or 1/768 pint. This would treat a 7-1/2 foot square. But measuring spoons are meant to measure dry quantities like spices which are different than liquid measurements AND THEY ARE NOTORIOUSLY INNACURATE.

This really a long way to say that using concentrated and possibly dangerous agricultural chemicals with inaccurate home and garden equipment is difficult at best, and usually not advised.
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Old August 3, 2010   #3
korney19
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Yes and thanks eyolf for all your calculations. Mostly fungicides or herbicides or ferts.

One problem is I don't have a conventionally shaped garden, but lots of beds & pens. Most are 3x7ft or 3x8ft though, plus some 3ft triangles, I'd have to try adding everything up if we are talking Area.

Then, the sprayers. I have a relatively simple theory but sometimes confusing Ortho Dial N Spray which is more like a hose-end type sprayer but you premix in 4oz increments and then set the dial to 4oz for thicker things. For example, if Daconil is 1TBS/gal, you would add 8TBS and fill the cup up to 32oz and set the dial to 4oz. Or, if the liquid is thin, you can just pour however much you want, set the dial to whatever amount like 1t or 1T or 1oz, and spray away and when done spraying, pour whatever is leftover back into the original container--water would never enter the sprayer cup to contaminate or dillute the contents.

I also have 2 of the Ryobi One+ 18v sprayers that pressurize when switched on. I think they are only 1 gallon capacity. The wand appears to be brass with an adjustible knurled brass tip, and you can snap the wand into the handle and walk around with it as 1 piece, or disengage the wand and use the wand in 1 hand & hold the sprayer in the other hand.

I do remember seeing more than one webpage that listed pints per acre and how many ounces to use per gallon. No calculations were involved. I've also seen many more with complicated fraction math. Most presume that if they are talking Acres, that that defaults to 100 gallons I think, unless otherwise specified.
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Old August 3, 2010   #4
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Pints per acre (volume per surface area) doesnt give you enough information for the concentration of tablespoons per gallon you need. Those are 2 different metrics/ ratios.
In other words, how much of a solution, (the former), doesn't tell you at what concentration to mix the solution (the latter).
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Old August 3, 2010   #5
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Try one of the charts at this site. http://www.convert-me.com/en/

The capacity 1 is where it has Tbs and such. http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/volume

When you fill in any 1 blank and hit the convert button, it fills in ALL the other values. So then you just have to find the value you want.

Great site,
Carol
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Old August 3, 2010   #6
crystals1943
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Try this link http://www.onlineconversion.com/
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Old August 3, 2010   #7
korney19
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Thanks everybody. The best I have found so far is this one but I still have questions with their numbers:

http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0816/

Here's why:

Table 1. Conversion From Rate-Per-Acre to Rate-Per-Gallon For Wettable Powder And Liquid Formulations

It lists Bravo Ultrex at 1.5 lbs/acre and 1TBS/gal.

I looked at the product label and for tomatoes it does call for 1.3 to 1.8 lbs/A, so the 1.5 is the midpoint, so that is fine.

But Bravo ULTREX is 82.5% chlorothalonil. Why would we use 1TBS of 82.5% when Ortho Garden Disease Control or Daconil, both 29.6%, use 2tsp or 1TBS?

If anything, you'd think you'd need LESS of the 82.5% than the 29.6%!

Then, they list Daconil Weather Stik 6F as 1.5 pts/acre.

But the gallon rate is only 1.5 TEASPOONS! Daconil Weather Stik 6F is only 54% chlorothalonil but uses (or converts to) 1.5t/gal, or half of what the 82% formula (ULTREX) calls for.

My product(s) isn't specifically listed in that list but one calls for 0.7 to 1.5pts/A.

Ironically, my other product calls for 0.75 to 1.5 POUNDS/acre! And I called the mfr & the spokesperson said to use 1TBS/gal for light disease pressure and 2TBS for heavy or imminent disease pressure. So I guess 2TBS would be.....1.5LBS/A. I'd equate that the 1TBS/gal would be the same as 0.75lbs/A.

BUT looking back at the Bravo ULTREX, which the chart on the conversion page says 1.5lbs/A uses 1TBS/gal, whereas the 1.5lbs/A from the mfr says 2TBS/gal!


Isn't this all confusing? Is it the powder vs liquid that is confusing me?

Are the chart #s close or accurate at all? Is the nice "VERY noticeably Southern gal" (no offense to anybody) manning (no offense to gals) the phones at the 800# ill-informed or dead on? She spit those #s out without even time to think or look first!

Comments anyone?

P.S. I also have an herbicide I need to know how to convert, it uses 0.5-1 OUNCE per Acre!

Last edited by korney19; August 3, 2010 at 01:50 PM.
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Old August 3, 2010   #8
eyolf
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Korney, I've seen your posts here, and realize YOU aren't a greenhorn. But others might be; that's why I might have seemed a little stern. I apologize if you were offended.

The real key with small handheld equipment is to be very careful about metering your product uniformly.

And that's not easy!

Oz to gallons is great as long as you know, accurately, how many gallons per acre you will spray. Or in your case, maybe oz per bed. I would be very cynical about the Ortho (or any other) hose end unit, especially with pesticides that need to "stick". You might get the correct quantity of product in the area, but not on the plant.

The directions for many products usually suggest spraying with handheld equipment just until the mix is ready to drip from the leaves.

Further looking shows that Daconil, for example, is marketed in various concentrations, dependant on usage. If you're good at math, you can certainly reduce an agricultural- or landscape-use product for your home garden...but if you aren't good at math you should ask someone who is to help.

Or buy the consumer product and follow label directions. For example, Daconil is available to tree services at a 40% concentration of Chlorothalonil, compared to 29% for the home gardener. The home gardener version suggests up tp 7 applications/season at a rate of 2.5 tsp/gallon with a gallon covering 200 sq ft. for tomatoes.

That would be a pint of mix per 3x8 bed, or maybe less if you follow the just-enough-to-cover-the leaves model, or you practice an open spacing model, underplanting with low crops, etc.

If you purchased the commercial Daconil, you'd want to use 29/40 x 2.5tsp, or about 1-3/4 tsp/gallon in the same amount of water over the same area. If the commercial stuff is only available in large quantitites, is it worth it?
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Old August 3, 2010   #9
eyolf
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Sorry, crossed posts.

The Bravo Ultrex is 82% BY WEIGHT. The prepared liquids are 29% (or whatever) BY VOLUME.
In order to calculate ratios accurateley, we would need to know the density of each product in order to calculate the exact amount of active ingredient per unit of volume. Syngenta doesn't divulge that on their websites and I couldn't find any MSDS's that do.

One must conclude that the directions given are accurate. If you buy some Ultra and weigh an accurately measured volume, we can figure it out for you more accurately.
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Old August 9, 2010   #10
dice
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One problem with the conversions that eyolf and Timmah
were getting at is that pints per acre or pounds per acre
does not tell you how much water it is being mixed with
as it is applied. With fertilizers, that is not that big of a deal
because the same pint or pound gets on the acre regardless
of whether your application method mixes it into 100 gallons
or 500 gallons of water. That probably does not work so
well with products like Daconil that need to stay stuck on the
foliage to be effective.
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Old August 15, 2010   #11
korney19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dice View Post
One problem with the conversions that eyolf and Timmah
were getting at is that pints per acre or pounds per acre
does not tell you how much water it is being mixed with
as it is applied. With fertilizers, that is not that big of a deal
because the same pint or pound gets on the acre regardless
of whether your application method mixes it into 100 gallons
or 500 gallons of water. That probably does not work so
well with products like Daconil that need to stay stuck on the
foliage to be effective.

Thanks for the replies everybody!

dice, after reading some/many of these sites, it appears that there is a standard if no specifics are given: they assume 100 gallons per acre unless otherwise specified.

It just gets tricky if you try converting things like 0.5 to 2.0oz per acre into small spaces like a backyard, which may have x number of containers or raised beds.
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Old August 15, 2010   #12
Timmah!
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"...they assume 100 gallons per acre unless otherwise specified."

Ok, I'm gathering that's how much of the product to distribute over a given area; yet the question that still remains with that information is: At what concentration do you mix the active ingredient; I'm not seeing how that information is extrapolated from a bulk application number.
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Old August 15, 2010   #13
korney19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmah! View Post
"...they assume 100 gallons per acre unless otherwise specified."

Ok, I'm gathering that's how much of the product to distribute over a given area; yet the question that still remains with that information is: At what concentration do you mix the active ingredient; I'm not seeing how that information is extrapolated from a bulk application number.

Well, if it was 1.0pts/A, then that would be 1.0pts/100gal; then divide 100gal and 1pt (16oz = 96 teaspoons?), so that would be 96t/100gal, or roughly 1t/gal?
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Old August 15, 2010   #14
dice
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Well, if you have a pint and a half for an acre, mixed into
100 gallons of water, that is 24 US fluid ounces in 100 gallons
of water, or .24 fluid ounces per gallon, or about 1/2 tablespoon
of liquid concentrate per gallon, spread over 100th of an acre.
An acre is 43560 square feet, so 100th of that would be 435.6
square feet. A 20 by 20 foot space would be 400 square feet.

So figure 1/2 tablespoon in a gallon sprayed over a 20 foot by
20 foot space, plus another 5 foot by 7 foot space, if the
recommendation was to use 1.5 pints per acre.

I usually run a tape measure down beside a garden space in
two directions to get a rectangular area measure, like "10'x20'
for 200 square feet", and I ignore any "missing" areas in there
that do not have a plant, or some other kind of plant, a patch
of lawn, and so on. For convenience, I assume that the "extra"
space makes up for overspray that misses the plants and
garden entirely, gets picked up by a breeze and ends up on
nearby trees or shrubs, and so on. Rough measures are
usually good enough here, and all areas are rectangular for
the purposes of estimating how much stuff to use, even if
their actual shapes look like a map of the holes on a golf
course.
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Old August 15, 2010   #15
Timmah!
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Ok, 100 gallons is the water solvent; lost track of the solute metric from the op.
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