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Old June 16, 2012   #16
Liz
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Default Good season.....so far

By far, this is the best our humble crop of tomatoes have done in years! Yes to adequate rain.. And I think also night time temps have been lower. Diseases and bugs are manageable, my biggest complaint is that the birds have taken notice of the nice crop. Dagnabbit!!!
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Old June 16, 2012   #17
meadowyck
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liz, I would suggest bird netting, but then you would have to be on the watch for those that get caught so on second thought I don't have a suggestion after all. Sorry about that they have found your wonderful maters.
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Old June 16, 2012   #18
Liz
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Default birds 'n tomatoes

LOL ! Of course the birds found my 'maters, I have 4 birdfeeders scattered in the yard!!
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Old June 18, 2012   #19
Mikedog
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hey Liz. I hated catching birds also so now I wrap the whole cage in an old bed sheet or loosley drape cloth over clusters. Of course the smart ones figure it out but it saves a few for us.
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Old January 28, 2013   #20
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I get around hardening off seedlings by starting seeds exposed to the elements. The rules are different here in Miami, like our growing season is the winter.
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Old March 4, 2013   #21
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Thank you for sharing this. Being new to gardening, it was very informative. Now I have to find Carolyn's book
I tried growing two beefsteak, store bought plants last summer and they both had the leaves roll upward and seemed to get extra thick. Still don't know what it was, but they only produced 2 small tomatoes, all of the other blossoms bloomed and fell off. I gave up on them and threw them in the trash This year, beginning of Jan. I started my plants from seeds, Jaune Flamme, Delicious and Pomodoro. I started my seeds outside as I don't have room inside. They are all around 4" tall with their 4th set of leaves coming out. They all look pretty healthy which is exciting. I just might have a bit of green in my thumbs afterall. (praying)
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Old July 2, 2013   #22
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I read the descriptions of each the disease then did a image search on the web of each. They all pretty much look the same. It is hard to tell one from the other. Some pictures describing the differences in each one would be nice if someone knows that kind of info. Great article tho. Thanks for posting
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Old July 2, 2013   #23
linzelu100
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This is very helpful to me, thanks
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Old July 5, 2013   #24
mari.beth
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This is a fabulous article. Thank you for sharing it!!

We have had an incredibly wet spring /summer so far. I am growing 15 tomato plants in raised beds. In one bed, the Amish Paste plant started out with what I think is Septoria Leaf Spot or blight (they do look similar as someone else commented above) and now several other plants are infected. In the other bed, the only hybrid I am growing, Sweet 100 (I think that is the name) started with something that looks slightly different (but still like any one of the diseases mentioned above - or it may just be because the leaves look very different). I also noticed what might be Blossom End Rot on a couple of tiny green Black Krims. I had some Greencure left over from last year when I grew tomato plants in 5-gallon buckets and had major fungus and BER problems. I sprayed the plants with Greencure today, but I just ordered a copper solution based on several things I have read tonight. I was wondering how long between treatments I should wait and if I should continue to vary the two products or just stick with the copper solution. Also, I have not fertilized for a couple of weeks and was planning on putting down some Tomatotone and adding another layer of straw mulch this week. I wonder if I should wait on doing those things. I have one Italian Heirloom that looks like it will be ripe in a few days and would hate to lose most of my other plants before I get to eat some tasty heirloom tomatoes!!! This is my first year with raised beds and only 3rd year growing tomatoes - I am frustrated that I am battling plant diseases and probably doing things all wrong!!! Any advice would be appreciated!
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Old January 1, 2017   #25
rick9748
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How do you avoid root knot nematodes if you are planting in the same location?I am having a major problem with them.
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Old January 1, 2017   #26
Garf
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The only method I know of is soil sterilization, but that is a nasty process. I have gone to containers as a last resort.
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Old July 12, 2017   #27
rick9748
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Default Best methods and practices for heirlooms

Did not know where this would exactly fit.
Would like for us to share our best methods and practices for growing heirloom tomatoes.I have seen several commercial heirloom operations growing Cherokee Purple and others with which appears to be little trouble.Called two of the operations and asked for advice but no luck.They have acres of heirlooms and great production.
Don't really want to hear criticism of their methods would love to hear what keeps your heirlooms healthy and productive.What are you doing that WORKS.
Thanks
Rick
central South Carolina

PS; Would really like new knowledge and methods.Here in South Carolina constantly fighting some disease.Enviroment; 95+s daily thunder storms 100% humidity.
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