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Old January 14, 2017   #1
habitat_gardener
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Default radish greens!

I made a new discovery today: radish greens!

I picked some Groundhog daikon and Green Meat radishes at the community garden, and the greens were so beautiful (and surprisingly mild) that we added them to some leftover mushroom risotto. The greens are so good that they'd be great raw in a salad, used the same way as arugula. The leaves have a smooth surface, unlike turnip greens, which are a little sandpapery.

We've been struggling to find a way to like turnip greens -- they are bitter and strong unless blanched, but once they're blanched, they last only a few days. But based on today's experience, I may just give up trying to like turnips and grow daikon instead as my winter crop. (Does anyone have any great vegan recipes for turnips?)
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Old January 15, 2017   #2
LDiane
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There are radishes specially bred for the leaves - Hong Vit is one.
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Old January 15, 2017   #3
bower
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Radish leaves make great pesto too!

Turnip greens are certainly a different taste. They are traditional food here, served cooked, on the side with pease pudding and a dollop of mustard, I would like that, and it can be vegan if you make it that way (just substitute for butter, and no salt beef or ham on the side).

Here's a pease pudding recipe:
https://twofatvegetarians.wordpress....pease-pudding/
We make ours in a pudding bag, just put yellow split peas in the bag an immerse the lot in boiling water for an indefinite time, until completely cooked. Afterwards mashed with salt and pepper and butter (or substitute a little of your preferred oil) until smooth; serve hot or cold with mustard or a sweet pickle or condiment. You can cook vegetables in the same pot, when the pease are nearly done.

My mom has become addicted to pease pudding with wasabi!

Turnips themselves, I just grow the Hakurei which are mild, and eat them raw.
Rutabagas, we used to boil with carrots and potatoes.... and serve with pease pudding. The rutabaga (which we call 'turnip' here) is often mashed with butter salt and pepper too.
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Old January 16, 2017   #4
Sun City Linda
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Great timing! I was just admiring some radish greens as I was preparing some radishes from the garden.
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Old January 16, 2017   #5
oakley
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Oooh, peas pudding. I've set the bag right into my pot while making stock. Veg or chicken stock.
Turnips can be added to chick peas and lentils in a hummus. Or in a lentil, chick pea curry.

And sliced and eaten fresh as a 'chip'. (for the hummus). In salads grated with slices of apple, carrot, cucumber and other radishes.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/30/di...-appetite.html

Lots of great crops to grow along with turnips like the watermelon radish (a personal favorite)...
I make a quick pickle using all. Sliced thin for a chip, or matchstick for a slaw.
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Old January 16, 2017   #6
bower
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How would you describe the taste of watermelon radish? Is it really sweet ie without any peppery-ness? I've been eyeing that one with interest.
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Old January 16, 2017   #7
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Sweet and crisp. Likes the cold and actually gets sweeter the larger it gets. I think perfect for Newfoundland. Does have some pepper but that is all in the skin. Mild pepper if sliced and a biggie. Nothing in the radish family compares to the black radish. I love it but it is the most pungent. Has that 'barnyard' earthy aroma. In a fresh pickle it will clear a room. I keep those separate and only fresh. (peeled fine) but wow, hard to get past the garbage can earthy scent.
I have many varieties of root veg i want to try. I dug in some fish bodies and composted shellfish in the old potato beds. With the usual kitchen scraps. (the NFLD place)

-let me know if you have a hard time finding varieties and i'll bring any up your way.
Or anything you need. Even Masstown in NovaScotia has some good selections.
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Old January 16, 2017   #8
bower
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Cool, thanks for the info!
I did grow the black radish once - the year my son got married - he is so into pungent things I am not as much. The black is pretty amazing.
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Old January 17, 2017   #9
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For vegan sweat them down in a skillet with salt pepper garlic and EVO or any other fine oil you may like.
To offset the strong so called strong bitter flavor wash them down with a good stout ale or porter.
Same goes for bitter black oil cured olives.
Most folks think they are horrible but I love them paired with other food or the right ale.
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Old January 17, 2017   #10
oakley
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I don't find any of them bitter. More peppery/earthy/spicy... and only the black radish. The rest are mildly sweet with a peppery skin.
Mellow and tamed pepper spice when steamed or sauteed.
Bitter i think of some of the greens like escarole that immediately turn sweet when tossed on some heat.
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