Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion regarding garden diseases, insects and other unwelcome critters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 14, 2017   #1
Southbound
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Nashville TN
Posts: 17
Default Wilt, Blight, What is this???

I have searched through the pictures and posts and just seem to get more and more confused. I can't determine whether it is early blight, fusarium wilt , spotted wilt virus, etc. etc. etc. Could someone take a look at these pictures and give me a place to start? I have had a few aphids, but they seem to be backing off., so I haven't sprayed safer soap in a couple of weeks. I try to keep them watered, but not overwatered, I have a good many tomatoes coming on-but note the picture of one I found today with the black underside. Any and all suggestions much appreciated. THANKS!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 002.jpg (411.0 KB, 203 views)
File Type: jpg 003.jpg (429.2 KB, 201 views)
File Type: jpg 004.jpg (384.1 KB, 205 views)
File Type: jpg 005.jpg (376.5 KB, 204 views)
File Type: jpg 006.jpg (241.7 KB, 200 views)
File Type: jpg 007.jpg (394.1 KB, 201 views)
File Type: jpg 008.jpg (527.7 KB, 199 views)
Southbound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 14, 2017   #2
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,156
Default

The tomato has blossom-end rot BER.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is online now   Reply With Quote
Old June 14, 2017   #3
Nematode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 1,488
Default

Leaves look like early blight, although I don't see the concentric rings in the lesions.
Tomato looks like blossom end rot.

Are you using a fungicide? This would help the blight, but not the BER.
Nematode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 14, 2017   #4
Southbound
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Nashville TN
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nematode View Post
Leaves look like early blight, although I don't see the concentric rings in the lesions.
Tomato looks like blossom end rot.

Are you using a fungicide? This would help the blight, but not the BER.
I have only used Oxidate one time this year. Should I do it more? BER-should I maybe dress the plants with epsom salts? I planted them with a little of that back in April when I planted them. What kind of fungicide would y'all suggest? I try to go organic as much as possible.
Southbound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 14, 2017   #5
Nematode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 1,488
Default

If it's early blight someone else can chime in here.....

Copper octanoate
Daconil.
Neither are organic.
It's almost too late once symptoms appear. The home garden remedies are preventative not curative.

BER is usually a calcium deficiency or watering problem. Too wet, or uneven.
Nematode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 14, 2017   #6
ginger2778
Florida TAG™ Coordinator
 
ginger2778's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Plantation, Florida zone 10
Posts: 7,099
Default

Very severe early blight. The tomato has BER, the plant will outgrow that. Better get the copper spray going as soon as you trim off and bag up mist of those infected leaves. Use the WEAKEST recommended dose of copper in your spray, it will be plenty strong enough. Too strong will stunt new leaf growth and put you back 3 weeks delayed. If it looks blue on your leaves it is too strong. Be thorough under and over the leaves and all of the stem down to the soil line. Then every 7 days repeat as a preventive.

Epsom salts is magnesium sulfate, it doesn't have any calcium in it, it therefore won't help the BER. You can put in calcium nitrate(Calcinit), or just evenly water and wait for the plant to grow out of it, which it will.
__________________
Marsha

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.”
― Neil deGrasse Tyson
ginger2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 15, 2017   #7
Southbound
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Nashville TN
Posts: 17
Default

Thanks very much. I appreciate it.
Southbound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 19, 2017   #8
gorbelly
Tomatovillian™
 
gorbelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 955
Default

Looks like it could be drought stress, too. Sometimes, it's hard to tell apart old drought stress from EB.
gorbelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 19, 2017   #9
RayR
Tomatovillian™
 
RayR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Cheektowaga, NY
Posts: 2,352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gorbelly View Post
Looks like it could be drought stress, too. Sometimes, it's hard to tell apart old drought stress from EB.
I agree, a lot of that looks like drought stress. If there's EB in there, I can't see any of the lesions up close enough to say.
RayR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 19, 2017   #10
Southbound
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Nashville TN
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RayR View Post
I agree, a lot of that looks like drought stress. If there's EB in there, I can't see any of the lesions up close enough to say.
I don't know, we've had a good bit of rain lately, almost too wet really. Thank you, though, I guess that is something to keep in mind. Thanks!
Southbound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 19, 2017   #11
gorbelly
Tomatovillian™
 
gorbelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 955
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nematode View Post
Copper octanoate
Daconil.
Neither are organic.
Copper octanoate formulations are frequently OMRI listed, so it can be organic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
Better get the copper spray going as soon as you trim off and bag up mist of those infected leaves. Use the WEAKEST recommended dose of copper in your spray, it will be plenty strong enough. Too strong will stunt new leaf growth and put you back 3 weeks delayed. If it looks blue on your leaves it is too strongl.
I use copper octanoate at the standard recommended dilution and there is always a bluish residue on my leaves, and I have never had problems with stunting of any kind on my tomatoes until I had an herbicide drift incident from my neighbor this year. I know it was herbicide that was the problem because it also took down my peas and my neighbor's hawthorn bush, neither of which were sprayed with any copper at all.

I suspect it matters what kind of copper you use.
gorbelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 19, 2017   #12
RayR
Tomatovillian™
 
RayR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Cheektowaga, NY
Posts: 2,352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Southbound View Post
I don't know, we've had a good bit of rain lately, almost too wet really. Thank you, though, I guess that is something to keep in mind. Thanks!
Well...if it's Early Blight there will be a well defined concentric circle pattern (I'm not talking about a perfect circle by any means) in the brown lesions.
If that symptom is not there then then it could be a similar looking fungal pathogen like Tomato Leaf Mold (Fulvia Fulva). If it is a fungal pathogen then there should be the signs of sporulation, fuzzy growth or tiny structures growing on the the bottom of the leaf within the brown lesion and you may need magnification to see it.

Drought Stress symptoms are not limited to a lack of water in the soil, for the plant to move water and nutrients up from the roots requires water vapor to exit the leaves through transpiration. Things that can hinder water movement and normal transpiration are overly wet soil or very high humidity or both. The reduction of movement of water and nutrients in the plant. especially like the less mobile Calcium would account for the severe BER on the fruit.
Sometimes you've got to look at all the nitty gritty details of what's going on with the plant, the environmental conditions and your own cultural practices to determine what the problem or problems are. Sometimes you can have more than one problem at the same time.
RayR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 20, 2017   #13
gorbelly
Tomatovillian™
 
gorbelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 955
Default

Are you growing in containers?

Also, did you get that week of hot, dry weather we got up here?
gorbelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 20, 2017   #14
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 718
Default

Looks like some are early blight. I assume those are piles of discarded leafs, so probably not so bad overall. The first pictures look like old leaves. They just get yellow with age usually because they don't have exposure to light and the plants just cuts them off, and then they get moldy because they're dead.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 20, 2017   #15
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,049
Default

It also looks like you may have some gray mold going on there also. The copper spray will help with that or the bleach spray which I prefer then follow up with a copper spray.

Bill
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:42 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★