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Old July 4, 2017   #1
oakley
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Default Atlantic Canada, Newfoundland, NL

I am currently visiting Newfoundland Canada where we have a
vacation home...planning a garden for the future years.

Putting a list together what does well here as far as perennials...
Bower mentioned lovage so that is a must grow.

I have lots of chives put in years ago. I have garlic chives seed.
Just harvested rhubarb.

Makamik flowering crab Apple planted a dozen years ago is about
To bloom as well as the lupine...elder lilac big grand bush is forming
Buds. (Example how far behind we are here).

65-70 high, 50-55 low. Perfect weather right now.

I could use a good mail order source for seed and bare-root plants.

Asparagus?

I have all the wild berries and a gooseberry...maybe some hybrids?

Last edited by oakley; July 5, 2017 at 09:47 AM. Reason: updating
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Old July 4, 2017   #2
NewWestGardener
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What about Tayberries? Said to be a hardy hybrid of black berry and raspberry.

It is great for fresh eating, no hard core, no tough seeds, mild and pleasant. I usually like strong flavored fruit, but the mild taste of this one is surprisingly good. Some small thorns, not tough as wild blackberry.
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Old July 4, 2017   #3
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Do you care for horseradish? Very easy to plant and forget.

- Lisa
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Old July 4, 2017   #4
bower
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Asparagus can be done here. Need to get crowns in spring though - Vesey's in PEI does mail order, but you can probably pick them up at Gaze seed in St. John's as well.
Fruit: Strawberries are good. Currants are an excellent fruit crop here, maybe the most reliable. Even years we had no blueberries, lots of currants red and black. As long as moose don't eat the bushes. Mint is a good companion under gooseberries, it seems to repel the nasty little moths that eat all their leaves in some situations/years. Still looking for a moose repellent. Dogberries make great jelly. I think the best plan for fruit is to have a diversity of stuff, some may fail but hopefully not everything in the same year.
Horseradish and sunchokes are good.

Seasoning herbs: sage, thyme, lovage... lemon balm is another one.
Alliums: Egyptian onions, perennial green onions, leeks are making a perennial patch for me here. Shallots didn't do so well, but maybe my fault, bad timing dividing them. The chives in my garden came from my grandmother originally, up in Bonavista Bay.
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Old July 5, 2017   #5
salix
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Sorrel, tarragon, skirret should do well for you, as well as the others mentioned above. As for ornamentals, day lilies, siberian iris, own root roses, hardy geraniums and peonies should give you colour and fragrance. (Up until this past winter, I would have added quite a few more - dianthus, nepeta, delphiniums, campanula etc. as being iron hardy but did lose some this year.)
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Old July 5, 2017   #6
Nematode
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Lichen
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Old July 5, 2017   #7
oakley
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Thank you!!

Lots to research...should have internet today.

We only have an acre but wild berry canes and nettles have taken
over. Weather has been gorgeous and more to come. Should have
It under control in a few days and start planning....hired a couple
Adorable young boys to hack at it.
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Old July 5, 2017   #8
Nematode
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Oakley,
Your signature info is bound to be confusing, you will be getting 5a New York advice even though you are in Newfoundland.....
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Old July 5, 2017   #9
oakley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nematode View Post
Oakley,
Your signature info is bound to be confusing, you will be getting 5a New York advice even though you are in Newfoundland.....
I up-dated my intro post.

Yes, I understand the confusion as I always look at a posters location when reading
a new thread. (I was posting on my phone up until just 1/2 hour ago when service was
turned on finally)...someone had 'borrowed' our cable line during the winter.

I have no garden here to speak of but have plans for a greenhouse, etc. This location
is not relevant 11 months of the year. The altitude of the Catskill farm, where I have
had my main garden for 20 years, is very similar climate to the NorthAtlantic. Often a
few weeks behind here in Newfoundland, yet often identical depending on the year.
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Old July 5, 2017   #10
ddsack
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Quote:
Alliums: Egyptian onions, perennial green onions, leeks are making a perennial patch for me here. Shallots didn't do so well, but maybe my fault, bad timing dividing them. The chives in my garden came from my grandmother originally, up in Bonavista Bay.
Bower, how are you handling your leeks? Is it a special variety or are you just letting some go to seed naturally? I can never use up my storage leeks before they deteriorate, so would be interested in having a bed with various ages to pick throughout the season, if that is possible.

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Old July 5, 2017   #11
oakley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddsack View Post
Bower, how are you handling your leeks? Is it a special variety or are you just letting some go to seed naturally? I can never use up my storage leeks before they deteriorate, so would be interested in having a bed with various ages to pick throughout the season, if that is possible.

Yes, that is of interest. I picked up leeks at Masstown market on the way up...(NovaScotia)
Made leek-greens/veg stock within hours of arrival. And started some SeaSalt
as well once the wood stove was up and going...
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Old July 5, 2017   #12
bower
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The leeks are American Flag. This is the saga of my leek perennial patch experiment!
My friend initially grew them from seed and passed on some extra seedlings. I ended up planting them in a big fishtub and moving them into the greenhouse for the winter, where I cut rather than pulling them and ate them, and then in spring transplanted the stumps (which regrew) outdoors the next summer, where they set seed and also made some 'pearls' that is younguns in the form of a wee bulb on the side after flowers have been cut or finished. I started another batch from the seed, and voila, I had a Swiss Family Robinson of leeks in the garden, of different ages and stages. The idea was that some would be setting seed each year while others would be for growing and eating. I personally don't feel the need to harvest by pulling since it is a home garden not a market garden... I am just as pleased to cut them and let them regrow. They seem to like it.

They are persisting with surprisingly little care in a bed with other rambunctious perennials, but like all alliums they cannot grow big and flourish without being weeded and divided/fed/ given space. So far this year I have weeded and top dressed them but haven't separated any. Still they can be eaten at any stage, and it is handy to have the patch so I can divide and grow some big ones any spring without the adventure of starting in February under lights. Also good to have seed setting each year so no buying seeds - but with the caveat they set seed very late some years (weather and leeks being what they are).
One last thing about leeks, they make an excellent crop for over winter in the greenhouse, and really keep growing when nothing else would. I really enjoyed my winter leeks. And that reminds me, to steal some from the garden for next winter.
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Old July 5, 2017   #13
GrowingCoastal
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Bower, it has been so long that I have had my perma-leeks that I don't know what varieties they are. One's flowers are white and the other's are more pinkish. If the flower scapes are cut off they make larger bulbs. I let mine go wild in the garden for the sake of feeding hummingbirds who love the flowers. Bees too. I also pot some up for winter eating.

Last edited by GrowingCoastal; July 5, 2017 at 12:58 PM. Reason: memory
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Old July 5, 2017   #14
NewWestGardener
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Oh, I wanted to do a "variety highlight" on... a dandelion!
If you like chicory, something a bit bitter, you've got to try this one. I bought the original seed from Johnny's 4 years ago, named 'Clio". Italian dandelion. Then saved seeds and planted more later. A biannual. Blooming blue flowers in my garden now.
The best part of this variety is its big upright tender green leaves, 1-2 feet long, with sweet white ribs. They stay tender all the way. The leaves stay upright, so no dirt gets in between. They pop up early in the spring, from the last year's roots/stems. No tender loving care needed whatsoever, other than directly sowing the seeds in the soil in the fall. I like them better than lettuce, as they have more texture.
I misplaced my seeds last year, otherwise, I would have offered them in the seed exchange. I will be saving lots of seeds this year.
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Old July 5, 2017   #15
oakley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewWestGardener View Post
Oh, I wanted to do a "variety highlight" on... a dandelion!
If you like chicory, something a bit bitter, you've got to try this one. I bought the original seed from Johnny's 4 years ago, named 'Clio". Italian dandelion. Then saved seeds and planted more later. A biannual. Blooming blue flowers in my garden now.
The best part of this variety is its big upright tender green leaves, 1-2 feet long, with sweet white ribs. They stay tender all the way. The leaves stay upright, so no dirt gets in between. They pop up early in the spring, from the last year's roots/stems. No tender loving care needed whatsoever, other than directly sowing the seeds in the soil in the fall. I like them better than lettuce, as they have more texture.
I misplaced my seeds last year, otherwise, I would have offered them in the seed exchange. I will be saving lots of seeds this year.
!!!
Just put that in my Johnny's cart...

Dandelions are right behind the nettles and berry canes all over the yard. They do well
here, and everywhere. Blue flowers? cool.
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