Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating herbs.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old July 10, 2015   #1
habitat_gardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: SF Bay Area, California
Posts: 2,327
Default secrets of growing cilantro?

Do you have to sow it often and thickly? I'm used to planting herbs and forgetting about them until I want to use them, and this approach does not work for cilantro!

My partner (not a gardener) offered to look after some plants for someone else for a month or so, and one pot is the dreaded cilantro. It's up a couple inches, and was kept in the house. We don't really have a sunny window. What's the best way to keep it happy?

My own cilantro has long since bolted, and I haven't gotten around to planting more.
habitat_gardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #2
jmsieglaff
Tomatovillian™
 
jmsieglaff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Southern WI
Posts: 2,054
Default

Grow it as cool as possible, which for most places in the summer isn't realistic. So I think the only alternative is to sow often and sow thickly. That's the one thing I don't grow for the salsa we make, I get it at the farmer's market. It is an irritating herb to grow.
jmsieglaff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #3
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 2,533
Default

expect it to bolt. Don't expect it to stay in the leaf stage more than a week or two depending on the temperatures. It is a plant that needs reseeding directly in the herb garden regularly.
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is online now   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #4
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 28,610
Default

I dont know about where you guys live but where I live it is as cheap as rotten duck eggs.
They practically give the stuff away.
If I were to grow it, it would be for the roots and seeds.
Yes all parts of the plant are edible.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #5
Nematode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 1,308
Default

Sow often, some shade helps keep it from bolting.
Am currently experimenting with growing it under tomatoes.
It is growing slowly, so hopefully it will not bolt so fast.
Nematode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #6
Gerardo
Tomatovillian™
 
Gerardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: San Diego-Tijuana
Posts: 2,043
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmsieglaff View Post
Grow it as cool as possible, which for most places in the summer isn't realistic. So I think the only alternative is to sow often and sow thickly. That's the one thing I don't grow for the salsa we make, I get it at the farmer's market. It is an irritating herb to grow.
I agree on the irritating aspect. You have to sow every 2 weeks or so to have decent pre-bolt leaves at your disposal.

There was very little, if any, discernible difference between homegrown and purchased, and that was reason enough for me stop growing it.

Pops on the other hand, swears by it.
Gerardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #7
RobinB
Tomatovillian™
 
RobinB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Near Reno, NV
Posts: 1,599
Default

Grow it in the spring and fall. It's a cool season crop. That's why it bolts in the summer.
RobinB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #8
kurt
Tomatovillian™
 
kurt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Homestead, FL
Posts: 2,004
Default

My neighbor grows it profusely.He calls it the "fall down over plant"(elder Trinidadian man)He showed me how it jumps up,falls over reseats(reroots)itself.Somewhat like arugula,poppy,some cabbage and lettuce varieties.He showed me how to dense plant,keeping soil only 3/4 up in propagating starting container(so as to use the sides as a holding wall,no sprawling)Then when he puts it into ground he uses round(cut from plastic clear containers)about 6 inch collars to keep plant upright.He says they need to hold each other up.He grows them for the seed(coriander).Him and his wife make some great recipes and do a lot of pickling with the seeds.
__________________
KURT
kurt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10, 2015   #9
TNTiger
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: TN
Posts: 111
Default

Routine watering is also pretty important for cilantro - mine does better if I keep the growing mix damp.

I grow it everywhere there's an open spot and if it bolts it's ok because the beneficial insects love the little white flowers. I just plant more while I wait for the seeds to form and ripen on the bolted plants. It is harder to keep it going during the hottest part of the summer but I have it in abundance the rest of the year except during the coldest part of the winter.

It is cheap in the stores so I don't mind buying it if I need more than I can cut from my own garden but I love having a pretty steady supply anytime I want it. I frequently run out to cut just a little to sprinkle over a sliced tomato or into a bowl of salsa.
TNTiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 11, 2015   #10
NarnianGarden
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Finland, EU
Posts: 1,982
Default

I remember reading somewhere it is supposed to deter aphids, but my balcony garden last year proved otherwise - aphids seemed to love crawling on it, yuck.
So far, this year has been aphid-free... Hope that it will continue to be that way. Aphids are not welcome here!
NarnianGarden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 12, 2015   #11
pauldavid
Tomatovillian™
 
pauldavid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NE Louisiana, Zone 8A
Posts: 1,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobinB View Post
Grow it in the spring and fall. It's a cool season crop. That's why it bolts in the summer.

I found that to be the case with Cilantro. The heat will cause it to bolt quickly.
pauldavid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 13, 2015   #12
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 5,952
Default

It can take some really cold weather and during the dead of winter is the only time it doesn't bolt down here. One or two warm days and bam! its bolted. It is just too much trouble and bolts way too soon and when it is way too small during the time of the year when I'm getting tomatoes ripe off the vine for fresh salsa.

Bill
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 13, 2015   #13
TNTiger
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: TN
Posts: 111
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by b54red View Post
It can take some really cold weather and during the dead of winter is the only time it doesn't bolt down here. One or two warm days and bam! its bolted. It is just too much trouble and bolts way too soon and when it is way too small during the time of the year when I'm getting tomatoes ripe off the vine for fresh salsa.

Bill
We're pretty close to the northern edge of Alabama and I can grow it most of the time!
I'm thinking you must be in LA . . . Lower Alabama!
TNTiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 13, 2015   #14
joseph
Tomatovillian™
 
joseph's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Cache Valley, N/E of The Great Salt Lake
Posts: 1,156
Default

A farmer brings beautiful cilantro to my farmer's market all summer long, but only because she grows it in an air-conditioned greenhouse.
joseph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 13, 2015   #15
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 8,829
Default

Mine in summer turns into this 18" tall flowering weed. While I'm sort of curious to grow it, I cannot tell the difference in home grown cilantro and what we get for 28 cents at the grocery store.

LA - Pensacola through Tallahassee.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:00 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★