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Old March 15, 2012   #1
ScottinAtlanta
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Default SVB - BT or Sevin?

My cucs and squash are going out tomorrow. What do you folks prefer - BT or Sevin? We are likely to get hit bad by the squash borers this year, and I want to be ready from day 1 to fight like a Marine in Tripoli.
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Old March 15, 2012   #2
janezee
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Why not wrap the stems in nylon stockings? I'd try it if I had a problem. When I did, as I recall, they only liked the thickest, oldest part of the stem. If they still tried, then they'd be further down the vine, and not so likely to kill the whole plant. Medical gauze, the stretchy kind, might work, too, but I think it stays wet too long.

I would never use Sevin, and bt washes away too fast for me here. Thank goodness they hate our weather.

j
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Old March 16, 2012   #3
fortyonenorth
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BT is only effective on caterpillars. It's effective to combat horn worms, cabbage loopers, etc. Vine borers, cucumber beetles and the like will not be affected by it. Unfortunately, they require heavy artillery - at least in my experience.
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Old March 16, 2012   #4
ScottinAtlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janezee View Post
Why not wrap the stems in nylon stockings? I'd try it if I had a problem. When I did, as I recall, they only liked the thickest, oldest part of the stem. If they still tried, then they'd be further down the vine, and not so likely to kill the whole plant. Medical gauze, the stretchy kind, might work, too, but I think it stays wet too long.

I would never use Sevin, and bt washes away too fast for me here. Thank goodness they hate our weather.

j
Sweetheart, I wonder if we are in two different war zones. In Georgia, it is a fully engaged, 24 hour a day, battle with the bugs. They are waiting tonight in battalions for me to set out the squash, and as soon as I do, they will launch a frontal attack. Will nylon stockings really work in this war zone?
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Old March 16, 2012   #5
ArcherB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottinAtlanta View Post
Sweetheart, I wonder if we are in two different war zones. In Georgia, it is a fully engaged, 24 hour a day, battle with the bugs. They are waiting tonight in battalions for me to set out the squash, and as soon as I do, they will launch a frontal attack. Will nylon stockings really work in this war zone?

Probably not, but they will have legs to die for!
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Old March 16, 2012   #6
b54red
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I try to spray my squash vines near the base and as they get larger further up the stem with Sevin every 10 days or after every hard rain. I also mix in a little molasses and dish washing soap. BT doesn't work for me down here on squash borers. I also mulch heavily around the base of each plant. Despite doing all of this I will still eventually lose most of my plants to squash vine borers. I don't know if there is any way to completely stop them with anything that won't also poison you too. I used to split the stem a bit and pull the borers out and bury the damaged part of the stem; but by the time the plant was fully recovered it would usually already have more borers in it.
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Old March 16, 2012   #7
roamwhereiwant2
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Scott, Are you really setting out your squash and cukes tomorrow? I know the weather is glorious this week but I'm hesitating because April 1st-10th is the last frost date.

Nylon stockings? Where would you get enough - who wears nylons in Atlanta? I'm growing mostly Maximas which scream "come and get me" to the borers.

Yvonne

From Clemson's website:

Control of Curcurbit Insects

Cucumber beetles or squash beetles can be controlled effectively using carbaryl (Sevin), but wait one day after spraying before harvest. For aphids or spider mites use an insecticidal soap such as Concern Insect Killing Soap or Safer Brand Soap. Control heavy populations of aphids or spider mites with neem oil extract (such as Green Light Neem Concentrate or Bonide Bon-Neem).
For vine borers and pickleworms control after mid-June, apply carbaryl (Sevin) or neem oil extract weekly, and spray or dust in the evening to not kill pollinating insects. Wait one day after spraying carbaryl before harvest. Rotenone (such as Hi-Yield Rotenone Dust) is effective against younger squash bugs, but not against the adults. Esfenvalerate (such as Ortho Bug-B-Gon MAX Garden & Landscape Insect Killer RTU) or permethrin (such as Bonide Eight Insect Control Vegetable, Fruit & Flower Concentrate) or bifenthrin (such as Ortho Bug-B-Gon MAX Lawn & Garden Insect Killer Concentrate) will control cucumber beetles, squash bugs, squash vine borers and pickleworms, but wait 3 days after spraying before harvest.
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Old March 16, 2012   #8
O.P. Mater
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I heard a tip on "Making It Grow" (SC public TV) to wrap the stems close to the ground with aluminum foil to "foil" the dreaded SV borer. I tried it one time, but failed to maintain it when the squash plants grew and pushed the foil off. This year I will try re wrapping with foil after 2 or 3 weeks. It has promise if you are only growing a manageable number of squash plants.
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Old March 16, 2012   #9
ScottinAtlanta
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Thanks, folks, for all your suggestions. I think I will go with Sevin this year to see how that works. The Straight 8 cucs, Horn of Plenty, Straightneck Yellow, Pattypan White, and Delicata went into the ground today, so the battle starts tonight.

If you don't hear from me again, I lost. But don't cry for me, Tomatoville. I went down fighting.
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Old March 16, 2012   #10
janezee
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Darlin', I just asked "why not?"

I like to think 'outside the box.'

You could try it on one.
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Old March 20, 2012   #11
roamwhereiwant2
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janezee, Why not indeed? I may buy a pair of cheap nylons to try this. But could you describe how this is done? I can't visualize this at all.

Yvonne
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Old March 20, 2012   #12
ScottinAtlanta
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Folks, I went with a floating row cover, and I think it will work just fine. There is no physical access to the plants for those dreadful insects.
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Old March 20, 2012   #13
janezee
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Yvonne, I'd get a couple of safety pins, start near the ground, pin the first wrap, and then proceed like an Ace bandage. Not too tight, but tight enough to keep the bugs out. Of course, the stocking would 'grow' with the thickness of the stem. Pin at the end to hold in place.

Now that I've thought of it, I almost wish I had a use for it.
But if you really do try it, I'd love to know if it works for you.

My garden is small, and there's no room for squash inside the fence, so I'm buying deer netting and tenting my squash. My squash pests have 4 hooves and sometimes antlers.

I'm using bridal tulle (Jo-Anne's) to tent my brassicas and to make bags for my tomatoes and peppers. They'll think that that's a huge veil by the time I buy a whole bolt!
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Old March 20, 2012   #14
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Janzee, I will definitely try it. What color stockings go with green? I tried row cover last year......it worked until I removed it to allow the bees to reach the flowers. The bees were accompanied by a host of SVB's and squash bugs. Never a dull moment. Will let you know how the stockings work. They will stretch unlike the aluminum foil and will stay on better. Thanks for posting the idea. One day we will figure this out if we just keep trying.
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Old March 20, 2012   #15
ScottinAtlanta
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OP, did you remove the row cover during the day and replace at night? I understand that the SVB moths come out during the evening, so I wonder if timing would work with the row covers?

Or, if row covers cannot be used after the vine blooms, I will turn back to nylons or foil.
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