Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating melons, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins and gourds.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old July 2, 2016   #16
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,630
Default

I tried Sweet Success this year after reading many good reviews here. I have them in my mini-tunnel and they have produced insanely well. Unfortunately I was dumb and planted a non hybrid pickling cuke in there as well and they crossed. Next year I'm doing all seedless cukes. The one Carolyn posted looks like a good pickler, might try it.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #17
Gerardo
Tomatovillian™
 
Gerardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: San Diego-Tijuana
Posts: 2,110
Default

Earlier today I gently potted up two Sweet Success and two Manny F1. Succession planting has really helped, as has setting them under shade.


Calypso, Monika, Super Zagross, Manny and Sweet Success are still in the game for me.
Gerardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #18
ddsack
Tomatovillian™
 
ddsack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Northern Minnesota - zone 3
Posts: 2,536
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewWestGardener View Post
Ddsack,
I checked the cukes today. The F2s are doing surprisingly well-- i already have a 2" fruit on a 9" vine. More importantly, there are multiple flowers, both male and female forming on every leaf node, starting from the first true leaves all the way up, 3-4 flower buds per node. It looks like the vines are going to be small but loaded. I will try to save seeds from the best again.
That's great to hear! Early, prolific and short vines are what I'd be searching for too! Hope my success will mirror yours.
__________________
Dee

**************
ddsack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #19
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 3,999
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
Some time ago a poster showed photos of a cucumber that he/she was growing indoors under lights during the winter. I don't think it was hand pollinated. The poster had a few cucumbers produced during the winter, which attracted my attention. It sounded like a pretty amazing feat to me. I'm not certain but I think it was Diva.

For me cucumbers are feast or famine due to the cucumber beetle or if powdery mildew sets up residence.

- Lisa
That was me, actually. The name of it finally came to me - it was Passandra F1. They were good but I hope Diva is even better. Nice to see it was bred at Johnny's, they do a great job of selecting good varieties.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #20
Nematode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 1,488
Default

Diva is a good fresh eater, super productive too.
Nice to hear alibi is a good one have those and northern pickling going for pickles.
Quick pickles are one of my favorite things from the garden. Especially with garlic and hot peppers thrown in.

Sounds like super zagross and sweet success are pooular.
Nematode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #21
Barb_FL
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Indialantic, Florida
Posts: 1,352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewWestGardener View Post
A bit off topic here. Last fall, i found a mature old Picolino F1 cucumber in the greenhouse with a belly full of seeds, it must have been pollinated by some other variety, so i saved some and planted some this year. The seedlings came up nicely and transplanted well, so we'll see what i'll get out of them. The F1 production was impressive.
How did you save the seeds? I've tried several ways - fermenting, just getting off the gel and the seeds are mostly flat vs the ones you buy.
Barb_FL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #22
peppero
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: selmer, tn
Posts: 2,896
Default

Please keep the information coming in.

Jon
peppero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #23
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,630
Default

Yes and I am very interested in hearing reviews on seedless pickling cukes.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #24
NewWestGardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 346
Default

You don't actually save seeds from a parthenocarpic cucumber, they are not developed. The ones i saved must have been pollinated by another regular cucumber that had male flowers, so it produced viable seeds, they were plump and full, not flat, that's why i saved some.
The f2 offsprings from this cucumber are the only variety i am growing in the greenhouse now, so no more cross pollination with others. There are both male and female flowers on the same plants, and a real cumcumber growing, so now they become regular cucumbers. Can i save seeds again? Likely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb_FL View Post
How did you save the seeds? I've tried several ways - fermenting, just getting off the gel and the seeds are mostly flat vs the ones you buy.

Last edited by NewWestGardener; July 3, 2016 at 10:40 AM.
NewWestGardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #25
ginger2778
Florida TAG™ Coordinator
 
ginger2778's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Plantation, Florida zone 10
Posts: 7,097
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewWestGardener View Post
You don't actually save seeds from a parthenocarpic cucumber, they are not developed. The ones i saved must have been pollinated by another regular cucumber that had male flowers, so it produced viable seeds, they were plump and full, not flat, that's why i saved some.
The f2s from this cucumber are the only variety i am growing in the greenhouse, they have both male and female flowers on the same plants, so now they become regular cucumbers. Can i save seeds again? Likely.
I think she might actually be asking by what tecnique does a person save cucumber seeds? Ferment? Dry?
__________________
Marsha

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.”
― Neil deGrasse Tyson
ginger2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #26
NewWestGardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 346
Default

I thought the concern was about seeds being "flat"-- underdeveloped seeds.
Otherwise, yes, fermentation works well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
I think she might actually be asking by what tecnique does a person save cucumber seeds? Ferment? Dry?
NewWestGardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #27
jillian
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 646
Default

Great thread, I will be trying some of the recommendations in next year's garden. Am growing Diva for first time this year and so far am not impressed. My NON parthenocarpic is pumping them out however, but I know it will just be a matter of time before it succumbs to powdery mildew.
jillian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #28
Barb_FL
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Indialantic, Florida
Posts: 1,352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
I think she might actually be asking by what tecnique does a person save cucumber seeds? Ferment? Dry?
+1 Thank you Marsha.

I tried saving seeds from a Snow (pickling cucumber) that grew way TOO large; I let it yellow, but must of not gave it enough time.
Barb_FL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #29
Barb_FL
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Indialantic, Florida
Posts: 1,352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jillian View Post
Great thread, I will be trying some of the recommendations in next year's garden. Am growing Diva for first time this year and so far am not impressed. My NON parthenocarpic is pumping them out however, but I know it will just be a matter of time before it succumbs to powdery mildew.
I've found the non-parthenocarpic do produce tons more flowers and would guess at least the same # of female flowers. But if you are in a greenhouse, parthenocarpic is the way to go.

I'm growing Alpha Beit right now; I wrap in tulle at night to avoid the pickle worm moth but in the AM when I take the tulle off, bees are waiting to buzz and seem like they stay there all day. I haven't sprayed at all. The leaves of mine usually get really cripsy near the end.

Three seeds - 2 in EB, 1 in RP - 27 cucumbers in the first week of production (Sunday 6/26 - 7/2). Third pic is this AMs harvest not counted in the 27.

I'm interested in this thread and parthenocarpic types because I want to grow year round and while I'm away I need to keep the tulle on 24/7 to keep the moths away.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Cuke Plants front July 2 (400x300).jpg (66.6 KB, 78 views)
File Type: jpg Cuke Flowers (400x300).jpg (60.0 KB, 78 views)
File Type: jpg July 3 Cuke Harvest (400x300).jpg (50.1 KB, 78 views)
Barb_FL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 3, 2016   #30
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 19,677
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewWestGardener View Post
You don't actually save seeds from a parthenocarpic cucumber, they are not developed. The ones i saved must have been pollinated by another regular cucumber that had male flowers, so it produced viable seeds, they were plump and full, not flat, that's why i saved some.
The f2 offsprings from this cucumber are the only variety i am growing in the greenhouse now, so no more cross pollination with others. There are both male and female flowers on the same plants, and a real cumcumber growing, so now they become regular cucumbers. Can i save seeds again? Likely.
Just repeating what you posted in post #7

(A bit off topic here. Last fall, i found a mature old Picolino F1 cucumber in the greenhouse with a belly full of seeds, it must have been pollinated by some other variety, so i saved some and planted some this year. The seedlings came up nicely and transplanted well, so we'll see what i'll get out of them. The F1 production was impressive)

With parthenocarpic varieties,tomatoes included, at first they have just wisps of undeveloped seeds but as they mature fully formed viable seeds are formed and that's great since how else are parthenocarpic varieties going to be perpetuated?

For sure they are going to rebreed them as I see it and just my opinion,perhaps,after being up close and personal with all the parthenocarpic tomato ones that Dr. Baggett bred and feedback from those who grew them.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:47 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★