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Old January 17, 2017   #31
AlittleSalt
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Carolyn, those are nice looking tomatoes. Thanks for pointing them out.

I think my wife's tastes are changing about cooked tomatoes. Last night I made some goulash that she really liked. She even eats pizza every once in while. Maybe there's some paste tomatoes in our future? And just between you, me, and the other thousands of Tomatoville members and visitors - I did sneak in some Antique Roman and Striped Roman seeds in the planting cells this year.
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Old January 17, 2017   #32
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I agree that elongated fruit is more susceptible, probably a result of the "el" gene Most non-elongated tomatoes get BER, especially if they are "dense, meaty" tomatoes. Density of flesh is still the most predictive trait.
Does anyone have experience with calcium nitrate fertilizer? BER is associated with Calcium deficency. A Perdue extension specialist says that regular ammonium nitrate fertilizers inhibit calcium absorbtion. The recommendation is to start early and do a monthly feeding of Calcium nitrate fertilizer. This is also supposed to decrease blossom drop and encourage fruit set. Soil pH can also be amended with lime or gypsum to improve calcium uptake. What commercial product(s) have Calcium nitrate?
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Old January 17, 2017   #33
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Another tomato form that is great for sauce and unsung in general are piriform tomatoes such as Cuneo giant pear, red pear or for a determinate: Goldmans Italian-American as examples. There are lots of old European tomatoes with a pear or a ribbed fatter at the bottom (like me) shape I think in general they are less sweet overall and with a stronger traditional tomatoey flavour in general than hearts and are very suited to cooking with few seeds. Tomato seeds are bitter when cooked and fewer seeds make for a better sauce for sure.

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Old January 17, 2017   #34
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One of my wife's complaints is that too many red sauces are too sweet for her. So for our purposes an old time tomato-y flavor that is not too sweet would be perfect .
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Old January 19, 2017   #35
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Originally Posted by ChefBertMor View Post
One of my wife's complaints is that too many red sauces are too sweet for her. So for our purposes an old time tomato-y flavor that is not too sweet would be perfect .
For me the sweeter it is the better it taste, but I know people here who want to get a tangy/acidic taste and therefore use 1/3 of Costoluto Fiorentino and 2/3 of other regular paste tomatoes (which in my area usually are San Marzano, Roma or Canestrino).
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Old January 19, 2017   #36
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Does anyone have experience with calcium nitrate fertilizer? BER is associated with Calcium deficency. A Perdue extension specialist says that regular ammonium nitrate fertilizers inhibit calcium absorbtion. The recommendation is to start early and do a monthly feeding of Calcium nitrate fertilizer. This is also supposed to decrease blossom drop and encourage fruit set. Soil pH can also be amended with lime or gypsum to improve calcium uptake. What commercial product(s) have Calcium nitrate?
I think I read in some other thread that Tomato-Tone has Calcium. Maybe someone else can confirm you that.
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Old January 19, 2017   #37
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One of my wife's complaints is that too many red sauces are too sweet for her. So for our purposes an old time tomato-y flavor that is not too sweet would be perfect .

I have the same complaint about many tomato sauces I've had at restaurants or those made by friends. For some reason a lot of people have decided sugar is a mandatory ingredient for tomato sauces.
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Old January 19, 2017   #38
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I haven't tried it yet, but... Divine Maltese...it's name alone makes me want to save a space in the garden for 2017.
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Old January 19, 2017   #39
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What I have read is to add more lemon juice/citric acid to tone down that sweet taste. I've only made sauce twice and adding lemon juice did help.
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Old January 19, 2017   #40
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I haven't tried it yet, but... Divine Maltese...it's name alone makes me want to save a space in the garden for 2017.
http://t.tatianastomatobase.com:88/w...b=General_Info

Available from Tania,who was the first to introduce it.

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Old January 19, 2017   #41
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What I have read is to add more lemon juice/citric acid to tone down that sweet taste. I've only made sauce twice and adding lemon juice did help.
Sauces made with commercial tomato products have sugar/high fructose corn syrup etc. added. If a sauce is too sweet most likely sweetener has bee added (my boss insists that I add sugar to "balance the flavor." Tomato sauce made with fresh grown tomatoes generally are not overly sweet, therefor are more acidic, just like a fresh tomato should be. Frankly, if you just omit the sweetener, you can forego the lemon juice.
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Old January 19, 2017   #42
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Originally Posted by ChefBertMor View Post
Sauces made with commercial tomato products have sugar/high fructose corn syrup etc. added. If a sauce is too sweet most likely sweetener has bee added (my boss insists that I add sugar to "balance the flavor." Tomato sauce made with fresh grown tomatoes generally are not overly sweet, therefor are more acidic, just like a fresh tomato should be. Frankly, if you just omit the sweetener, you can forego the lemon juice.
interesting to compare commercial tomato sauces bottled in Europe with American commercial varieties. completely different with a sharp tangy tomato flavor in the Italian ones vs a much sweeter American one. Ketchup too.
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Old January 19, 2017   #43
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I think I read in some other thread that Tomato-Tone has Calcium. Maybe someone else can confirm you that.
Maybe Carolyn can shed more light on this.
BER often is not due to calcium deficiency in the soil or fertilizer but rathe has to do with inconsistent moisture level in the medium. That is why you get more BER on tomatoes grown in small container than in the ground.

But to supplement calcium I have learned a simple way :
Save your eggshells , wash the, dry them , grind them in coffee grinder.
Put the ground in a glass and add vinegar to it, stir and let sit for a couple of days.
What you will get is Calcium acetate, in which calcium is in ionic form ( Ca++).
Add some to watering can and water your plants for immediate action.
Alternatively you can add vinegar to Dolomitic lime.
Forget burying eggshells around your plant. It will take years for the calcium in eggshell (calcium carbonate ) to break down and becaome available in Ca++ ionic form.
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Old January 19, 2017   #44
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Maybe Carolyn can shed more light on this.
BER often is not due to calcium deficiency in the soil or fertilizer but rathe has to do with inconsistent moisture level in the medium. That is why you get more BER on tomatoes grown in small container than in the ground.

But to supplement calcium I have learned a simple way :
Save your eggshells , wash the, dry them , grind them in coffee grinder.
Put the ground in a glass and add vinegar to it, stir and let sit for a couple of days.
What you will get is Calcium acetate, in which calcium is in ionic form ( Ca++).
Add some to watering can and water your plants for immediate action.
Alternatively you can add vinegar to Dolomitic lime.
Forget burying eggshells around your plant. It will take years for the calcium in eggshell (calcium carbonate ) to break down and becaome available in Ca++ ionic form.
I've posted this before and here it is again.

http://www.webgrower.com/information/carolyn_ber.html

Mike Dunton at Victory Seeds asked me to write an article about BER, so I did.

It's a rewrite of what I was also asked to do for Daves's Garde,with some additions.

I don't have time to reread the article so I hope I also addressed the difference between external and internal BER and there was another addition I made when posting it here just a week or so, but I forgot what that was right now.

I do hope it helps, b/c BER will always be a problem, despite all of the research that has been done.

Carolyn
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Old January 19, 2017   #45
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Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
http://t.tatianastomatobase.com:88/w...b=General_Info

Available from Tania,who was the first to introduce it.

Carolyn
I checked with Tania about the availability of seeds for this Divine Maltese.

She won't have any till next year, as she is out and needs to grow it this year to replenish her stock of seeds.
Boy, this one truly sounds great! Hard to believe one can be planning for 2018 this early?
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