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Old March 30, 2017   #16
Worth1
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Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
I didn't get started planting today. I got called away to go catch some fish.

On the way there, I noticed pecan trees are growing their green fuzzy stuff before leaves. I'm wondering if Pecan trees have leafed out in your area Worth?
I'm sure they have I will have to look tomorrow.

Worth
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Old March 30, 2017   #17
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My Dad is sick of AK winters, he is in Texas right now looking for a winter home. You guys may have to make some room for some northern, pale skinned, cold footed, Alaskans. The wife and I are sick of it too, we are going to see what the parents think during their scouting mission.
Great place to live hot summers but the winters are killer nice.
You will be growing tomatoes in the winter time here I have no doubt.
I think I was picking tomatoes at the end of March last year.
You could make a fortune here with a big green house with what you know.

Worth
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Old March 30, 2017   #18
AlittleSalt
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My Dad is sick of AK winters, he is in Texas right now looking for a winter home. You guys may have to make some room for some northern, pale skinned, cold footed, Alaskans. The wife and I are sick of it too, we are going to see what the parents think during their scouting mission.
Mark, you wont stay pale skinned here - unless you never go outside, but that wouldn't happen. Going with what Worth wrote below. With your greenhouse skills, you could grow /sell tomatoes here year-round.

I have to add a little shock factor Could you imagine using air conditioning in your greenhouses for 3+ months of the year here?

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Great place to live hot summers but the winters are killer nice.
You will be growing tomatoes in the winter time here I have no doubt.
I think I was picking tomatoes at the end of March last year.
You could make a fortune here with a big green house with what you know.

Worth
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Old March 30, 2017   #19
AKmark
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It would only be for the winter, but my Dad may stay for at least 6 months out of the year. They just texted me and really like the area. I'm sure he will have a winter GH, that's where I get it from. LOL
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Old March 30, 2017   #20
AlittleSalt
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Sounds like you're in the bonus round on your sweet taters!.im planting veggies now , can you explain your okra seeds soak. Is it in paper towels and then how do you get em in the soil? . Jimbo
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Dish plate paper towel seeds paper towel water.
When they start to germinate I use a dibble to make holes in the soil for each seed one foot apart.
This dibble I made myself.
Worth
Attachment 71145
Like I wrote above, I've never done it that way. When you plant the okra seeds with the tail on them - Is that tail planted downwards as a root, or is it the plant that tail needs to be planted upward? Maybe plant it sideways?
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Old March 31, 2017   #21
Worth1
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Like I wrote above, I've never done it that way. When you plant the okra seeds with the tail on them - Is that tail planted downwards as a root, or is it the plant that tail needs to be planted upward? Maybe plant it sideways?
The tail shouldn't be too long but sometimes things happen.
Maybe 1/16 to 1/8 inch is best and it is the root.
Down or on the side is best.
I have messed around and had to plant them with much longer roots.
My rule of thumb for seeds is to plant them around 2 to 3 times the size of the seed deep.
They need a good root system before they emerge from the soil.
BUT seeds will lay on top and drill their way in.
Some do this better than others.
When you see some of then germinating plant them all.

Worth
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Old March 31, 2017   #22
AlittleSalt
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I will start some in the morning with this method. I really like the idea of letting the soil warm up some more. Okra likes it hot.
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Old March 31, 2017   #23
Worth1
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It would only be for the winter, but my Dad may stay for at least 6 months out of the year. They just texted me and really like the area. I'm sure he will have a winter GH, that's where I get it from. LOL
Mark I can not tell you how many times I heard Alaskans say they have never been so cold in there life until they went through a Texas winter.
I would leave 30 below come home and freeze my tail off at 30 above.
People would ask me about this.
I told them 30 below doesn't feel cold it is almost like being in a fire.
I know you know what I mean.

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I will start some in the morning with this method. I really like the idea of letting the soil warm up some more. Okra likes it hot.
Even a good 24 hour soaking without sprouting works great.
My logic behind this is seeds sprout at certain temperature.
Once they have sprouted then it is game on for them to grow.
As for the comment many people make about okra loving heat.
I tend to disagree a wee bit.
It ((tolerates)) heat but loves the mid temperatures around 75 degrees like any other plant.

My seeds are going in the ground either today or tomorrow regardless if they have germinated or not.
I bet that they will be germinating this afternoon or tonight.
I bought them last year.

Worth
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Old March 31, 2017   #24
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I'm doing fine how are you.
Not working up ((there)) anymore.
My choice after the wife passed away.
You would be surprised who all they fired and let go.



I saw a pile of corn coming up the other day just sprouting in the fields.
Oh, I didn't know, my condolences.
I have been working in the San Juan Basin for over 8 years now . I haven't been back to the slope since December 2008. But there have been a lot of chamges over the years.
Thought you would like to hear those green giants, and lime green salads you gave me are still going.
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Old March 31, 2017   #25
Worth1
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Oh, I didn't know, my condolences.
I have been working in the San Juan Basin for over 8 years now . I haven't been back to the slope since December 2008. But there have been a lot of chamges over the years.
Thought you would like to hear those green giants, and lime green salads you gave me are still going.
I remember that Black Cherry you sprouted from seed from one I had up there on the slope and hauled it home on the plane.

By the way thank you.
I decided to leave so I could have some sort of a life at home and do things I couldn't working there.
Time was going by way too fast.
I talked Lou and Francis the electrical foremen both into retiring before it was too late.
Both of them were very good friends of mine.
I sat both of them down and put the balance scales on the table for them.
I did the same for another guy that worked at GC 2 that lived in Colorado I cant remember his name to save my life.
He was the roustabout lead that worked for CH you know who I am talking about
Older red headed guy.
Getting those three guys off the slope was probably one of the best things I have ever did for anyone.
Francis was in his 70's and the other two were right behind him.
Worth
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Old March 31, 2017   #26
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I remeber those guys I am glad they stopped the madness. Unless you live in AK it gets too hard.
That black cherry is a long standing regular. I grow every year.
Y every year tomatoes are black cherry, brandywine( through selection is has become a huge producer in pounds per plant). Cherokee purple is always reliable. And then I pick a couple for sport. Last year was Berkley tie dye,this year I am growing some extra green varieties and an old aunt gurdie gold line last grown in 2006(signature tomatoe)

I took this job so I could be home every night, , rotation was slowly killing me and my marriage has improved since stopping. The big. sacrifice was moving out of Texas and away from the ocean. Worth it.
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Old March 31, 2017   #27
Worth1
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So many things going on at one time I sometimes dont know how I do it.
I have been cleaning and oiling the lathe cooking and trimming this darn Loquat tree at the same time.
I was waiting for the upper canopy to get bigger before I cut down the lower branches.
Now I can walk under the tree and get in the shade.
I will continue to do this to about the ten foot height.
They continuously put out suckers you have to prune or they will just be a big bush by pruning they become a nice tree.
I bought two of these little trees in one gallon containers.
Before and after.
Worth
IMG_20170331_4822.jpg

IMG_20170331_26738.jpg
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Old March 31, 2017   #28
Worth1
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In keeping within the theme of the thread while weeding the bed at the end of the driveway I found some more sweet potato plants growing, left them there.
I found a lone tomato plant growing where my tomato patch was last year I have no idea what it is but I put a cage around it.
Rest assured it will be a good one but it wont be Galina's as it is regular leaf.
My wild guess is Black Cherry.
Worth
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Old March 31, 2017   #29
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I just transplanted all of the sweet potatoes that survived the winter here into the raised beds.
Last year I let one vine grow up into a container and this spring it rewarded me with several slips.
Plus other ones coming up in places I didn't plant sweet potatoes.
My conclusion is at least here you can leave some in the ground for next year and this is what I did.
The ground doesn't freeze here so it wont kill the potato just the stuff above ground.
My sweet potatoes have done the same. I grew them in fabric pots, but I didn't realize that the roots grew right through the bottoms of the fabric pots and cut loose in the ground. I followed the roots for a few feet in every direction and then I just gave up. Well now they're sprouting. They're also sprouting in the compost pile that I may or may not have forgotten to turn in quite a while. That's fine by me, though. Food that I can't kill is the best food of all. I attached a picture of the bottom of one of the pots.
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Old March 31, 2017   #30
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Good luck with your accidental garden.
I could not have such a thing here. As there had been no garden before me and I started from scratch ( that is by scratching the grass )
BTW: One of the commercial crops grown around here is sweet potato.
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