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Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

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Old May 23, 2017   #16
PhilaGardener
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Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
I had forgotten the free thing that comes in handy - I started saving the lidded plastic containers strawberries and Campari tomatoes come in. They should work well for others to take home some cherry tomatoes in. After all, that's what they're made for.
When I have recycled plastic veg containers, sometimes folks seem to think that I'm just giving them tomatoes from the store.
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Old May 23, 2017   #17
clkeiper
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I do things on a little larger scale than a few here... I have what I call the Amish rototiller. it is a manual "tiller" one side has a set of cultivator tines and if you turn it over the other side has a wide scuffle hoe which is supported by a "wheel of cutting tines" I will have to get a picture of it and post it. it is obviously manual... takes a bit of muscles and a knack to get started using it but it makes no smelly fumes in the high tunnel while I am weeding/cultivating. works great after rototilling with a larg tiller in the garden, too. I like it quiet and this fills the bill.
A manual backpack transplanter. you fill the tank with your fertilizer water push down on the handle (which is about the size of the cell of a 3 pack from those disposable black plastic packs you buy plants in and throw away} while it is being pushed into the soil releases the the water via a spring and you literally mud in the plant. it is a two person job and goes extremely quick. we plant up about 10 rows 120' long in black plastic mulch... lots and lots of transplanting.
Felco pruners. I have had mine since high school. I graduated in 87.... 1 blade.
ARS pruners.
a never kink hose. I don't care what brand... but it had better not kink! with a ball valve on the end and quick connect couplers at ever end for every disconnect and addition or wand change.
a waterwand and a hanging basket wand with a dramm head. I have many in many different sizes. red, yellow, black purple... the narrow and the regular. different sizes for different jobs.
wonder waterer nozzle for seedlings in the propagation house
a mist nozzle...
I have a lot of products I am happy with and a lot I have tossed.
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Old May 23, 2017   #18
BigVanVader
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Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
I do things on a little larger scale than a few here... I have what I call the Amish rototiller. it is a manual "tiller" one side has a set of cultivator tines and if you turn it over the other side has a wide scuffle hoe which is supported by a "wheel of cutting tines" I will have to get a picture of it and post it. it is obviously manual... takes a bit of muscles and a knack to get started using it but it makes no smelly fumes in the high tunnel while I am weeding/cultivating. works great after rototilling with a larg tiller in the garden, too. I like it quiet and this fills the bill.
A manual backpack transplanter. you fill the tank with your fertilizer water push down on the handle (which is about the size of the cell of a 3 pack from those disposable black plastic packs you buy plants in and throw away} while it is being pushed into the soil releases the the water via a spring and you literally mud in the plant. it is a two person job and goes extremely quick. we plant up about 10 rows 120' long in black plastic mulch... lots and lots of transplanting.
Felco pruners. I have had mine since high school. I graduated in 87.... 1 blade.
ARS pruners.
a never kink hose. I don't care what brand... but it had better not kink! with a ball valve on the end and quick connect couplers at ever end for every disconnect and addition or wand change.
a waterwand and a hanging basket wand with a dramm head. I have many in many different sizes. red, yellow, black purple... the narrow and the regular. different sizes for different jobs.
wonder waterer nozzle for seedlings in the propagation house
a mist nozzle...
I have a lot of products I am happy with and a lot I have tossed.
please do post a pic. I am always looking for old school manual tools/equipment.
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Old May 23, 2017   #19
Ricky Shaw
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1) Floranova, one-part complete nutrient for soilless mediums. Easy to measure and mix, 1-2tsp per gallon of water at a cost of about 6 cents per gallon. I use it for seedlings and switch to Hydro-Garden's Tomato 4-18-38 after I pot-up.

2)
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Old May 23, 2017   #20
b54red
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Bleach. For mixing the diluted bleach spray which makes long term plant survival much easier down here in the heat and humidity. My wife needs it for my white tee shirts I wear when gardening.

Metal conduit. For building my racks that support my strings that hold my tomato plants with those wonderful little clips that can be had for barely above a penny apiece.

Daconil and Copper fungicides for help keeping the foliage diseases at bay.

Cottonseed meal in the 50# bag. Great long term slow release fertilizer and it keeps the earthworms so happy in the garden.

Silicon grafting clips. Without them I would have probably stopped growing tomatoes in my blighted soil. Grafting has given me so much more flexibility in the varieties that I can now grow and enjoy.

Tomatoville. Where I have learned so much and enjoyed so many good discussions of gardening joys and woes.

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Old May 23, 2017   #21
Randall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricky Shaw View Post
1) Floranova, one-part complete nutrient for soilless mediums. Easy to measure and mix, 1-2tsp per gallon of water at a cost of about 6 cents per gallon. I use it for seedlings and switch to Hydro-Garden's Tomato 4-18-38 after I pot-up.

2)
Good stuff. I like the idea of that wagon seat deal.
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Old May 23, 2017   #22
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Redding handloading products.
I have used and have just about all of the brands and have found Redding to be of the highest quality.

I ran over my Dramm watering wand with my lawn mower.
All that is left is the value handel.
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Old May 23, 2017   #23
Father'sDaughter
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I know there were a lot of cheaply made ones and they got a bad reputation, but I love my Pocket Hose. I bought the heavy duty 50' version with the brass hardware a few years ago.

It's fantastic for hand watering and fertilizing with my hose end dispenser as it's much lighter and easier to maneuver around and between my raised beds than a vinyl or rubber hose.

I use it at least twice a week during the gardening season, and it's holding out very well. I always disconnect and drain it when I'm done, which takes no time at all. And it gets stored out of the sun in the Rubbermaid container with the rest of my garden gadgets.
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Old May 23, 2017   #24
wildcat62
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My Honda FG110 garden tiller.
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Old May 23, 2017   #25
oakley
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A roll of cable ties. 3-4 per plant, easily adjusted. Always handy. I attach many to the
supports early on in the season and have them pre-cut and ready to use. I can move
them easily. End of season they just form a big ball sticking together, now ready for this
year. Some were left out all winter and still fresh.
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Old May 23, 2017   #26
Rockporter
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Oakley, doesn't that stuff get diseases on them?
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Old May 23, 2017   #27
clkeiper
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Old May 23, 2017   #28
oakley
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Oakley, doesn't that stuff get diseases on them?
Maybe if you have diseases. It certainly could be soaked in bleach/soap cleaner as i do
with re-using starting pots/cell trays.

Velcro type rolls have been available in garden centers for years but it is expensive and
really cheap quality. I used a good one 10-15 yrs ago but no longer available...
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Old May 23, 2017   #29
BigVanVader
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Nice! Thumbs up on the reflective plastic too!
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Old May 23, 2017   #30
MikeInCypress
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Carolyn K > I have one of these
Roto Hoes as well. Bought it from Stokes back in the '80's. Its a gem for getting beds ready. other than replacing a few bolts and the wooden handle it has served me well.

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