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Old July 6, 2017   #1
Dak
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Default What varieties of squash are you growing this year?

I planted a 25 foot row of squash this year, I have high hopes of not having to buy any squash until next year. I've planted:

Tondo di Toscana
Romanesco
Candystick Delicata
Hokkori 133
Kurinishiki
Zucca Butternut Rugosa
Terremoto
Papavero
Oregon Sweet Meat
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Old July 6, 2017   #2
Nematode
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Delicata.
So yummy oven roasted. Had it for the first time last fall and fell in love.
It's not all awesome though, had some from N.Y. at a farmstand it was beautiful. Had similar looking from the grocery store and gagged on it.
The skin is kind of weird and crunchy when roasted, but that flavor....
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Old July 6, 2017   #3
Dak
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I saw a blog that talked about Carol Deppe's varieties, it said that her Candystick was reminiscent of Medjool dates (!!!) Good to hear that it has a good reputation, Nematode.

I've got to find a way to rig up protection this year from the neighborhood peacock. He's so bold, when I was stringing up my tomatoes and had the chicken wire lifted, he tried helping himself, right next to me!
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Old July 14, 2017   #4
gorbelly
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Growing

Rugosa Friulana (summer squash)
Butternut Rugosa (summer/winter)
Kikuza (winter)
Blue Kuri/Blue Hokkaido (winter)

Only 1 plant of each, though, as I have limited space and have to grow up trellises. Except for the Rugosa Friulana--I sowed 2 of those.
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Old July 14, 2017   #5
HudsonValley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nematode View Post
Delicata.
So yummy oven roasted. Had it for the first time last fall and fell in love.
It's not all awesome though, had some from N.Y. at a farmstand it was beautiful. Had similar looking from the grocery store and gagged on it.
The skin is kind of weird and crunchy when roasted, but that flavor....
I'm growing delicata again this year, too. Last year, my one plant bore 17 or 18 squash (I think 5-7 is normal). I probably shouldn't have fed it Mater Magic. It took over part of the lawn, strangled a few eggplants, and pulled down a 4' pepper plant. That plant was a giant pain in the rear, but it was kinda worth it. This year's seems better-behaved, but it's still early... Good luck with it!
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Old July 14, 2017   #6
Fred Hempel
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Butternut Rugosa
Magda Cousa Zucchini
Jaune et Vert Patty Pan
Potimarron
Chirimen
Terremoto
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Old July 14, 2017   #7
gorbelly
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Fred, do you grow Chirimen a lot? How is it? I wanted to grow it this year but it was a toss-up between it and Blue Kuri. So I'll probably grow it next year.
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Old July 15, 2017   #8
pmcgrady
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Patty pan assortment
Butternut
Yokohama
Chioga Sea Pumpkin
Mammoth Table Queen
Delicata
Sweet Dumpling
Blue Hubbard
Spaghetti
Some type of squash from India (my cousin received them from his doctor friend)

Zucchini:
Black Beauty
Golden
Cocozele
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Old July 18, 2017   #9
Dak
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This has been a dangerous thread to read, so many new varieties I want to try now.
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Old July 18, 2017   #10
Fred Hempel
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I grow Chirimen every year. Due to it's soft, dark and bumpy skin it is difficult to make into soups, without alot of work removing the skin.

However, the skin is edible and the flavor is really top notch. If Chirimen had lighter skin, I think it might take over the world, because you could easily puree it into a great soup (without the dark flesh making the soup a muddy grey).

The soft skin does make the variety good to use for roasting, though. Strips of the flesh roasted in the oven are out of this world. The skin caramelizes.

This is not the most asked for squash, but the customers who want it are very cultish about it. I too, am a member of the Chirimen cult.

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Originally Posted by gorbelly View Post
Fred, do you grow Chirimen a lot? How is it? I wanted to grow it this year but it was a toss-up between it and Blue Kuri. So I'll probably grow it next year.
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Old July 18, 2017   #11
Fred Hempel
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Blue Kuri is great too! It's advantage being that hard skin which gives it a 6+ month shelf life at room temperature.

Good flavor too.
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Old July 18, 2017   #12
Fritz77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Hempel View Post
Butternut Rugosa
Magda Cousa Zucchini
Jaune et Vert Patty Pan
Potimarron
Chirimen
Terremoto
Where does Terremoto come from? It means "earthquake" in Italian...
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Old July 18, 2017   #13
Fritz77
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Has anyone ever grown/tried Galeux d'Eysines? What does it taste like? Is it easy to grow?
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Old July 18, 2017   #14
ako1974
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Butternut and Bush Buttercup. I absolutely want to grow more - summer squash really - but I get tired of battling SVB. Green-striped cushaw is a great one, with thick, hard stems.
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Old July 18, 2017   #15
Fred Hempel
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Galeux D'Eysines is fantastic. Amy Goldman, in her book, says the flavor is awful, but I strongly disagree. I think it is a fantastic pie squash. Very sweet flesh.

I have people who bug me for it every year.

Terremoto is a landrace of tri-lobed squash we developed (Triamble and Galeux D'Eysines are both in there).

We called it Terremoto because 1) the skin of the pink and blue types is so hard it could conceivably withstand an earthquake, and 2) the pink type lasts well over a year, and the blue often over 2 years -- so it is the perfect squash to put in your "earthquake" kit. In only need to be replaced every year with a new squash.

We have had market customers buy Terremoto for display, and after a year they eat the squash (and buy a new one for display).

Like Triamble, the flesh of Terremoto is very dense and on the savory side.

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Where does Terremoto come from? It means "earthquake" in Italian...
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