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Old 1 Week Ago   #1
Antipodean
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Default Tomato, Peppers, Eggplant and Okra

Hello from the deep deep deep south, the southern hemisphere actually!

This is about the time of the year that i do my tomato starts, however this year i also want to start peppers, eggplant and okra.

Just wondering about timing, would you start these at the same time, earlier or later?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #2
Worth1
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Peppers sooner okra much later if you have cold weather.
Egg plant about the same.
Okra is one of the few plants that thrive in hot weather, it does not like the cold.
One time I had the TV turned up too loud and the okra heard the freeze/frost forecast and fell over dead before it even got cold.
Just looked you seem to be about like where I live in Texas in the winter.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #3
ScottinAtlanta
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In order of earliness:
Superhot peppers
okra
eggplants
tomatoes
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Old 1 Week Ago   #4
Antipodean
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Peppers sooner okra much later if you have cold weather.
Egg plant about the same.
Okra is one of the few plants that thrive in hot weather, it does not like the cold.
One time I had the TV turned up too loud and the okra heard the freeze/frost forecast and fell over dead before it even got cold.
Just looked you seem to be about like where I live in Texas in the winter.

Worth
Thanks worth, yes i'm in a hot temperate zone.....winters are very mild, no frost. I did grow okra last year for the first time (from purchased seedlings) and they were great in the heat. They are not common down under but I like them, very tasty!
Thanks again!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #5
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antipodean View Post
Thanks worth, yes i'm in a hot temperate zone.....winters are very mild, no frost. I did grow okra last year for the first time (from purchased seedlings) and they were great in the heat. They are not common down under but I like them, very tasty!
Thanks again!
You are welcome.
You should be able to just direct sow the okra right out in the garden after soaking a day or two.
I let mine germinate before I plant them.
No need to transplant.
Worth
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Old 1 Week Ago   #6
My Foot Smells
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I grow okra in cheap 2 gallon pots initially, the soil heats up faster. Then I just cut the bottom out of the pot and wiggle it into the ground. The hotter the better and I wait until it starts to bend over before watering.

At seasons end, have to tie a chain and pull em up with a 4x4

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Old 1 Week Ago   #7
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by My Foot Smells View Post
I grow okra in cheap 2 gallon pots initially, the soil heats up faster. Then I just cut the bottom out of the pot and wiggle it into the ground. The hotter the better and I wait until it starts to bend over before watering.
I dont think my okra has drooped but maybe 4 times this year in almost 100F/37C degree heat.
When I turned on the drip it hasn't drooped one time.
One hour in the morning and one hour in the evening.
Then I come home and hand water it.
This allows the okra to get huge but still tender.
I think the stuff could grow in a swamp.
Worth
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Old 1 Week Ago   #8
gorbelly
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I've always started my C. annuum peppers around the same time as my tomatoes, and it's been fine. This year, I'm trying a bunch of C. chinense, and I made the rookie mistake of treating them like C. annuum. They really need to be started much, much earlier.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9
dmforcier
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I assume you will be starting the Solanaceae indoors under lights. Most peppers, especially C.chinense, as early as you can - up to a month before starting tomatoes (I go two weeks). The pods take a long time to ripen. How early depends on how many 12" plants you can keep indoors at a time. Can't speak to the okra and eggplant.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #10
Antipodean
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Default Thank you!

A big thank you to all your replies, the info and ideas have been great.

I'm probably running behind on the peppers, but i'll get them started tomorrow as I have the day off work (yippee!).

I use a combination of indoor lighting and just putting them outside depending on the weather - today for example is 20 (68f) and sunny and its the middle of winter!

Bye for now!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #11
Gardeneer
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Start peppers at least 3 weeks before tomatoes.

I direct sow cukes and okra. Or just germinate them in cold frame.
I plant cukes about 2-3 weeks after planting out tomatoes and pepper in the garden .
Okra even couple of weeks later.
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