Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Discuss your tips, tricks and experiences growing and selling vegetables, fruits, flowers, plants and herbs.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old July 30, 2015   #16
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,596
Default

I refuse to take the time to pick cherries, and my time does count too. I try to utilize it in areas that provide the greatest potential. everything else is secondary, and evolves around the main production crop. In my case that is beefsteaks, the pounds pile up very fast, and I cannot grow enough. I don't waste time pursuing crops that barely matter when the bucks are counted, labor time calculated in, fertilizer costs, electrical and heat too, I had better be getting some poundage to stay afloat.
Tomatoes grown in a greenhouse should not need to be washed, outside maybe, if they are dirty, wipe them off.
AKmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #17
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,709
Default

Just curious, what's your favorite beefsteak for market AK?
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #18
Salsacharley
Tomatovillian™
 
Salsacharley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 1,514
Default

Today my daughter in law and I finished picking maters for today's market. It took us 5 hours. Here's a shot of what we got. A vast array of cherry varieties is kind of my niche. That's why so many cherries and why I can get $5/pint for them.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSCF0149.JPG (464.9 KB, 185 views)
Salsacharley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #19
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 3,104
Default

Those are beautiful tomatoes... but I agree, 5 hours to pick is insanity... and on your hands and knees to boot. Invest in a roll of concrete wire and make cages. You can get about 30 cages out of a 100' roll of wire if you make them 5 foot tall. you will get fewer cages if you make them 6 foot tall but it may be worth the difference when your cherry tomatoes grow over the tops of the cages and flop over.. In the Fall when you are cleaning up stack the cages on their sides in a pyramid with stakes at the end or a board in the bottom to keep them stable and stack them on ground cover, not on grass or bare dirt or you will have a jungle of weeds to get them out of when you are ready for them in the Spring if you don't.

In 5 hours I had better have bushels picked.
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #20
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,358
Default

I agree, very pretty pic.

I go to two markets that I think represent two very different customer bases. One market has largely senior citizen customers, and I'm sure a much lower mean score on any socioeconomic scale. The other market is noticeably more affluent. It is next to the local university. We get a lot of customers who have good jobs and disposable income.

I had pints of Bosque Blue Bumble Bee tomatoes, which are a large cherry, not quite a saladette, priced at $2.50. At one market, they flew off the table, and at the other, they didn't sell at all, even though just about every person who walked by would stop and compliment me on how beautiful they were...and then walk down to buy from the guy selling $1/lb hybrid slicers.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #21
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,709
Default

At my markets cherry tomatoes are very scarce and from what I have been told most people buy them from small growers prepackaged. I guess time/space issues are why.

Quote:
they didn't sell at all, even though just about every person who walked by would stop and compliment me on how beautiful they were...and then walk down to buy from the guy selling $1/lb hybrid slicers.
This is exactly my situation here, if everyone who said they were pretty bought them I'd be much better off.

Last edited by BigVanVader; July 30, 2015 at 04:30 PM.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #22
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,389
Default

Wow, Salsacharley, that is a beautiful spread of cherries!
My farmer friend has one greenhouse just for cherries - 50 plants. They're pruned to a single stem in the beginning and tied up to overhead beams. By the time they're grown the space between rows is pretty narrow - but the cherries are all within reach without crawling. Still she has commented to me that she should charge more for cherries because of the pick time. Her customers want them, as you say there is certainly demand.

Last year there was an extra row of cherries in the other greenhouse that wasn't pruned much if at all... and I know what you mean about crawling.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #23
Fred Hempel
Tomatovillian™
 
Fred Hempel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Sunol, CA
Posts: 1,992
Default

Cherries are harder to pick, but the loss is much less.

About 95% of the cherry tomatoes we pick can be sold as "firsts"

About 50% of the beefsteak tomatoes can be sold as firsts.

About 85% of the small-to-medium round can be sold as firsts, and this is one reason why I am very interested in creating new tomatoes in this category.
Fred Hempel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30, 2015   #24
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,596
Default tomatoes

BigVanVader, my favorite is hard to say, but Delicious is pretty, huge yields, huuuge fruit on average, and they do taste very good, Chapman tastes best for my red market tomato, Andrew Rahart's is equally as good and pretty, these are red. Crnkovic Yugoslavian and Eva Purple ball are very nice looking excellent tasting pink and purple beefsteaks.
Chapman, Andrew R, rest of pics Delicious, and a pic of coiled picked vines after lowering plants, this practice keeps long season crops producing.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg SANY0058.JPG (352.4 KB, 175 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0057.JPG (386.8 KB, 175 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0037.JPG (384.8 KB, 173 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0042.JPG (359.9 KB, 176 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0039.JPG (356.3 KB, 176 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0038.JPG (373.4 KB, 176 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0035.JPG (360.0 KB, 178 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0041.JPG (382.5 KB, 178 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0044.JPG (371.3 KB, 177 views)
File Type: jpg SANY0043.JPG (377.8 KB, 179 views)

Last edited by AKmark; July 30, 2015 at 09:12 PM.
AKmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 18, 2015   #25
AZGardener
Tomatovillian™
 
AZGardener's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Zone 9b Phoenix,AZ
Posts: 390
Default

I am reading this thread with envy and taking note. I am just a backyard grower but I will have a farm one day! I would think that charging $5 for a beautiful pint of mixed cherry maters is right on. The grocery store charges 3.50-4.50 for that mini pint and those aren't artisin by any means. I would think one could make a nice buck with 70+ cherry plants due to the size harvest and variety. This year I grew 8 or so types of cherries and the harvest was crazy. My daughter wanted to have a lemonade and tomato stand
__________________
Kelly from Phx, AZ
Toes and Tomatoes on FB
AZGardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 18, 2015   #26
joseph
Tomatovillian™
 
joseph's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Cache Valley, N/E of The Great Salt Lake
Posts: 1,176
Default

I live in a community where most people are required by religious edict to grow a garden. And even those not bound by the religious edict are still influenced by the community mores, and family history. And since cherry tomatoes grow reliably in this area, a lot of them get planted!!! Then they are given away to anyone that will take them to comply with the mantra of "Don't waste food".

It's hard as a farmer to compete with the church.
joseph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20, 2015   #27
Keger
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Richmond, TX
Posts: 327
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AKmark View Post
I refuse to take the time to pick cherries, and my time does count too. I try to utilize it in areas that provide the greatest potential. everything else is secondary, and evolves around the main production crop. In my case that is beefsteaks, the pounds pile up very fast, and I cannot grow enough. I don't waste time pursuing crops that barely matter when the bucks are counted, labor time calculated in, fertilizer costs, electrical and heat too, I had better be getting some poundage to stay afloat.
Tomatoes grown in a greenhouse should not need to be washed, outside maybe, if they are dirty, wipe them off.
Agree with all you say. Down here in the heat we can produce small tomatoes when the big ones wont make, but it is still not worth it, if you want to make any money.

I have to build shade houses for summer, with fans. Think I'll put up a new thread and see if anybody has tried.
Keger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20, 2015   #28
Keger
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Richmond, TX
Posts: 327
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AKmark View Post
BigVanVader, my favorite is hard to say, but Delicious is pretty, huge yields, huuuge fruit on average, and they do taste very good, Chapman tastes best for my red market tomato, Andrew Rahart's is equally as good and pretty, these are red. Crnkovic Yugoslavian and Eva Purple ball are very nice looking excellent tasting pink and purple beefsteaks.
Chapman, Andrew R, rest of pics Delicious, and a pic of coiled picked vines after lowering plants, this practice keeps long season crops producing.
Your setup is awesome AK. Very impressed. What size bags do you like for your tomatoes? If it's ok to ask what about the growing medium? Thanks.
Keger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 21, 2015   #29
ilex
Tomatovillian™
 
ilex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Spain
Posts: 399
Default

I would look for or breed some that fall when ripe or shaken and use nets below the plants. Some currants are grown like that.
ilex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 21, 2015   #30
joseph
Tomatovillian™
 
joseph's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Cache Valley, N/E of The Great Salt Lake
Posts: 1,176
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ilex View Post
I would look for or breed some that fall when ripe or shaken and use nets below the plants. Some currants are grown like that.
I grew a cross between wild tomato and domestic tomato that had that trait. I really liked the idea. Seemed like it would be a good harvesting strategy....
joseph is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:15 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★