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Old February 25, 2016   #31
twillis2252
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LOL! Believe I have put on a pound just reading this thread...
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Old February 25, 2016   #32
PureHarvest
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Originally Posted by twillis2252 View Post
LOL! Believe I have put on a pound just reading this thread...
Healthy fat does not make you fat.
You burn it for energy.

Lots of Carbs and sugar (the majority of a lot of people's intake) make you fat.

Sugar has to go through 24 steps to be digested. And when you over-do it, it is stored as fat.
C-8 MCT oil goes through 2 steps.
Doesn't even involve your liver. Straight to the brain for instant energy. No fat storage.

Now don't think you can eat 2lbs of fatty Rib-eye or 12 ounces of MCT oil and that is a good thing.

Cole, which Coconut oil do u use?
Consider that the long chain (C12) fatty acids in regular coconut oil are not ideal
Medium Chain are best (hence MCT), or C-8 and C-10.
They centrifuge the oil and the short and long chain acids are stripped out if memory serves, leaving the mediums. Costs more to do, but worth it IMO.

Last edited by PureHarvest; February 25, 2016 at 02:56 PM.
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Old February 25, 2016   #33
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I bought a pile of fat back some time ago and made some of the most beautiful white lard with it in a big cast iron kettle.

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Old February 25, 2016   #34
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Yes!
THE best for cooking with, unlike all of the misled folks who cook with olive oil!
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Old February 25, 2016   #35
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Best cheese comes from Wisconsin. We take home the most awards in cheese competitions! CA still hasn't figured out that you don't age cheese in oak barrels
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Old February 25, 2016   #36
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Best cheese comes from Wisconsin. We take home the most awards in cheese competitions! CA still hasn't figured out that you don't age cheese in oak barrels
Aint that the truth.
And New York State and Texas makes some pretty good wine but you never hear about it that much.

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Old February 25, 2016   #37
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I drink my coffee hot and black...... don't put anything in it. By the way I drink regular coffee, no decaf here. Make a 12 cup pot in the mourning and 8 cup pot in the afternoon.

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Old February 26, 2016   #38
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We've got just a bit off topic here, haven't we?

At my Farmer's Market, I start off at $3.50 a pound for early, greenhouse-grown tomatoes, and drop it to $3.00 a pound in the height of the season. That goes for everything - cherries and big-uns. Even so, I grow way more than I can sell, so I dehydrate the extras, and sell them all year. I've been surprised at how many I sell even in the height of fresh tomato season! They are just sliced and dried, with a light sprinkle of sea salt, I bag them up in sandwich bags (.2 lb.), and sell for $3.00 a bag.
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Old February 26, 2016   #39
Ricky Shaw
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The price that most surprised me most last year was AKmark in Alaska, I believe he said $3.99 a pound. Milk is like $6 a gallon up there.
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Old February 26, 2016   #40
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Several certified organic get $4-5 per pound here. I call mine certified poorganic.
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Old March 4, 2016   #41
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I have a unique situation where I sell my heirloom tomatoes to a gentleman who runs a high end farmers market. He buys pretty much every tomato I can grow for $2.50 pound. I started out setting up at a farmers market, and couldn't compete with the folks who buy the imported stuff (non heirlooms). I asked the guy who had the upscale farmers market about setting up there since he too was an heirloom tomato fan and when he asked what price I was going to sell them, he offered to buy mine every week for $2.50 pound. He sells them for $4.50 pound.

This year, I am growing four times more tomatoes and many more varieties. I plan on selling him slicers for $2.50 pound and the cherries & salads for $3.00 pound bulk.

I feel very fortunate to have a situation like this as I only deal with one entity and deliver 1-2 times a week. I also don't have to tie up a bunch of time setting up and waiting for customers. I do volunteer some time at the market answering questions about the varieties and helping him set things up. His staff doesn't know much about the varieties, so I help sort out and help with the tags.

Joe
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Old March 4, 2016   #42
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Tomatoes here sell for $10 a kilo, that's close to $5 a lb, and that price has been stable for a couple of years so I expect the same at least in 2016. I don't have to lift a finger to market tomatoes, my farmer friend will buy anything I'm willing to sell, if other folks don't put dibs on them first (which they do!). The demand far exceeds supply for local tomatoes. Wish I had a bigger greenhouse!

Mind you, the supermarket tomatoes are going for 4.50 or $5 a lb anyway! So a fresh one at that price is a great deal.
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Old March 5, 2016   #43
BigVanVader
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Any property for sale near you? Kinda joking...but America is getting pretty nuts.
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Old March 5, 2016   #44
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It's all about supply and demand as well as the cost of living in your area.
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Old March 5, 2016   #45
bower
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigVanVader View Post
Any property for sale near you? Kinda joking...but America is getting pretty nuts.
Population here is low, so lots and lots of wild undeveloped land, even some 'former farms' can be found for sale occasionally if you look further from the city. There's even some agricultural land near the city not in use, it's possible to lease but not buy it. In general real estate near the city has gotten crazy overpriced because of oil offshore. Also in the past decades, some agricultural land near the city has gotten rezoned and gobbled up for subdivisions. This is really bad, because we don't have anything like the normal basic soil resource for agriculture. Land that was already farmed means farmland 'created' here.. the glaciers that retreated only 10,000 years ago took the topsoil with em and dumped it on the Grand Banks. You find some acid clay on ridges, elsewhere it can be straight up rocks pretty much. So looking for land to develop a farm, you would want to look very closely before you buy. And plan to include animals, for the soil building benefits. It's a frontier situation, for farms.
The bigger problem for tomatoes is that greenhouse space is expensive to build and maintain, and you really need that to get a decent crop for your effort. I think there are ways to do better, maybe make it more profitable with some further work and innovation. Of course, there's lots of demand for other produce too. No shortage of market for any local vegs, and all the cool weather crops are easy.

On the other hand, for the 'place is too nuts' issue, Newfoundland is still a great place to raise a family if you're not too ambitious to get rich. Very laid back, friendly folks, there are problems in the city now but nothing compared to the continent. You should visit some time and check it out. Bring the little one over for a gulp of the really fresh air.
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