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Old July 21, 2016   #1
My Foot Smells
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Default Ugly Fruit

Watched a segment on the local news about ugly produce from a Wal-Mart rep. Obv. ugly fruit is not allowed, even in most of the farmer market type arrangements. There are governing bylaws about ugly fruit.

Generally, there is nothing wrong with ugly fruit. The report indicated that almost 50% of produce goes to waste due to this phenom. That is simply amazing.

Maybe ugly fruit is best ate in the dark when no one is looking?

What do you do with all your ugly fruit? Does your market have sanctions against selling. Seems like we could feed the world with discarded ugly fruit...........

I admit, I use the "uglies" for canning and sauces myself.

<edit: here is the article reporting that Wal-Mart is going to be selling ugly fruit, which I think is a great idea>

Over the past few years, so-called ugly fruit and vegetables have been gaining a host of admirers.
Now, Wal-Mart has officially joined the bandwagon. Starting this week, America's largest grocer says it is piloting sales of weather-dented apples at a discount in 300 of its stores in Florida. If this were one of those Hollywood movies where the mousy girl gets a dramatic makeover, this would probably be the scene where she gets asked to the prom (minus the sexist subtext).
"We're excited to announce that after months of discussion, a brand of apples from Washington state, called "I'm Perfect," will make its debut in Walmart stores this week," Shawn Baldwin, senior vice president for global food sourcing, produce and floral for Wal-Mart U.S., writes in a company blog post. He adds, "We're proud to be the first retailer to bring these apples to you." The apples will be sold in 2- and 5-pound bags, he says.
Ugly fruits and vegetables are a fact of life on the farm. Sometimes the dents and scars are so minor that you wouldn't think twice about buying them. They're perfectly edible, delicious and just as nutritious as their unmarred brethren — or perhaps even more so. But their cosmetic challenges (think hail-pocked apples or curvy leeks) have traditionally kept them out of retail stores.
Imperfect produce often ends up in landfills instead, contributing to food waste, which, in turn, is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions.
The Salt

Beneath An Ugly Outside, Marred Fruit May Pack More Nutrition




Across the U.S., there's no good documentation of how much produce gets tossed because of cosmetic imperfections, and losses vary from crop to crop, says JoAnne Berkenkamp, a senior advocate for food and agriculture at the Natural Resources Defense Council. But "we've typically found that growers reported [cosmetic-related] losses ranging up to 20 percent of production in a given year, but it could be higher in years of bad weather."
For apples, blemish-related losses can reach as high as 30 percent, according to data from Columbia Marketing International that Wal-Mart cites.
The Salt

This Is What A Feast For 5,000 Made From Food Waste Looks Like




But efforts to help consumers and U.S. retailers see the inner beauty of gnarly produce have stepped up of late. In March, as we've reported, Giant Eagle announced a small pilot program to sell less-than-perfect produce at a discount in its Pittsburgh-area stores, and Whole Foods announced a similar effort in its Northern California outlets. But, as Berkenkamp notes, "it's hard to get bigger than Wal-Mart."
Wal-Mart has more than 4,000 U.S. stores. So it has the potential to "completely change the market," says Jordan Figueiredo, founder of the @UglyFruitAndVeg Campaign, which uses humor to raise awareness of food waste.
The Salt

Silly, Saucy, Scary: Photos Show The Many Faces Of Ugly Fruit




In fact, Wal-Mart has been testing sales of uglies since late April, when it started marketing "Spuglies" — a brand of weather-damaged potatoes — in its Texas stores. "They're still on shelves" in some 400 stores in the state, says Wal-Mart spokesman John Forrest Ales. He says Wal-Mart doesn't make public how many pounds of spuds have been sold under the Spuglies program, but "we're hearing good things about it from our customers."
The "I'm Perfect" apples and "Spuglies" potato programs are a "good step," says Figueiredo. But he wants the grocery behemoth to expand the program with more produce available year-round and in more states — and perhaps, a cheeky marketing campaign that glorifies the crazy and curious shapes that crops can take.
The Salt

Think Nobody Wants To Buy Ugly Fruits And Veggies? Think Again




Figueiredo is one of the organizers of a Change.org petition with more than 143,000 signatures urging Wal-Mart to sell ugly produce, and he visited Bentonville, Ark., on Wednesday to deliver it in person to the company's headquarters. (Whole Foods' decision to test sales of ugly produce followed a similar petition that Figueiredo organized.)
Figueiredo notes that earlier this year, Wal-Mart's UK grocery chain, Asda, began selling "wonky veg" boxes — each containing 11 pounds of various misshapen fruits and vegetables — in hundreds of stores. The boxes, which sell for the equivalent of $4.60, have proved popular. He'd like to see Wal-Mart launch a similar program across the U.S.
That's not currently in the cards, says Wal-Mart's John Forrest Ales, but the company is looking at various ways to expand its offerings of ugly produce.
"All of our conversations are about, how do we maximize the harvest?" he says. The challenge though, he says, is creating an efficient infrastructure and network that can scoop up enough misfit produce from farmers to meet demand and get it to the stores before it goes bad.

Last edited by My Foot Smells; July 21, 2016 at 09:02 AM.
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Old July 21, 2016   #2
Urbanheirlooms
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I use my "uglies" as well for salsa, sauces, ect. I also offer them for discounted prices. In the heirloom world, it is rare to have perfect looking fruit especially when you don't use pesticides or fertilizers like I grow them. R & R's not so much.

It is truly a shame that there are so many people in this world who are starving and so much food gets wasted based on the appearance of the item. It is also a shame that people don't understand that by having that perfect looking fruit/vegetables, they are giving up flavor.
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Old July 21, 2016   #3
My Foot Smells
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the "uses humor" section in the article is mildly entertaining.

I agree UH. It amazes me that ppl do not have to disclose use of pesticides and insecticides in selling fruit. The connotation is derived that a home grown tomato is generally grown by organic means - for the most part. But often times, that is not the case. Chemicals are at the disposal of the home gardening these days and sometimes used in excess.

Probably not a question many buyers would ask (I would and have) about the use of non-org stuff. It is one of the primary reasons I grow my own vegetables to know what I am actually getting. Simply grabbing something off the grocery store shelf, one has no idea what methods were applied, even if it is labeled, "organic."

The pursuit of the perfect looking fruit or mass production by any means, may very well be killing us.
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Old July 21, 2016   #4
GrowingCoastal
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" Probably not a question many buyers would ask (I would and have) about the use of non-org stuff. It is one of the primary reasons I grow my own vegetables to know what I am actually getting. Simply grabbing something off the grocery store shelf, one has no idea what methods were applied, even if it is labeled, "organic." "

Yes. I once asked about the crust of a homemade pie at a farmer's market. The pie was labeled as an organic apple pie. The apples were but the crust was not. So, is it an 'organic' pie? Nope.
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Old July 21, 2016   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by My Foot Smells View Post
the "uses humor" section in the article is mildly entertaining.

I agree UH. It amazes me that ppl do not have to disclose use of pesticides and insecticides in selling fruit. The connotation is derived that a home grown tomato is generally grown by organic means - for the most part. But often times, that is not the case. Chemicals are at the disposal of the home gardening these days and sometimes used in excess.

Probably not a question many buyers would ask (I would and have) about the use of non-org stuff. It is one of the primary reasons I grow my own vegetables to know what I am actually getting. Simply grabbing something off the grocery store shelf, one has no idea what methods were applied, even if it is labeled, "organic."

The pursuit of the perfect looking fruit or mass production by any means, may very well be killing us.
You say " The pursuit of the perfect looking fruit or mass production by any means, may very well be killing us". I agree completely. You often hear people say my grandparents used to eat fatty foods and use lard and use lots of butter, ect and they lived to be in their 80's-90's and I am sure that is true to some extent. I believe that many of the newer pesticides, fertilizers and preservatives used today is what leads to health issues. The longevity thing kind of offsets as our older generation people were not subject to the bad stuff, but health care technology has improved.
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Old July 29, 2016   #6
BigVanVader
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What is considered unmarketable produce I sell the same as the pretty. My customers know to come early for better selection.
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Old July 29, 2016   #7
swellcat
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Default The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Quote:
It is truly a shame that there are so many people in this world who are starving and so much food gets wasted based on the appearance of the item.
That's the real ugly, right there.
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Old July 29, 2016   #8
Ricky Shaw
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I think that's the thrust behind these programs and grants for small grower greenhouses and tunnels. You put the fresh produce closer to the communities, cutting shipping and spoilage. Cutting waste by staying local.
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Old July 29, 2016   #9
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You'd be amased at how many people buying pre-made mashed potatoes will complain about dark spots or eyes. They claim the occasional eye is an insect.

I once got a complaint from a guy that complained about germs because he found a small piece of glove in his mashed potatoes. He wasn't concerned that he had foreign material. He was concerned about germs. He went on and on in his written complaint about knowing that the potatoes were cooked and heat killed germs but that there were still germs on people's hands and by extension the glove. He obviously didn't know that potatoes grow in the "dirty" germ-loaded ground. I think he may have had a heart attack if he were to find out how organic products are fertilized.
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Old July 29, 2016   #10
bower
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If the ugly is right, we sometimes use our crazed vegetables as the centerpiece or decoration for a special dinner party. Takes a bit of extra effort to clean eg a mutant carrot or potato, but the visual effect can be very pleasing. To us, anyway.
I had a wonderful sack of russet potatoes last year, that were fused in all sorts of ways. We roasted them whole and they made a supremely beautiful dish.
Ugly tomatoes are a bit more tricky, as they often have uneven ripening or just such a scarry surface it's not appealing to eat without resorting to the sauce pot.
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Old July 29, 2016   #11
swellcat
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https://www.change.org/p/whole-foods...e-in-the-us-31

Glad a number of folks are pushing back against waste and irrationality.
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Old July 29, 2016   #12
AKmark
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I sell them in bulk as # 2's for canning etc for about half price. They always sell.
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Old July 29, 2016   #13
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I still sell them. Usually for a reduced amount but I don't throw all of it away... just some of it. I can't begin to use it all and I can't sell it all before some of it goes bad.
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Old July 29, 2016   #14
Cole_Robbie
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Everything at the farmer's market gets sprayed when being raised. If it is not labelled organic, then it was raised on Sevin, Daconil, and probably Malathion. And those are at a minimum. A lot of fruit requires sprays that the state mandates one have a spray license to buy. There are a few vendors who do raise produce all-naturally, but generally they don't have much selection or quantity.

That's an unfortunate situation, but it is the customers who have created it. Everyone says they don't like pesticide, but no one will buy produce with bug damage.
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Old July 29, 2016   #15
Worth1
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Did you guys know there are websites out there for only beautiful people.
If you gain weight or otherwise dont meet the criteria your are booted out.
Then there is the hot or not thing you can go to and put you pictuer up and people click hot or not.
The I'm smarter than everyone else clubs and on line IQ testes.
I saw one guy flop big time taking one of them and it practically killed him he was so tore up.
I was asked to take it amd I told them I wasnt goitn to and I didnt care.
Why not?
Because I dont care.
Common take it.
No.

The people of some countries are hung up on good looks and intelligence while other people are starving.
I was raised with all the food I could possibly eat and will still eat an apple brown spots label and all.
People toss out bananas I will eat.
Even to this day the only part of an apple I wont eat is the stem.
I eat the core including the seeds.
Did you just eat the core of that apple?
Yep.
Did you just eat the mold on that cheese?
Yep.

Did you just eat the rind from that orange lemon or lime?
Yep.
My mother had to stop me from eating peanut hulls and I still do from time to time.

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