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Old February 10, 2009   #46
coronabarb
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Someone should invite/hire brokenbar to cook at their next tomato tasting.

happydog, the key is practice, practice, practice! You can always feed the duds to the chickens, LOL!
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Old February 10, 2009   #47
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I put myself through college and vet school (back in the dark ages...) as a chef for a very upscale Italian restaurant that did a lot of catering. I do this dinner for 26 every year (we are missing one wife this year as she had a symposium to attend for her work and she tried like heck to get out of it!) My livingroom is 52 feet long so I can easily accomodate banquet tables. Could not do it without my husband and adult son (they do the Prime Rib) as they serve and remove courses while I am dishing them up. It is a challenge to get the food out to that many people at the same time and have it be either hot or cold, depending on what it is! Lots of the stuff in this menu can be made ahead of time which is a huge plus. I am having this on Valentines day so I am baking the shredded potato cups today, making the dessert ,baking the bread and making the soup which I will add the Tortollini too right before serving. (and I already did the chicken parmigiana Neopolitano.) So party day, it's just adding the whipped cream and toffee bits to the dessert, making the salad and making Sun Dried Tomato Pate and Quacamole dip for the hors d'oeuvres (I don't give them too much...they have a lot of food to eat!) Running all stemware through Dishwasher tomorrow and unpacking all the china (I have service for 36...) I really have a lot of fun doing this every year, no matter how much I complain about it!
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Old February 10, 2009   #48
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You are a vet too??? You are a gal of many talents!! (can I send you my doggy/chicken/turkey questions?) - just kidding!

Just know we now hold you in awe! and wish we lived closer to you.
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Old February 10, 2009   #49
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Retired and I was an equine reproductive vet...Stood 7 stallions for owners, shipped and received semen from all over the world and bred about 250 mares a year. I was getting burned out and then our own stallion died and it just broke my heart...I could not even go outside. Sold all my mares (one owner in Nevada bought them all and she sends pics and stuff so it is nice.) Plus...my husband started his own business, "The Mobile Mechanic" and he got so busy, he could not help like before and I am really a pain-in-the-behind to work for as I am like Type A to the nnnntttthhhh degree and way to anal and basically a crabby beach. I love my animals too much and I will not have any more. Have an old (24 years) Siamese cat and one wild barn cat that I trapped, neutered and gave him his shots and let him go. No more animals for me...just too painful. PLUS...we are traveling (went to Rome and then took a cruise around the Mediterranean and sailed across Atlantic to Florida) in November and next year we are going to Egypt (life-long dream...I am an admitted Egypto-phile.) None of this has anything to do with tomatoes...but I LOVE "EM and that's all I grow. Would have 1000 plants if I had the stamina. I have a sun-dried tomato business that keeps me hopping in the summer. I must have at least 500 sun dried tomato recipes.
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Old February 11, 2009   #50
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I share your passion for Egypt, i would love to go there someday, and that would be my dream trip.
Make sure to take lots of pics, so we can have a peek.
I printed off your recipes, and showed them to my husband, my goodness they looks yummy!!
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Old February 16, 2009   #51
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Default Carnitas with Pico De Gallo (with tomatillos and tomatoes)

The great part about this is that it cooks in a crock pot (I wish everything did!) My family and friends love this.
INGREDIENTS

PORK
1 tablespoon olive oil
6 pounds boneless pork shoulder
1 cup ground cumin
4 dried chiles (your choice of hot) , seeded and cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1 onion, quartered
6 cloves garlic, halved
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
6 cups water

PICO DE GALLO
6 tomatoes, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 tomatillos, husked and chopped
2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
1/3 cup lime juice
1 tablespoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
DIRECTIONS
Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Sear the pork in the hot oil until browned on all sides, about 10 minutes. Place into a slow cooker along with the cumin, New Mexico chiles, quartered onion, garlic, and 1 minced jalapeno pepper. Pour in the water, cover, and cook on High for 6 to 8 hours, then reduce heat to Low and cook until the pork is tender and easily shredded, 12 to 16 hours more. Once cooked, remove the pork and vegetables to a large bowl and shred finely with two forks. Mix in enough cooking liquid to moisten the meat to your taste.
  1. Prepare the pico de gallo 2 to 6 hours before the carnitas will be ready. Combine the tomatoes, onion, tomatillos, and 2 minced jalapeno peppers in a mixing bowl. Season with lime juice, salt, and pepper. Mix well, and refrigerate until ready to serve.
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Old February 16, 2009   #52
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Default Grilled Skirt Steaks with Tomatillos (Two Ways)

For tomatillo salsa:

4 pasillas de Oaxaca (dried smoked chiles), wiped clean
1 pound fresh tomatillos, husked and rinsed, then quartered
1 cup packed cilantro sprigs
2 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon packed dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon molasses (not blackstrap)
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/3 cup vegetable oil

For steaks and tomatillo salad:

1/4 cup vegetable oil, divided
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1 3/4 pounds skirt steak, halved (or London Broil or Flank Steak)
1/2 pound fresh tomatillos, husked and rinsed
1 cup cilantro leaves
2 teaspoons finely chopped shallot
2 teaspoons fresh lime juice

Make salsa:
Slit chiles lengthwise, then stem and seed. Heat a dry heavy skillet (not nonstick) over medium heat until hot, then toast chiles, opened flat, turning and pressing with tongs, until more pliable and slightly changed in color, about 1 minute. Cover chiles with hot water in a bowl and soak until softened, about 20 minutes, then drain.
Purée chiles, tomatillos, cilantro, garlic, brown sugar, molasses, cumin, and 1 teaspoon salt in a blender until smooth, about 1 minute.
Heat oil in a 10-inch heavy skillet over medium-high heat until it shimmers, then cook salsa (it will spatter), stirring occasionally, until slightly thicker, 5 to 8 minutes.

Grill steaks:
Prepare a grill for direct-heat cooking over hot charcoal (high heat for gas)
Whisk together 2 tablespoons oil, cumin, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, and 1 tsp pepper, then coat steaks.
Oil grill rack, then grill steaks, covered only if using a gas grill, turning once, until grill marks appear, 4 to 6 minutes total for medium-rare. Let steaks rest on a cutting board, loosely covered with foil, 10 minutes.

Make salad while steaks rest:
Thinly slice tomatillos and toss with cilantro, shallot, lime juice, remaining 2 tablespoons oil, and salt and pepper to taste.
Cut steaks into VERY thin strips crosswise and top with salsa and salad.

Salsa can be made ahead of time and warmed up right before use.

*The skirt steak is the diaphragm muscle. It is a long, flat piece of meat, with a tendency toward toughness. But it has good flavor. It can be grilled or pan fried quickly with good results. Another traditional method is to stuff it, roll it, and braise it. In many areas of the country (Texas, for example) skirt steak is the only cut to be used when making "real" fajitas
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Old February 16, 2009   #53
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Default Seared Salmon with Tomatillo Coulis (tomatoes, peppers)

Serve this salmon over a salad of romaine hearts, artichoke hearts, radishes, green beans, cucumber, potatoes, celery, scallion, olives, tomatoes, and basil with a dressing of lime juice and olive oil. I don't eat meat so this is one of my favorite recipes.

For tomatillo Coulis
1 small red onion
1/4 pound fresh tomatillos
1 fresh green Anaheim chile
1 fresh poblano chile
3 unpeeled garlic cloves
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 scant cup cilantro sprigs
1 scant cup packed fresh spinach leaves
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
about 1/4 cup water

four 5-ounce pieces salmon fillet with skin
12 fresh basil leaves
1 teaspoon Sichuan peppercorns
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1 tablespoon olive oil

Make coulis: Preheat oven to 400°F.
Quarter onion. In a shallow baking pan toss onion, tomatillos (in husks), chiles, and garlic cloves with 2 tablespoons olive oil until coated. Roast vegetables in middle of oven until tender, about 25 minutes.
Wearing rubber gloves, peel chiles. Cut off tops of chiles and remove seeds and ribs. Discard husks from tomatillos and peel garlic. In a blender purée roasted vegetables and all remaining coulis ingredients except water, adding just enough water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if necessary to facilitate blending. Season coulis with salt.
With a paring knife make 3 slits in top of each salmon fillet and stuff each with a basil leaf. With a mortar and pestle or an electric coffee/spice grinder coarsely grind peppercorns. Brush salmon with extra-virgin olive oil and sprinkle with ground peppercorns and sea salt. In a large nonstick skillet heat olive oil over high heat until hot but not smoking and sear salmon fillets, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides and just cooked through, about 7 minutes total. Serve salmon with coulis.
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Old February 16, 2009   #54
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Default Oaxacan Lamb in Spicy Tomatillo Sauce

I have not made this but a close friend did and she said it was "to die for".

In Chalcatongo, natives slow pit-roast lamb, then warm up the meat in a simple tomatillo sauce rich with the earthy zing of costeño rojo chiles. Alternative slow-raost method below.

1/4 ounce dried avocado leaves (can't find these locally so left out.)
4 lamb shanks (about 4 pounds total)
2 oz dried costeño rojo chiles, wiped clean
2 1/4 pounds fresh tomatillos, husked and rinsed
2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
2 1/2 cups chopped cilantro
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Accompaniment:
warm corn tortillas

Preheat oven to 300°F with rack in middle.
Put avocado leaves in bottom of a heavy medium pot with a tight-fitting lid. Sprinkle lamb shanks all over with 2 teaspoons salt and arrange in pot (they don't have to be in 1 layer). Roast, covered, until meat is very tender, about 3 hours.
Meanwhile, slit chiles lengthwise, then stem, seed, and devein. Tear chiles into roughly 1-inch pieces (you should have about 1 1/2 cups). Heat a comal or large heavy skillet (not nonstick) over medium heat until hot, then toast chiles, stirring constantly, until more pliable and slightly changed in color, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. (Chiles will crisp as they cool.)
Cover tomatillos with water in a medium saucepan and simmer, uncovered, until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain well, then purée with chiles, garlic, cilantro, and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt in a blender (in batches if necessary) until chiles are ground to small flecks.
Transfer shanks to a cutting board to cool. Strain lamb juices remaining in pot into a glass measuring cup. Let fat rise to top and skim off. Coarsely shred meat, discarding bones.
Heat oil in a heavy medium pot over medium-high heat until it shimmers, then cook one fourth of tomatillo sauce (it will spatter), stirring, until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Add remaining sauce and lamb juices and simmer, stirring occasionally, 10 minutes. Add lamb. Thin sauce with water if necessary. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 4 minutes.
·Lamb can be roasted and shredded 3 days ahead and chilled. Chill juices separately; discard solidified fat.
·Lamb in sauce can be made 2 days ahead and chilled (covered once cool).
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Old February 16, 2009   #55
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Default Ancho Chile Fettuccini with Cilantro-Tomatillo Cream Sauce

Made this for a friend's birthday and it was a huge hit and everyone wanted the recipe.

Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
3 ancho chiles, stemmed and seeded
4 cloves unpeeled garlic
2 eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt

1 bunch chopped fresh cilantro
3 tomatillos, husked and chopped
1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped
1/2 cup cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
salt and pepper to taste
  1. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Roast ancho chiles and 4 cloves unpeeled garlic. Press the chiles flat against the pan with a spatula until they begin to pop and smoke, then flip. When done, rehydrate chiles in a bowl of warm water for 30 minutes. Turn garlic until all sides are browned, about 15 minutes. Allow to cool, then peel.
  2. In a blender or food processor, combine chiles, 2 cloves roasted garlic, and eggs. Blend until smooth. Place the flour in a mound on a clean surface. Stir in 1/2 teaspoon salt with a fork, then make a well in the center. Pour in egg mixture. Working from the center outward, gradually incorporate the flour with a fork until dough is formed. Knead dough for 5 minutes, adding more flour if necessary. Prepare fettuccini according to your pasta machine's instructions. Lay the fettuccine flat on lightly floured surface for 15 minutes.
  3. In a blender or food processor, combine 2 remaining cloves roasted garlic, cilantro, tomatillos, jalapeno, cream cheese, sour cream, chicken stock, 1 tablespoon olive oil, cumin, salt and pepper. Blend until smooth. Pour into a saucepan over low heat, and cook until heated through.
  4. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or until pasta rises to the surface. Drain, and divide into serving portions; pour sauce over top.
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Old February 16, 2009   #56
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Beef and Tomatillo Tamale Casserole

This Southwestern-influenced casserole is sometimes called tamale pie, but there is really nothing pie-like about it, and the corn base is closer to polenta and grits than tamales. Many people shy away from experimenting with tomattillos, but they are wonderful in this recipe; in fact, this is a great recipe for anyone who hasn't used tomatillos before. The casserole can be made 1 or 2 days in advance before baking.

1 pound top sirloin steak, prime or choice grade, 1 inch thick
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese
1 cup grated monterey jack cheese
1 1/4 pounds tomatillos, husks removed, rinsed, cored, and quartered (about 8 large tomatillos)
1 onion, quartered
3 garlic cloves, crushed
3 cups frozen corn, thawed (or fresh)
1 teaspoon sugar
2 cups cooked black beans
2 tablespoons minced canned chipotle chile (or fresh roasted)
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
5 cups water
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 2/3 cups yellow stoneground cornmeal


TO PREPARE CASSEROLE: Season the beef with 1 tablespoon of the cumin, the salt and pepper, and rub the oil over the beef. Let sit for 30 minutes. Combine the Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheeses in a bowl and set aside. Puree the tomatillos, onion, and garlic in a food processor for about 4 minutes; the texture should still be somewhat coarse. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and toast the corn for about 7 minutes or until browned, stirring constantly. Turn down the heat to low, add the pureed tomatillo mixture with the sugar and the remaining cumin, and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until thickened. Remove from the heat and stir in the beans, chipotle chile, cilantro, and 3/4 cup of the mixed cheeses. Season with salt and pepper to taste and set aside.


TO PREPARE BEEF: Heat a skillet and sear the beef over high heat for about 1 minute on each side, until browned. Remove and let cool; the beef will be quite rare. Slice the beef across the grain 1/4 inch thick, and then cut each slice into strips about 1-1/2 inches long.

TO ASSEMBLE: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. In a large saucepan, bring the water and salt to a boil. Slowly add the cornmeal to the water, whisking constantly. Turn down the heat and simmer for about 4 minutes, until thickened,. Remove from the heat and stir in 3/4 cup of the reserved cheeses. Grease a 9 by 13-inch baking pan and spread half of the cornmeal mixture over the bottom. Spread the vegetable filling over the cornmeal. Lay out the strips of sirloin over the vegetables. Spread the remaining cornmeal mixture over the top, to within 1 inch of the edge (leaving a 1-inch border of vegetables). Sprinkle the remaining cheese around the edge of the pan. Bake the casserole for about 30 minutes, or until the surface is golden and the casserole is bubbling.
Although the recipe cals for top sirloin, any leftover cooked beef can be sliced or shredded and added. Cooked ground beef or even pork or chicken can be substituted. Add leftover cooked vegetables (especially grilled or roasted). To add a completely different flavor, substitute eggplant for the tomatillo.


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Old February 16, 2009   #57
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Boy, oh boy, do those pork carnitas sound good. I will print that one out. Wish I had some pork in the freezer, as I'm not going out in this rain. :-) Thank you so much for all your fabulous recipes. You are making this recipe section first class!
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Old February 16, 2009   #58
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Barb, I have been going through my computer cookbook and will be posting more. I have over 500 tomatillo and sun dried tomato recipes. Either I or one of my friends has prepared every one of them. "Yucky" recipes get deleted.
I really think tomatoes, tomatillos and sun dried tomatoes have not been given the attention they deserve from Chefs...I do notice however that many Chef's are looking for alternatives to old standbys and are searching for the freshest ingredients possible. I am hearing from lots of chefs (via my sun-dried tomato business) that they can't find fresh chili's of any kind in sufficient enough quantity for their uses, Alas...my sun-drieds keep me hopping and I don't have time for more than a few token pepper plants.
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Old February 16, 2009   #59
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Pasta Puttanesca For Two
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1 heaping tablespoon fresh basil
  • 6-12 pitted medium-sized kalamata olives
  • 1 heaping tablespoon capers, drained
  • 1-2 dashes of cayenne pepper (for zing, not for hotness)
  • fresh pepper
  • 1 lb fresh tomatoes, peeled, cored, and roughly chopped
  • 2 oz anchovies, drained
Combine first seven ingredients in a food processor and chop for a few seconds, long enough to make everything smallish. Put mixture in a saucepan and saute gently for two minutes. Remember olive oil burns at a lower temperature than most other oils.

Add tomatoes and anchovies. Simmer on low for about 40 minutes, or until most of the liquid is absorbed. Anchovies will dissolve fairly quickly. (With drier tomatoes, be careful. Cook time may be much less.)

Serve over linguine with grated fresh parmesan cheese.

**

Adapted from a recipe by Lidia or Delia, depending on which website was telling the truth.

Notes:
  • You may not need to add salt. Wait until you taste it.
  • Don't let the anchovies scare you. They don't dominate the flavor like they do on a pizza.
  • A little goes a long way. This makes two good-sized servings.
  • What makes the difference is good kalamata olives and fresh tomatoes. This recipe is the reason I decided to start growing tomatoes.
  • Pasta puttanesca recipes usually leave the olives intact, or chopped in half. My husband hates olives, so I ground them up the first time I made it. He loved it, but I forgot to tell him about the olives! He stopped eating it for a while when he found out. But now he's eating it again.
Christine
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Old February 17, 2009   #60
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More great recipes, thanks!
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