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Old January 23, 2017   #16
shule1
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@EPawlick

You're welcome!

@EPawlick and Cole_Robbie

Cole_Robbie does have a point about juicy tomatoes. However, juicy tomatoes don't always spoil fast compared to non-juicy tomatoes—I haven't compared them to long-keeping tomatoes. If you give them more space, they should store longer than if they're packed touching other tomatoes (that could be particularly problematic for soft or juicy tomatoes). Large tomatoes are nice, because it's easier to want to display them (rather than just store them); so, it may be easier to be willing to allocate space for them as a result. Ventilation is good (even from below the tomato, if you can manage that). Plus, it's easy to tell when big tomatoes are ripening, because they're so big.

Whatever the case, most tomatoes, regardless of variety, should store without incident as long as they're green, for the most part. After ripening, regular tomatoes may keep anywhere from a day to a few weeks, or so, in my experience (while they may stay green for three or four months at the most, although many will likely ripen much sooner). However, some tomatoes can ferment if kept ripe in storage for a good while (without looking like they've gone bad).

Fruit flies do tend to lessen the storage life of tomatoes, and other fruits, if they're around in large numbers. They'll likely go for vulnerable ripe and overripe fruits first, but they're not overly picky with ripe fruits in my experience. Even unblemished tomatoes can go bad faster with them around. I definitely recommend keeping fruit flies at a minimum, if you can. Prevention is probably the best policy here, if possible.

Some tomato breeds will split or crack upon ripening. This is one of the main things to look out for when storing tomatoes, and in deciding which kinds you want for storage. However, some tomatoes will split or crack when vine-ripened, but if picked green they won't split or crack when ripened indoors as often. I think this is because the green fruit is firmer when picked (so picking it doesn't have as much potential to damage it). Some tomato breeds still reliably split on ripening even then, though.

Brandywine (if what I had was Brandywine) definitely isn't the worst tomato for storage, if picked green, and while it might not keep ages after ripening, I think it's a good choice out of the tomatoes offered by the vendor, particularly because of its size and delay in ripening (which I did notice at my friend's house). However, taste is also an important factor, and these taste pretty good, I think.

I went and read some reviews on it. It looks like it does split for some people. My friend who grew Brandywine didn't complain about splitting or cracking. I don't believe ones I grew that were probably Brandywine cracked or split. I'm guessing the growing conditions (soil, watering, and weather) are factors here.

Oh, another thing is if the stems are difficult to remove from the tomato, it's a good idea to use scissors to cut the stems (so you won't damage the fruit by pulling hard). Keeping the stems on can also help tomatoes to be tastier and in better condition after ripening, and if stems are difficult to remove, they might be easier to tie up and hang or something as can be seen in another thread that was recently active somewhere on the site. Keeping the stems on makes tomatoes less likely to dry up, too.

Your local climate, microbes, pests, and the place you store your tomatoes may have a lot of influence on how well which tomatoes store. The rules may be different in a humid area versus an arid area, also. I think soil plays a role, too (in the integrity of the tomato); how good a tomato is at using the specific soil and set of nutrients are also important factors, in my opinion.

Last edited by shule1; January 23, 2017 at 04:49 PM.
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Old February 11, 2017   #17
ilex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EPawlick View Post
I tried Burpees Tomato Longkeepers from seed about 30 years ago and mine didn't have any taste.

Any recommendations?
De colgar tomatoes, hands down. 6-12 months storage at room temperature, and they can be delicious. If I were to make a list of the best 5 tomatoes I've ever tasted, half are "de colgar". My collection is now over 400 varieties, and I've tried a few more old varieties.

Good varieties for fresh use are perfect until mid December ... picked late July.
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Old February 11, 2017   #18
artis
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Ilex,

Would it be possible for you to share the names of the best tasting de colgar tomatoes? Can one buy seeds anywhere? I am interested in growing some this year.

Last year I grew three varieties of longkeepers and actually liked them. They had very low sugar and very high acid yet decent tomato flavor. The longest keeping for me was Clare's:
https://prseeds.ca/seed_categories/s...s/long-keeper/
Clare's lasted through the end of January. I stored them at room temperature. I suppose they could have kept even longer at lower temperatures. Mystery Keeper was the other one that stored and tasted well.
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Old February 11, 2017   #19
MissMoustache
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Anthocyanin tomatoes and tomatillos are supposed to have a storage advantage. I guess the anthocyanin may deter some rotting pathogens.
I can cofirm this from last summer. No idea which varieties though since the husband planted them for me after I sprained both wrists. I do think at least one of the plants was Lucid Gem.

We had three kinds of blue tomatoes in September 2016 that were picked green, blushing, and fully ripe. All kept for quite a while. (Longer than other tomatoes picked at the same time) The ripe ones we even took on a ten day road trip. We ate the last one the day we came home and it was only just getting a little too soft. No refrigeration or cooler and they did get a little beat up from being in a box with our cutting board, knife, and salt/pepper shakers. I think we took twelve ripe or almost ripe beefsteaks on the trip? Plus green ones for frying/grilling.

Sungold when picked green lasted until after Thanksgiving. I had two trays of them slowly blushing for months (I froze them as they ripened fully). Last time I grew Brandywine greenies lasted that long (2 plus months) slowly ripening.
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Old February 11, 2017   #20
ilex
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Originally Posted by artis View Post
Ilex,

Would it be possible for you to share the names of the best tasting de colgar tomatoes? Can one buy seeds anywhere? I am interested in growing some this year.

Last year I grew three varieties of longkeepers and actually liked them. They had very low sugar and very high acid yet decent tomato flavor. The longest keeping for me was Clare's:
https://prseeds.ca/seed_categories/s...s/long-keeper/
Clare's lasted through the end of January. I stored them at room temperature. I suppose they could have kept even longer at lower temperatures. Mystery Keeper was the other one that stored and tasted well.
I share seeds under domestic SSE's conditions for everybody, member or not.

I'm at seed sharing mode now, later in the year I'm just way too busy and get way behind.

At least "de colgar" tomatoes store better at not so cool temperatures. If it's cold for us, it's too cold for them.
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Old February 11, 2017   #21
carolyn137
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Quote:
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I share seeds under domestic SSE's conditions for everybody, member or not.

I'm at seed sharing mode now, later in the year I'm just way too busy and get way behind.

At least "de colgar" tomatoes store better at not so cool temperatures. If it's cold for us, it's too cold for them.
Artis may not know what you are referring to so let me explain.

Artis, SSE refers to Seed Savers Exchange in Iowa, and they also publish each year a Yearbook, from which SSE members can request seeds. They also publish a public catalog from which anyone can order seeds, they set the price, but in the members only Yearbook, those who are listed members set their own request prices.

Ilex has said he will send to anyone under domestic SSE's conditions. Ilex is a listed SSE member and if you want to pursue this I can try and list his conditions.

But also know that I will be listing a few de colgar ones, all from Ilex, in my next seed offer here at Tville for an SASE.

Just for reference,here is the link To SSE

https://www.google.com/search?q=seed..._AUIBygA&dpr=1

Don't click on the top one which says AD(green),click on the next one down.

SSE membership is not for everyone IMO for several reasons, I think one of the most important is having grown at least a 100 or so varieties from different sources so a person knows how to rogue out wrong varieties, and secondly there are many here at Tville who do seed offers with some rare varieties and some not.
There's a few more considerations but I won't go into that now.

Carolyn
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Old February 12, 2017   #22
artis
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Carolyn,

Thanks for the detailed instructions! I joined SSE and I think I can see Ilex's offer.



Ilex,

I sent you an email through SSE. I would like to request three varieties:
Blanco de Ibiza,
Alt Millars,
Artana 2.

Are those good varieties or are there any others that you like better?

Thanks!
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Old November 26, 2017   #23
BlackBear
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Default LongKeeperology

Hey thanks for this info. thread

I inadvertently started to be concerned again with Longkeeperology

when I harvested a whole heavy Vine of Green fruit of...

POLISH EGG...trimmed the vines and hung it up in the shop about Sept.15th..

I believe the now red toms will make it in very good shape and flavor till at least

first week of December and beyond.....

I just wish to revisit the info. and improve my technique to have at least

good "New Year's " Tomatoes ...using Longkeeper techniques and varieties.

They are of different quality and size than the small ones I would grow under lights . Any new info. advise on this subject is most welcome.
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Old November 26, 2017   #24
AlittleSalt
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Campari F1 isn't cheap but it is a long keeper. I grew out Campari F2s this year and we couldn't tell any difference in taste. They do have a long shelf life.
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Old November 27, 2017   #25
BlackBear
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Default Polish Egg and Lutescent

I am still eating Polish egg today (Nov. 26) from the hung vine (September 15 th cut and hung ) also still good quality Lutescent ...good quality but the end of the

Lutescent hung vine.



I think there is a possible distinction note of ones that are "extended keepers"

that are not quite as long keeper as " Long Keepers"
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Old November 28, 2017   #26
BlackBear
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Default More LongKeepers

I did at one time have seeds for Mysterykeeper

I think I have
Grappoli d'Inverno seeds for trial.


I checked Tatiana's site and found 3 other interesting ones I may order for spring.

Long keeper burpee
Selma
Zhiraf

any other new longkeeper finds out there ??
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