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Old February 1, 2017   #121
dmforcier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Trying to understand why a Christmas light manufacturer would use a series circuit...

The circuit resistance is the sum of the resistances of all those bulbs in series. Thus the current flow is 1/n of a single bulb, where n is the number of (identical) bulbs. Meaning that the bulbs glow that much less brightly. And also that they burn out that much less often.

Hardly seems sufficient justification.
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Old February 1, 2017   #122
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Originally Posted by dmforcier View Post
Trying to understand why a Christmas light manufacturer would use a series circuit...

The circuit resistance is the sum of the resistances of all those bulbs in series. Thus the current flow is 1/n of a single bulb, where n is the number of (identical) bulbs. Meaning that the bulbs glow that much less brightly. And also that they burn out that much less often.

Hardly seems sufficient justification.
Odd but true the old ones were this way as well as some the old lighting.

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Old February 1, 2017   #123
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Series circuits for holiday lights allowed the use of lower wattage bulbs (less expensive, not as hot) and they were easier and cheaper to make (fewer wires).
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Old February 1, 2017   #124
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I have an electricity question.

Background - a while back, there was a fad called the "ice bucket challenge" to raise awareness for ALS. Here's the wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_Bucket_Challenge

A firefighter died in a tragic accident related to the challenge:
http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/21/us/fir...ket-challenge/

The power company told investigators that if one gets within a distance of three to four feet from a power line, the energy that surrounds the voltage wire can arc and electrocute other objects, Hazlette told CNN. That's what authorities believe happened in this case.

My question is this: the arcing to water phenomenon that killed the firefighter, is that only something that happens with high-voltage power lines, or is it possible with residential wiring?
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Old February 1, 2017   #125
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Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
I have an electricity question.

Background - a while back, there was a fad called the "ice bucket challenge" to raise awareness for ALS. Here's the wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_Bucket_Challenge

A firefighter died in a tragic accident related to the challenge:
http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/21/us/fir...ket-challenge/

The power company told investigators that if one gets within a distance of three to four feet from a power line, the energy that surrounds the voltage wire can arc and electrocute other objects, Hazlette told CNN. That's what authorities believe happened in this case.

My question is this: the arcing to water phenomenon that killed the firefighter, is that only something that happens with high-voltage power lines, or is it possible with residential wiring?
Just high voltage lines.
The flux is over the top with these lines.
You can run wires along these lines for a distance and get electricity from them.
This was Tesla's dream free energy for everyone.
An earth surrounded by high voltage.
Remember though that household wiring comes from a transformer that brings it down.
The stuff along the street is higher and that comes from wires that are way high.
I have held my meter leads in the air around power plants and picked up 60Hz on the reading.
Snap crackle pop.
'

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Last edited by Worth1; February 1, 2017 at 09:16 PM.
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Old February 1, 2017   #126
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IIRC, the residential feed lines are 600V 3-phase, stepped down to 120/240 by the pole transformer. You don't want to mess with them.

Long distance transmission lines range from 70,000 to 750,000 volts. The arcing distance depends heavily on atmospheric conditions, such as humidity. You don't want to get anywhere near these buggers.
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Old February 2, 2017   #127
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ok. thanks.
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Old February 2, 2017   #128
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Residential feed lines are more like 7,000 to 13,000 single phase before the transformer.
Very few neighborhoods have 3 phase.
3 phase stops right up the street from me.
In town it is an other story it all depends on where you are at too.
Along the highway yes.
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Old February 2, 2017   #129
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I'm still trying to get past a fireman dumping water on himself around high power lines.

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Old February 2, 2017   #130
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Default Silver chain mail suits.

I got the chance to work on a lot of high rises,windmill farms,bridgework.Three things scare me the most.10 plus ft pythons in my backyard.Man.ELECTRICITY MAN MADE OR FROM THE HEAVENS.met a guy who hovers with $125,000 chain mail suit on to replace ceramic insulators,maintenance all the while from a smaller fast moving chopper.This was hard working union man. FYI if you see a man with a IBEW tag.It means. "INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS "or I'm broke every week,or my favorite I bee with everyone's wife.
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Old February 2, 2017   #131
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DOW means don't over work or destroy our world.
Bp means busted pipe or British Polluters.

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Old February 2, 2017   #132
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Great read...

Now 15amp wall plugs with 14/2 in the walls. Any reason not to pull 12/2 for 20amp wall plugs and change out the breakers to 20amp? All walls are wide open and it's a mobile home. No i am not replacing aluminium wiring.
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Old February 2, 2017   #133
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I would think it would depend on what you planned on plugging in. Kitchen circuits are the most commonly overloaded.

My mom just bought a microwave that I talked her into returning. The instructions asked for a dedicated 15 amp circuit just to run the 1000 watt microwave, which I think is overkill.
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Old February 2, 2017   #134
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I agree. No real point in replacing the existing 15A legs. But adding one for a high-current appliance such as a microwave would make a difference - and be easier.

Upgrading the plugs isn't a bad idea, either.
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Old February 2, 2017   #135
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSalvage View Post
Great read...

Now 15amp wall plugs with 14/2 in the walls. Any reason not to pull 12/2 for 20amp wall plugs and change out the breakers to 20amp? All walls are wide open and it's a mobile home. No i am not replacing aluminium wiring.
All walls wide open run 12 gauge wire install 20 amp breakers and 15 amp receptacles.
Not a bad idea to strategically put in a 20 amp outlet here and there either.

Now remember you can GFCI protect many outlets with one outlet wired correctly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
I would think it would depend on what you planned on plugging in. Kitchen circuits are the most commonly overloaded.

My mom just bought a microwave that I talked her into returning. The instructions asked for a dedicated 15 amp circuit just to run the 1000 watt microwave, which I think is overkill.
I can see the reasoning behind it.
The microwave alone pulls 8 amps add a 500 watt blender and you are at 12 amps.
Now someone wants to make four slices of toast at 1800 watts which is 15 amps alone.
Guess what if all of this stuff is on one 15 amp circuit you just tripped the breaker at 27 amps.
It is ridiculous to have 15 amp breakers and 14 gauge wire in a house.
We live int the 21st century we use a lot of power.
Step up and put in bigger breaker panels and bigger wire with bigger breakers.
I have a ton of breakers and they are all at least 20 amp.
I have never tripped one.

I have lived in houses with 4 breakers built back in the old days.
My little house has 22 breakers.
6 of which are 240 VAC the rest 120 vac 20 amp.
I'm wired.

Worth

Last edited by Worth1; February 2, 2017 at 05:26 PM.
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