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Old April 8, 2014   #16
clkeiper
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To have the organic fungicide products work well, you need to be spraying them before you ever see an issue popping up. They won't eliminate or cure the fungal problems. The daconil seems to keep the fungus under control once you have the blight started, but you need to spray regularly for it to be effective. We sprayed every 7-10 days last year for control. If you see a plant that starts early in your patch pull it out and dispose of it. Then wash yourself off before touching any other plants out there. Start a spray schedule if that happens or start a spray schedule before you see anything at all.
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Old April 8, 2014   #17
RayR
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Daconil is purely a preventative, it blocks the sites where fungal pathogens gain entry in the leaf. It washes off easily so needs to be reapplied after it rains. I don't use it myself, but a lot of people here use it with good results.

Actinovate is an organic solution, instead of a chemical you are applying a bacteria (streptomyces lydicus wyec 108), which populates the leaf surface and produces strong antifungal compounds that kill fungal pathogens. The bacteria as they grow and reproduce glue themselves to the leaf surface, so they are more resistant to washing off. It should however be reapplied every 7-10 days for reinforcement. It also is good as a soil drench in the root zone to protect the roots from pathogens. It also plays a role in plant nutrition by mineralizing nutrients in plant available form, for instance streptomyces lydicus produces siderophores that chelate iron for root uptake.

I don't put much credence in negative Amazon or YouTube reviews for a product like Organicide. The negative results is usually the fault of the user not reading the instructions carefully, not using the proper dilution rate for the particular crop, not spraying in the sun, not using it on certain plants that are known to be sensitive to the product, expecting it to be effective on pathogens or pests that it is not even rated for.
Cornell has tested it over the years and has found it to be very effective against powdery mildew and even Septoria. I can vouch for its effectiveness for PM on cucurbits, I've never had PM on tomato that I know of. I've not tried it yet for Septoria on tomato, but I just may try it in addition to Actinovate this year.

Efficacy of Biofungicide Products for Foliar Diseases in Organically-Produced Tomato

Integrated approach with resistant varieties and effective approved protectant yields best results in organic fungicide trials
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Old April 8, 2014   #18
Dewayne mater
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Nice post RayR! i always appreciate support for opinions.

So, 12 hours before a light rain over a couple of hours time, I applied a mix of Organicide and Actinovate in amounts as directed on the packaging. So, I'm wondering if I should go right back and reapply, or alternate with a different product, such as Daconil. (or alternatively antifungals like copper mixed with mancozeb) My question really is, did the 12 hours of application time before rain of Organicide and Actinovate "take" or did they wash right into the ground? We look to be dry for a week or more now.

So far, insects aren't killing me, so I'm focused on disease.

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Old April 8, 2014   #19
b54red
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I use Daconil on most of my summer crops and it is fairly effective which is about as good as you can get down here where it is so hot and humid. I also sometimes use a copper fungicide. Both do a decent job of prevention but once a disease gets going the best thing to use is a dilute bleach spray which will stop most diseases or at least slow them down a lot; but it is not a preventative.

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Old April 8, 2014   #20
gssgarden
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I hope and PRAY that stuff works on my stink bugs!! They beat my tomatoes down bad last year!!!


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Old April 9, 2014   #21
RayR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewayne mater View Post
Nice post RayR! i always appreciate support for opinions.

So, 12 hours before a light rain over a couple of hours time, I applied a mix of Organicide and Actinovate in amounts as directed on the packaging. So, I'm wondering if I should go right back and reapply, or alternate with a different product, such as Daconil. (or alternatively antifungals like copper mixed with mancozeb) My question really is, did the 12 hours of application time before rain of Organicide and Actinovate "take" or did they wash right into the ground? We look to be dry for a week or more now.

So far, insects aren't killing me, so I'm focused on disease.

Dewayne mater
I don't rightly know Dewayne, the Organicide being made of Sesame oil and fish oil sticks pretty well to the leaf surface. When I used it last season, it was hot and dry so I didn't see it under rain conditions. How tank mixing it with Actinovate works, I don't know either. I was thinking of alternating Actinovate and Organicide on some plants to see if the results are the same, better or worse than Actinovate alone.
Since you mentioned Daconil, I wondering if the Organicide would block Daconil from adhering to the leaf sites or even prevent a copper from adhering to the leaf well.
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Old June 20, 2018   #22
rick9748
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After the bleach what fungicide do you start back with or do you feed with foliar spray??Do you mix; mancozeb, copper or chlora....?Is so how do you adjust the rates per gallon?Full strength of both ect.??
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Old June 23, 2018   #23
b54red
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick9748 View Post
After the bleach what fungicide do you start back with or do you feed with foliar spray??Do you mix; mancozeb, copper or chlora....?Is so how do you adjust the rates per gallon?Full strength of both ect.??
After the bleach spray I almost always follow up with a copper spray two days later unless I am having Early Blight problems and in that case I like to use Daconil. I haven't been able to find any mancozeb locally but would like to mix it with copper as a preventive for bacterial leaf spot on peppers which has been more and more a problem the last few years.

For stink bugs I have found that Permethrin, food grade diatomaceous earth and Dawn dish washing liquid work great as a spray but I have a good back pack sprayer that can handle the mix. I think it would clog up a small sprayer. This is the same mix I use on spider mites which have already invaded my greenhouse so this year I am going to be proactive. We have had a week of very hot weather nearing 100 each day with very warm nights and I'm sure the spider mites are about to hit me big time. I am going to go ahead and spray in the next day or so and see if I can prevent them from getting a good foothold on my tomatoes. I usually wait until I see them damaging several plants before starting to spray but this year I think I will start early since the weather has been perfect for them to start showing up. They are probably already on some of my plants but not bad enough to be detected yet and I am still having flea beetle problems so spraying early may kill two birds with one stone. I will probably also add a copper fungicide into the mix because I'm pretty sure gray mold will soon make an appearance on my black tomatoes and it also helps keep mildews off my squash and cucumbers.

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