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Old May 28, 2018   #16
b54red
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Found my 1st TSWV infected tomato plant Sunday morning. It was a young seedling that didn’t even have blooms on it yet. I only planted it last week. I hope but doubt it will be the last. I usually lose between 3 and 20 plants to TSWV each year.

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Old May 29, 2018   #17
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Sorry to hear that Bill. I pulled both plants (Zena's Gift and one other PL plant) today. Should I replant in the same holes, or can I be sure that it's only transmitted through insects (thrips)?
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Old May 29, 2018   #18
b54red
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Sorry to hear that Bill. I pulled both plants (Zena's Gift and one other PL plant) today. Should I replant in the same holes, or can I be sure that it's only transmitted through insects (thrips)?
There is no problem with planting in the same hole. If I had a replacement plant the hole would already be filled; but as it is it will just mean a bit more space between two of the plants. I have already picked over 50 tomatoes so far and with the rain every day for the last 10 days there has been little sun so when this weather finally moves out I am expecting a rush of ripening fruit when the weather here returns to the normal steamy, hot and sunny conditions. I may also experience a real upsurge in disease and insect activity because spraying for foliage diseases has been rather useless lately.
Hope you don't see any more TSWV this season.

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Old May 30, 2018   #19
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Thank you Bill- I always learn a great deal from you. And we aren't that far apart climate-wise. Now I have to go to Piedmont Feed and Seed and pick out two babies to plant there- wonder what I should get? It's so addictive, tomato gardening...
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Old May 31, 2018   #20
b54red
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Thank you Bill- I always learn a great deal from you. And we aren't that far apart climate-wise. Now I have to go to Piedmont Feed and Seed and pick out two babies to plant there- wonder what I should get? It's so addictive, tomato gardening...
This late in the season I used to have really good luck with Big Beef. It always did good for me during the heat of the summer and fall. My favorites for this late planting are some of the black varieties like Spudakee, JDs Special C Tex and ISPL. I also have found a few others that do well in the heat of the summer like Pruden's Purple, Arkansas Traveler, and 1884.

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Old May 31, 2018   #21
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This late in the season I used to have really good luck with Big Beef. It always did good for me during the heat of the summer and fall. My favorites for this late planting are some of the black varieties like Spudakee, JDs Special C Tex and ISPL. I also have found a few others that do well in the heat of the summer like Pruden's Purple, Arkansas Traveler, and 1884.

Bill
Thanks for the suggestions! The pickin's were slim at the feed store, but I picked up an Anna Russian heart plant, as well as a Kellogg's Breakfast. Can't go wrong with those!
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Old June 1, 2018   #22
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Wow, score! I have never seen varieties like that locally. Very lucky to find Pruden's Purple and Box Car Willie this year. Usually it is only the most common heirlooms, like Brandywine and Cherokee Purple.
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Old June 9, 2018   #23
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Default What do y'all think?

Theses are Early Girls. I started noticing this discoloration a few days ago, mainly on older, lower leaves. The tops are still looking healthy and putting on new growth...they are almost 6 ft tall. I have noticed more aphids this year and those tiny little white fly-looking things...

I get this same thing most years when the hard heat sets in. I just prune off the affected leaves and go on. It doesn't seem to have affected the fruit at all.20180608_194025.jpg

20180608_194036.jpg
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Old June 9, 2018   #24
b54red
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Looks like Early Blight.

Bill
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Old June 9, 2018   #25
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Yes, early blight is my guess as well. Spray with daconil as soon as you can.
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Old June 9, 2018   #26
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Early blight for sure. Daconil is a preventive but won't do much for an active infection. Use copper spray at 1/2 of the weakest recommended strength, and avoid spraying the blossoms. Spray after you have trimmed off infected leaves.
Therefore fly lookjng things are probably whiteflies, and they are trouble. That's how tomato plants get TYLCV,and its incureable plus the whitefly feeds on yhe infected plant then gives the virus to the next one, so if you get it you have to pull the plant immediately. I use yellow sticky traps put out every 5 feet and I don't have issues with whiteflies anymore. They are strongly attracted to the yellow color.
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Old June 10, 2018   #27
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If you have had this same issue for years and your tomatoes did fine with just trimming the affected leaves, makes sense to me to keep doing just that


The White Flies if you have them need to be taken care of

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Old June 10, 2018   #28
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If you have had this same issue for years and your tomatoes did fine with just trimming the affected leaves, makes sense to me to keep doing just that


The White Flies if you have them need to be taken care of
I agree with this.
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Old June 10, 2018   #29
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What happens when you spray the Blossoms with Draconil?
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Old June 10, 2018   #30
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What happens when you spray the Blossoms with Draconil?
I don't know, I don't use it. Copper stunts blossom growth, they fall off, but very light mist of copper accudentally falling wont hurt, just a direct spray will. This was something I learned the hard way.
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