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Old June 10, 2018   #31
carolyn137
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Originally Posted by tryno12 View Post
What happens when you spray the Blossoms with Draconil?
Nothing in my opinion.

I love your spelling of it, but here's another alternative spelling...Dracula.

Daconil is THE most widely used anti fungal in the world for both commercial and home applications, several companies make it,like Ortho and Bonide, and there's no way you can avoid spraying blossoms on a plant when you are trying to get good coverage.

I can no longer do my own gardening, but have someone who does it for me and just yesterday I asked her to start spraying with Daconil to help prevent foliage fungal diseases which are the most common where I now live and garden.

If rain washes it off just reapply, and also know that early AM fog is also a problem, which where I am usually occurs when the humidity is high.

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Old June 10, 2018   #32
tryno12
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I use Copper also by alternating, but was wondering why I have no fruit set yet - I imagine I am a bit impatient - have a lot of blossoms, a lot have fallen off, a lot more coming so................??
Plants set out 5/17 - 5/20 specifically that I notice right off are Elgin Pink, Olive Hill, Cherokee Purple, and Brutus.
Plants look great.................I vote for inpatience
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Old June 10, 2018   #33
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Goodloe, I get some early blight at some point in the season every year. Like you, I just prune off the affected leaves. And never found the fruit to be affected by it. If it gets into the stems it can be bad though, and take down a plant before its day. I dip my pruners in bleach for all the big cuts I have to make, and since I started doing that, they don't get infected with anything.

Well I had my education for the day, - all I need to know about Daconil.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorothalonil

There's always some side effect of the chemical products that makes me happier to carry on without the stuff. Harmful to honeybees.... probable carcinogen (to kidney) in long term exposures... main breakdown product is 30 X more toxic and persists for longer in the environment...

Seriously, all things considered I'm starting to think of Early Blight as a lovely thing by comparison. EB.. no prob! Bring it on... I'll take it.
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Old June 10, 2018   #34
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Goodloe, I get some early blight at some point in the season every year. Like you, I just prune off the affected leaves. And never found the fruit to be affected by it. If it gets into the stems it can be bad though, and take down a plant before its day. I dip my pruners in bleach for all the big cuts I have to make, and since I started doing that, they don't get infected with anything.

Well I had my education for the day, - all I need to know about Daconil.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorothalonil

There's always some side effect of the chemical products that makes me happier to carry on without the stuff. Harmful to honeybees.... probable carcinogen (to kidney) in long term exposures... main breakdown product is 30 X more toxic and persists for longer in the environment...

Seriously, all things considered I'm starting to think of Early Blight as a lovely thing by comparison. EB.. no prob! Bring it on... I'll take it.
Yes, I read that link you gave a long time ago,but I also suggest reading EXTOXNET as well, actually it's my first place to go when looking for more info about almost anything used for crops of almost anything.

I hope you might find it as useful as I have.

https://www.google.com/search?q=EXTO...&bih=815&dpr=1

I like EXTOXNET very much since it is many sources reporting,not just one.

Carolyn
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Old June 10, 2018   #35
Johnniemar
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Nothing happens when i spray my blossoms with daconil. I have had better luck controling early blight and septoria with daconil. However, i also use copper a few times a season.
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Old June 10, 2018   #36
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New Zealand has banned Chlorothalonil in home gardens citing safety and health concerns.



It is the first time the EPA has issued a Red Alert notice. CEO Allan Freeth says: “We have issued this Red Alert to raise public awareness of the dangers of using products containing chlorothalonil, a broad-spectrum pesticide used to control fungal leaf diseases in vegetables, ornamental crops and turf.


“Chlorothalonil is acutely toxic, especially if inhaled, and is classified as a suspected carcinogen. The European Union has banned its use in consumer products. The US and Canadian authorities are also concerned about the dangers it represents to domestic users.”


Dr Freeth initiated a reassessment of chlorothalonil based on his concerns over new evidence which came to light when the EPA considered a recent application for a fungicide containing the substance. It found there were unacceptable human health risks that could not be mitigated by imposing controls on its use in a domestic setting.


“Given the serious effects chlorothalonil can have on human health and the environment, initiating a Red Alert is another way for us to help protect New Zealand and New Zealanders from chemicals that we have concerns about,” says Dr Freeth.



http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE170...eners-safe.htm
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Old June 10, 2018   #37
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Originally Posted by seaeagle View Post
New Zealand has banned Chlorothalonil in home gardens citing safety and health concerns.



It is the first time the EPA has issued a Red Alert notice. CEO Allan Freeth says: “We have issued this Red Alert to raise public awareness of the dangers of using products containing chlorothalonil, a broad-spectrum pesticide used to control fungal leaf diseases in vegetables, ornamental crops and turf.


“Chlorothalonil is acutely toxic, especially if inhaled, and is classified as a suspected carcinogen. The European Union has banned its use in consumer products. The US and Canadian authorities are also concerned about the dangers it represents to domestic users.”


Dr Freeth initiated a reassessment of chlorothalonil based on his concerns over new evidence which came to light when the EPA considered a recent application for a fungicide containing the substance. It found there were unacceptable human health risks that could not be mitigated by imposing controls on its use in a domestic setting.


“Given the serious effects chlorothalonil can have on human health and the environment, initiating a Red Alert is another way for us to help protect New Zealand and New Zealanders from chemicals that we have concerns about,” says Dr Freeth.



http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE170...eners-safe.htm
Wow! Good to know. Glad I don't use it.
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Old June 10, 2018   #38
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Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
Yes, I read that link you gave a long time ago,but I also suggest reading EXTOXNET as well, actually it's my first place to go when looking for more info about almost anything used for crops of almost anything.

I hope you might find it as useful as I have.

https://www.google.com/search?q=EXTO...&bih=815&dpr=1

I like EXTOXNET very much since it is many sources reporting,not just one.

Carolyn
Thanks Carolyn. EXTOXNET has a different set of information on this one. The two links for Chlorothalonil are about residue tolerances in the food chain, including everything from nuts, fruits, vegs, and meats! I guess as the wiki said, there are tons of it around in the environment and especially on our food. And on animal feed I guess.
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Old June 10, 2018   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seaeagle View Post
New Zealand has banned Chlorothalonil in home gardens citing safety and health concerns.



It is the first time the EPA has issued a Red Alert notice. CEO Allan Freeth says: “We have issued this Red Alert to raise public awareness of the dangers of using products containing chlorothalonil, a broad-spectrum pesticide used to control fungal leaf diseases in vegetables, ornamental crops and turf.


“Chlorothalonil is acutely toxic, especially if inhaled, and is classified as a suspected carcinogen. The European Union has banned its use in consumer products. The US and Canadian authorities are also concerned about the dangers it represents to domestic users.”


Dr Freeth initiated a reassessment of chlorothalonil based on his concerns over new evidence which came to light when the EPA considered a recent application for a fungicide containing the substance. It found there were unacceptable human health risks that could not be mitigated by imposing controls on its use in a domestic setting.


“Given the serious effects chlorothalonil can have on human health and the environment, initiating a Red Alert is another way for us to help protect New Zealand and New Zealanders from chemicals that we have concerns about,” says Dr Freeth.




http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE170...eners-safe.htm
And do you know why it was banned especially for potatoes and tomatoes?

It was banned b'c of the Potato Spindle Viroid which infects both potatoes AND tomatoes and has now been seen in several places here in the US although I didn't take the time to Google that last comment to confirm that but anyone can do that as well.

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&....0.3zXMCgpIUAk

More importantly Craig L and Patricia Nueske Small were sending seeds back and forth for the Dwarf Project so they could have 2 generations each year, and the Disease moved to Australia as well.And that got stopped

https://www.google.com/search?q=Pota...&bih=815&dpr=1

I didn't check out the comment about Canada, but I know that Daconil along with many other products used on crops that are sold in the US cannot be sold in Canada. And I also know how some of the Canadians get around that as well since, well,let's just call the border between the US and Canada porous, and I'm not talking about humans going through that porous wall.

Let's just say that I'm in Canada and can't get Daconil but I have a very close friend in the US who will cooperate with me.

Speaking for myself,I wouldn't be so quick to condemn Daconil everywhere, but only for those countries/areas where the huge concern is that Potato Spindle Viroid. And I'm also sure that for many of you you've never heard of that disease until I posted about it.

Life is a learning process,so it is said .So I'm assuming that the longer I'm alive the more I learn.

Carolyn
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Old June 10, 2018   #40
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Originally Posted by bower View Post
Thanks Carolyn. EXTOXNET has a different set of information on this one. The two links for Chlorothalonil are about residue tolerances in the food chain, including everything from nuts, fruits, vegs, and meats! I guess as the wiki said, there are tons of it around in the environment and especially on our food. And on animal feed I guess.
I'll have to check out that site again since i haven't been there in several years. They many be listing different concentrations of Bravo for commercial purposes,I think the Cornell link might have more and thanks for pointing that out to me.

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Old June 10, 2018   #41
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Ok, but please explain, how does Daconil cause Potato Spindle Viroid?
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Old June 10, 2018   #42
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Ok, but please explain, how does Daconil cause Potato Spindle Viroid?
Daconil does not CAUSE the Potato Spindle Viroid to exist Marsha,the viroid exists in and of itself.

Someone may take antibiotics for a bacterial disease but the bacterial disease doesn't exist because of the antibiotics but the reverse may be true.

And what I mean by that is that if one takes lots of antibiotics and the disease is NOT bacterial, then what can happen, and does is that selective pressure allows for mutation and transference of plasmids that have the resistance genes from one bacterium to another and that's really bad.

Here's info I have in my wallet that is encased in aplastic sleeve, and I'll just summarize

most common infections following joint replacement surgery are bacteria that enter the bloodstream after dental procedures, GI procedures UTI's or skin infections

These bacteria can lodge around the joint and cause infection

Following your surgery you must take antibiotics prior to dental work or GI procedures that could allow bacteria to enter your bloodstream.

On the back I was given a choice of antibiotics,it was suggested I choose amoxacillin, one hour before the procedure and I did before I let my excellent dentist, Dr Valerio, do what he had planned to do that day.

It's a different story now since I'm permanently homebound and no way could I get to see Dr. Valerio again, but we've worked it out so that I can get my local MD to approve the amoxacillin here at home and I have to take a probiotic at the same time.


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Old June 11, 2018   #43
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Carolyn, you posted that Daconil was banned in some countries because of the Potato Spindle Viroid ...


Quote:
It was banned b'c of the Potato Spindle Viroid which infects both potatoes AND tomatoes and has now been seen in several places here in the US although I didn't take the time to Google that last comment to confirm that but anyone can do that as well.
Quote:
Speaking for myself,I wouldn't be so quick to condemn Daconil everywhere, but only for those countries/areas where the huge concern is that Potato Spindle Viroid. And I'm also sure that for many of you you've never heard of that disease until I posted about it.
What Marsha was asking, and what we need explained is the mechanism by which Daconil makes it more likely for PSV to infect the potato plants. What action(s) of Daconil make it likely to cause the viroid to successfully thrive on potatoes? Why would a chemical coating to prevent attachments of fungal spores make it more attractive to viruses?
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Old June 11, 2018   #44
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Well, whether there is or isn't a separate concern relative to the Potato Spindle Viroid, the article that seaeagle posted is perfectly clear, that the reasons for the ban in NZ is the concern for human health and the environment.
"“Given the serious effects chlorothalonil can have on human health and the environment, initiating a Red Alert is another way for us to help protect New Zealand and New Zealanders from chemicals that we have concerns about,” says Dr Freeth."

Also I don't know of a ban in Canada, the wiki said that there are high levels of it found in PEI - where potatoes are the main crop - and that some fish kills in PEI had been caused by runoff of the stuff. So the spuds I buy here are likely contaminated with the same residues.

@Carolyn, just browsing I came on this link to "Toxnet" at the NLM. This one really does cite a lot of sources, and covers about everything!
https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/s...rm+@DOCNO+1546

Last edited by bower; June 11, 2018 at 12:28 PM. Reason: add.. and add again
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Old June 11, 2018   #45
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Carolyn, you posted that Daconil was banned in some countries because of the Potato Spindle Viroid ...


What Marsha was asking, and what we need explained is the mechanism by which Daconil makes it more likely for PSV to infect the potato plants. What action(s) of Daconil make it likely to cause the viroid to successfully thrive on potatoes? Why would a chemical coating to prevent attachments of fungal spores make it more attractive to viruses?
Yes, Dee, exactly this. Thank you.
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