Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Forum area for discussing hybridizing tomatoes in technical terms and information pertinent to trait/variety specific long-term (1+ years) growout projects.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 5, 2013   #16
carolyn137
Moderator Emeritus
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 21,190
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwin View Post
It came up in something I was reading a while back on leaf morphology - a bit dense, but worth digging through if you are interested.
http://www.plantcell.org/content/23/10/3595.full
The research is fairly recent (2011)

Lee
Thanks Lee and I do get the main points but there were many genes I didn't know by name, and nowI do.

I'm surpirsed that Arabdopsis is still being used as a model system but since it's so easy to grow and study I shouldn't be surprised.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 5, 2013   #17
ChrisK
Tomatovillian™
 
ChrisK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,448
Default

Nice paper. Thanks for posting it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwin View Post
It came up in something I was reading a while back on leaf morphology - a bit dense, but worth digging through if you are interested.
http://www.plantcell.org/content/23/10/3595.full
The research is fairly recent (2011)

Lee
__________________
Blog: chriskafer.wordpress.com

Ignorance more frequently begets knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. --Charles Darwin
ChrisK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 7, 2013   #18
FishMato
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9
Default

The black krim seeds have already sprouted. They were planted around three days ago, along with the Cherokee purple and some cherry tomatoes. The other charities were planted late and have not come up yet. I'm clearing the are for my breeding garden tomorrow . I will be adding mushroom compost, some topsoil, black kow and some perlite.
FishMato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 11, 2013   #19
FishMato
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9
Default

All the seeds hav came up. I am starting to clear the its where they will be grown. Since this is my first time growing heirloom tomatoes, I am doing a sort of side by side test plot to test factors such as yield, disease resitance, drought tolerance and so on as well as some breeding.
FishMato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25, 2013   #20
crmauch
Tomatovillian™
 
crmauch's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Honey Brook, PA Zone 6b
Posts: 398
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FishMato View Post
All the seeds hav came up. I am starting to clear the its where they will be grown. Since this is my first time growing heirloom tomatoes, I am doing a sort of side by side test plot to test factors such as yield, disease resitance, drought tolerance and so on as well as some breeding.
How has your breeding gone?
crmauch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25, 2013   #21
frogsleap farm
Tomatovillian™
 
frogsleap farm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 560
Default

I apologize if this comment is far from the original topic of this thread. I am homozygous for the geek gene. A mutation that leads to a deletion (single base pair or larger) almost always leads to a loss of function mutant - a mutant plant for which the mutant gene is non-funtional. As DarJones points out there were several independent loss of function mutants in the gene for chlorophyll degeneration in the fruit, all leading to the retained chlorophyll (or black) phenotype. They are allelic - acting as the same allele for the gf gene. Based on the paper Lee references, PL is controlled by a transcription factor (regulatory gene) that controls expression of one or more functional genes (as is the gene controlling yellow vs clear epidermis - red vs pink). Transcription factors can control multiple genes in multiple pathways, thus the "pleiotropic" effects Dar references. Aft, controlling anthocyanin production in tomato fruit, is another interesting transcription factor - now understood to also influence delayed ripening. I also agree with Dar that a reversion mutation PL to RL is very unlikely.
frogsleap farm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25, 2013   #22
goodwin
Tomatovillian™
 
goodwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Espanola, New Mexico
Posts: 593
Default

frogsleap,
Good to hear from you, and an apt comment. What you say about Aft would explain some things.
I have your Indigo Tiger in the second year of full production and have separated two strains, but will post the results of that in the other thread.
It looks like you are doing some interesting work as usual.
Lee
goodwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26, 2013   #23
ChrisK
Tomatovillian™
 
ChrisK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,448
Default

Since I am also homozygous for geekness...loss of 1 or 2 bp leads to loss of function because reading frame changes. Loss of 3 consecutive bases (or multiple thereof) would not necessarily do so as reading frame is maintained, and proteins often retain function with this type of mutation. Same goes for insertion of bases.


Quote:
Originally Posted by frogsleap farm View Post
I apologize if this comment is far from the original topic of this thread. I am homozygous for the geek gene. A mutation that leads to a deletion (single base pair or larger) almost always leads to a loss of function mutant -
__________________
Blog: chriskafer.wordpress.com

Ignorance more frequently begets knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. --Charles Darwin
ChrisK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26, 2013   #24
frogsleap farm
Tomatovillian™
 
frogsleap farm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 560
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisK View Post
Since I am also homozygous for geekness...loss of 1 or 2 bp leads to loss of function because reading frame changes. Loss of 3 consecutive bases (or multiple thereof) would not necessarily do so as reading frame is maintained, and proteins often retain function with this type of mutation. Same goes for insertion of bases.
Chris - thus my almost always qualifier. A frameshift mutation is a no brainer loss of function, deletion of one or more amino acids (one or more sets of 3bp deletions) may or may not, depending on whether the amino acid deletion(s) is/are in a critical region of the protein.
frogsleap farm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26, 2013   #25
ChrisK
Tomatovillian™
 
ChrisK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,448
Default

Correct. Just wanted to be clear (or maybe just overly pedantic)




Quote:
Originally Posted by frogsleap farm View Post
Chris - thus my almost always qualifier. A frameshift mutation is a no brainer loss of function, deletion of one or more amino acids (one or more sets of 3bp deletions) may or may not, depending on whether the amino acid deletion(s) is/are in a critical region of the protein.
__________________
Blog: chriskafer.wordpress.com

Ignorance more frequently begets knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. --Charles Darwin
ChrisK is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:31 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★