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Old January 4, 2014   #1
MrsJustice
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Default Angel Field Heirloom Tomatoes Seeds

I want to Thank everyone for helping me to become a Professional Farmer. I have the last house from the Contraband Slaves here in Hampton. Learning how to farm like the Natives Americans has been very hard work. Especially learning each fruit and vegetables the Native Americans taught the free Contraband Slaves to grow very close the water front took many years of Research, and you help. It hard trying to do all of this hard works while suffering from Dyslexia. My Ninth Grade Teacher taught me that President Abraham Lincoln suffered from dyslexia too and always stay focused. Saving this Historical House and the Muscadine Grape Vine along with the Food History of these forgotten Professional Farmers has just taken the best of my life and hopefully I have the same energy and time to learn the food history of Irish Americans. I want to thank everyone for being very patience with me over the last 10 years.


You can contact me anytime with any information about Irish Fruits & Vegetables History. .http://angelfieldheirloomtomatoes.com

My real Name is Joyce Beggs.
Form the Homeless people to Forgotten History.


Our Mission
Angel Field Heirloom Tomatoes Historical Property mission is to preserve the farming and food history of the Contraband Slaves who received freedom protection here during the Civil War from the Hon. Union General “Benjamin Franklin Butler” in May 23, 1861. Butler's decisions gave Contraband Slaves of all ages the first protection of Freedom, as they pour in to Fortress Monroe after the burning of the City of Hampton. The Contraband Slaves calling their new found home ““Chesapeake City” They brought with them Historical Seeds, Historical Plants, and especially a “Historical Muscadine Grapes Vine” which still growing strongly on our historical property. Native Americans taught the Contrabands Slaves to use the muscadine grapes as medicine. Along with Winter Squashes like the historical “Cushaw Squash” and other farming secrets Native’s Americans taught the Contraband Slaves to survive in the new found home called “Chesapeake City” by using the Native American Farming Secrets were able to survive and feed their families. Native American only shared their food secrets of their Native Plants with cultures they trusted. We hope to make available 2 year old cutting from our Historical "Muscadine Grape Vines" to plant on your property by selling plants from the Mother Vine from 1861. In 1910 the Muscadine’s Vines were being genetically altered, so it's our goal to make available pure cutting in 2015. So sign-up for our News Letters.
• Goals for 2014
• Native Americans also shared their farming & food secrets with Irish Americans. Angel Field Heirloom Tomatoes Goals for 2014 is collecting the food history from Ireland emigrants starting in 1847 as the Irish blood in my family arrived here in America around 1847-1861, with very little known about the seeds and plants they brought with them. Is’ our Mission to bring your New Varieties from Ireland in 2014. So please sing-up for our Newsletters as we add Heirloom Tomatoes Varieties from Ireland we grew here last summer and make seeds available for your home Garden. We will collect and sharing not only the seeds, but most importantly the fruits & vegetable plant characteristics and historical information about the seeds and plants varieties. The Irish Blood in my family come to American around 1861: same time the Contraband Slaves found their freedom here in Hampton Virginia during the Civil War. We have recovered some Dutch Heirloom Varieties this year as well and their heirloom seeds are being adding here to our E-Bay collection. .
• We welcome gardeners from all over the world to make contributions to the mission by buying our Heirloom & Open-pollinated Seeds to support our Missions and preserve our historical farming land & the History of the Contraband Slaves of Fort Monroe.
• Thank You

Framer Joyce Beggs
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Old January 5, 2014   #2
ScottinAtlanta
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Best of luck to you, Ms. Beggs!
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Old January 5, 2014   #3
MrsJustice
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Best of luck to you, Ms. Beggs!

Thank you so very much. From the start, collecting most of the Historical Vegetables were very exciting and "scary"at the same time. Like the first description of a Large Green Quash with a 18 month shelve life "that looked like a duck, turned out to be a Cushaw Squash. The Contrabands Slaves used build-in cabinets to store they winter vegetables. This is a pictures of the build-in china cabinet made by one of the Contraband Slaves with dry storage to block all sun light too perfectly store their Winter Squash,Potatoes, Onions. My husband and I have tried to save this historical Cabinet for years. All trim work were done by the professional hands of the Contraband Slaves. Tomatoes and other Fruits & Vetagtables were " only can in jars for winter food uses and stored deep inside of hide stroge deep in the upper left of this historical hand made Cabinet in this picture.
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Old January 5, 2014   #4
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Thank you for a most interesting presentation and historical overview. As a former teacher I can sympathize with the frustrations you have encountered suffering from dyslexia. I know how hard my bright dyslexic students worked to compensate and overcome that challenge. You are doing marvelous work. Continued success in you endeavors. I hope you do well with your seed sales. You are offering some wonderful tomato varieties.
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Old January 6, 2014   #5
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Thank you for a most interesting presentation and historical overview. As a former teacher I can sympathize with the frustrations you have encountered suffering from dyslexia. I know how hard my bright dyslexic students worked to compensate and overcome that challenge. You are doing marvelous work. Continued success in you endeavors. I hope you do well with your seed sales. You are offering some wonderful tomato varieties.

Thank you so much:

The love and needed guidance you gave you students will last them a life time. My 9th Grade Teacher prepared me for life. It's up to society to welcome the special gifts: dyslexia people have to offer. We see, hear and think very differently. But at the same time we have to learn to communicate and write for other to understand who we are saying.

Being surrounded by the Lost History of intelligent group of people like the Contraband Slaves, just give me great Joy. They used their gift of building during slavery and build this house with 4 x 4 and 6 x 6 to last forever, before their were building code. They used the grape from the Muscadine grape and used it as medicine as the Native American taught them. This Muscadine Grape Vine on this property came from Willard N. C. by one of the Contraband Slaves. That took 10 years of research 8 years of research. Than trying to understand the land to grow historical plants took 10 years.

But I am thankful for the gift of understanding of all forums members so worked hard to understand me for over 8 years and their patience. It still takes me a long time to type anything. But I am so thankful!!!!

Maybe my next Mission should be on the research of "Union General Benjamin Franklin Butler favorite Foods.
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Old January 7, 2014   #6
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Originally Posted by Gardadore View Post
Thank you for a most interesting presentation and historical overview. As a former teacher I can sympathize with the frustrations you have encountered suffering from dyslexia. I know how hard my bright dyslexic students worked to compensate and overcome that challenge. You are doing marvelous work. Continued success in you endeavors. I hope you do well with your seed sales. You are offering some wonderful tomato varieties.
After thinking about The "Hon. Major General Benjamin Butler" food Supply History at Fort Monroe. I realized in my Fruits and Vegetables research Over the years of the Contraband slaves: I did learn "What groups of people" responsible of feeding both sides of the Civil War and these groups of people were also left out of U. S. Food History too.

Maybe someone can help me write a book someday.
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Last edited by MrsJustice; January 7, 2014 at 04:39 PM. Reason: Dyslexia
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Old January 7, 2014   #7
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Enjoyed your post and I wish you well in your endeavor.

jon
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Old January 7, 2014   #8
MrsJustice
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Enjoyed your post and I wish you well in your endeavor.

jon

Thanks Peppero

The last historical summer Squash grown by the Conbrabands Slaves with the help of Native Americans are White Scallop Squash. I can not keep the seeds nor fresh scallop in stock in my summer Market. Last year were the first time displaying fresh white Hisotrical Scallop Squash. I sold out and had customers trying very hard to get the share of the Fresh Squash " they have not seem since they were children'. The description to me were a squash that looked like round star fish. It took years to find the natural seeds. I only have enough seeds for next summer Plants.

If anyone have any information of this "good tasting white scallop summer squashes please share it with me.

Farmer, Joyce Beggs
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Old November 14, 2014   #9
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I want to Thank everyone for helping me to become a Professional Farmer. I have the last house from the Contraband Slaves here in Hampton. Learning how to farm like the Natives Americans has been very hard work. Especially learning each fruit and vegetables the Native Americans taught the free Contraband Slaves to grow very close the water front took many years of Research, and you help. It hard trying to do all of this hard works while suffering from Dyslexia. My Ninth Grade Teacher taught me that President Abraham Lincoln suffered from dyslexia too and always stay focused. Saving this Historical House and the Muscadine Grape Vine along with the Food History of these forgotten Professional Farmers has just taken the best of my life and hopefully I have the same energy and time to learn the food history of Irish Americans. I want to thank everyone for being very patience with me over the last 10 years.


You can contact me anytime with any information about Irish Fruits & Vegetables History at jjbaby38s@aol.com .http://angelfieldheirloomtomatoes.com

My real Name is Joyce Beggs.



Our Mission
Angel Field Heirloom Tomatoes Historical Property mission is to preserve the farming and food history of the Contraband Slaves who received freedom protection here during the Civil War from the Hon. Union General “Benjamin Franklin Butler” in May 23, 1861. Butler's decisions gave Contraband Slaves of all ages the first protection of Freedom, as they pour in to Fortress Monroe after the burning of the City of Hampton. The Contraband Slaves calling their new found home ““Chesapeake City” They brought with them Historical Seeds, Historical Plants, and especially a “Historical Muscadine Grapes Vine” which still growing strongly on our historical property. Native Americans taught the Contrabands Slaves to use the muscadine grapes as medicine. Along with Winter Squashes like the historical “Cushaw Squash” and other farming secrets Native’s Americans taught the Contraband Slaves to survive in the new found home called “Chesapeake City” by using the Native American Farming Secrets were able to survive and feed their families. Native American only shared their food secrets of their Native Plants with cultures they trusted. We hope to make available 2 year old cutting from our Historical "Muscadine Grape Vines" to plant on your property by selling plants from the Mother Vine from 1861. In 1910 the Muscadine’s Vines were being genetically altered, so it's our goal to make available pure cutting of our Muscadine Grape brought to this property 1879 in 2015. So sign-up for our News Letters.
• Goals for 2014
• Native Americans also shared their farming & food secrets with Irish Americans. Angel Field Heirloom Tomatoes Goals for 2014 is collecting the food history from Ireland emigrants starting in 1847 as the Irish blood in my family arrived here in America around 1847-1861, with very little known about the seeds and plants they brought with them. Is’ our Mission to bring your New Varieties from Ireland in 2014. So please sing-up for our Newsletters as we add Heirloom Tomatoes Varieties from Ireland we grew here last summer and make seeds available for your home Garden. We will collect and sharing not only the seeds, but most importantly the fruits & vegetable plant characteristics and historical information about the seeds and plants varieties. The Irish Blood in my family come to American around 1861: same time the Contraband Slaves found their freedom here in Hampton Virginia during the Civil War. We have recovered some Dutch Heirloom Varieties this year as well and their heirloom seeds are being adding here to our E-Bay collection.
• We welcome gardeners from all over the world to make contributions to the mission by buying our Heirloom & Open-pollinated Seeds to support our Missions and preserve our historical farming land & the History of the Contraband Slaves of Fort Monroe.
• Thank You

Framer Joyce Beggs
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Old November 14, 2014   #10
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After thinking about The "Hon. Major General Benjamin Butler" food Supply History at Fort Monroe. I realized in my Fruits and Vegetables research Over the years of studing the Contraband slaves: I did learn "What groups of people" responsible of feeding both sides of the Civil War and these groups of people were also left out of U. S. Food History too. That group of People were the Native Americans all across the United States.

Maybe someone can help me write a book someday.
This year I was able to visit Native Americans in Long Beach California. I learn so much, with the help of Students of the California State University. I hugged every tree that represented special tribal ground. I pray that all these Native Americans historical sites have future historical markers that tells visitor like me some history displayed to read and understand other than being marked by rocks only. Thank God I found Students to help me.
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Last edited by MrsJustice; November 14, 2014 at 11:30 AM.
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Old November 21, 2014   #11
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Default Aunt Molly's Tomatoes Grown by Contraband Slaves

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Originally Posted by MrsJustice View Post
This year I was able to visit Native Americans in Long Beach California. I learn so much, with the help of Students of the California State University. I hugged every tree that represented special tribal ground. I pray that all these Native Americans historical sites have future historical markers that tells visitor like me some history displayed to read and understand other than being marked by rocks only. Thank God I found Students to help me.


We have just identified the wild tomatoes growing on our Historical Property called an Aunt Molly Ground Cherry Tomatoes.
I thought it was a weed, so I let it grow in its own areas for the last 18 years until we could identify it. Looking for these historical wild tomatoes has been an adventure which caused our heirloom tomatoes inventory supplies to increase before our other Heirlooms Vegetable Seed Varieties. Native American taught the American Slaves how to plant wild foods that grew back each year in wooded and open plains area’s for a survival food supply. We are very thankful To God that we have identified the last Historical Plant growing on this historical property.

I have not been abe to find 1879 history on the "Aunt Molly's Tomatoes.

Can someone let me more about this Variety of Tomatoes befroe 1879? They are very tiny and very sweet.
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Last edited by MrsJustice; November 21, 2014 at 03:27 PM.
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Old November 24, 2014   #12
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Default Gorund Cherry

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We have just identified the wild tomatoes growing on our Historical Property called an Aunt Molly Ground Cherry Tomatoes.
I thought it was a weed, so I let it grow in its own areas for the last 18 years until we could identify it. Looking for these historical wild tomatoes has been an adventure which caused our heirloom tomatoes inventory supplies to increase before our other Heirlooms Vegetable Seed Varieties. Native American taught the American Slaves how to plant wild foods that grew back each year in wooded and open plains area’s for a survival food supply. We are very thankful To God that we have identified the last Historical Plant growing on this historical property.

I have not been abe to find 1879 history on the "Aunt Molly's Tomatoes.

Can someone let me more about this Variety of Tomatoes befroe 1879? They are very tiny and very sweet.
Her are pictures of the these ground cherry plants: just in case you have not seem them grow before. http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...809#post437809

Wikipedia Encyclopedia desrcption of Ground Cherry puts the origination in Mexico. Maybe the Contrabans Slaves used this disprition of "Wild tomatoes" becasue they did not know how to read and understand English very well as they called them "Wild Tomatoes as a code name as a survival food source".

Is it possible that the European of the "ground cherry", was classified John Fraser.
This the information in the Wikipedia below.
Physalis (/ˈfaɪsəlɪs/, sometimes /faɪˈseɪlɪs/)[2] is a genus of flowering plants in the nightshade family (Solanaceae), which grow in warmtemperate and subtropical regions of the world. Most of the species, of which there may be 75-90, are indigenous to the New World with one notable exception (P. alkekengi). Cultivated species and weedy annuals have been introduced worldwide. A notable feature is the formation of a large papery husk derived from the calyx, which partly or fully encloses the fruit,.[3] The fruit is small and orange, similar in size, shape and structure to a small tomato.

At least 46 species are endemic to the country of Mexico.

Many Physalis species are called groundcherries. One name for Physalis peruviana is Cape gooseberry, not to be confused with the truegooseberries, which are of the genus Ribes in the family Grossulariaceae. Another name used to refer to the fruit is simply golden berries.

I love the Name Aunt Molly's because it reminds me of my Aunt who let me farm with her when i was a little girl. We here at Angel Field welcome the Name and the Identification of our "mysterious weed" Called Aunt Molly Ground Cherry Tomatoes.
Farmer Joyce Beggs
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Last edited by MrsJustice; November 24, 2014 at 11:47 AM. Reason: Dyslexia
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Old December 10, 2014   #13
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Default Aunt Molly's

For so many years on this form and other forums: we always talked about ground cherry. I even remember one time "I think in 2003 someone telling not to eat the unidentified fruit growing on my historical property. "Very good advice that I took to heart" As soon as finally open the little husk of the Aunt Molly a customer gave me last year to grow and Removed the husk off the wild plants growing here
I started seeing these little tomatoes ripping to a greenish orange I thought I have seen them before in a book. Well I have been looking through all my books and Catalogs for the last 2 weeks. Well hard work pays off.......It was the Seeds Saver Exchange 2007 Catalog. I remember not ordering the Aunt Molly's that year because I did not understand why there was paper skin. So I ordered the Cerise Orange Cherry tomatoes at another seed Vendor I trusted to have small little cherry that the Contraband Slaves grew here.

I wish there was a picture of the plant in the Catalog. These plants don looking thing like a Tomato Plant.


At that time I did not know that a ground cherry where tomatoes. I did have the wild strawberry growing here, at one time I thought that wee the wild tomatoes brought here by the Contraband slaves. or maybe they where ground cherry. But the Students at William & Mary, Virginia State University and Virginia Tech let me know years ago that they where Wild Strawberry. It could be that Native Americans called the Aunt Molly's wild tomatoes, but are classified as Ground Cherries. In the Description the Seed Saver Exchange used "Ground Cherry were recorded as early as 1837 in Pennsylvania, which is very important to my research. So far the Aunt Molly originally in from Mexico know as a Ground Cherry.

I guess I am a Step Child Fan of Seeds Saver Exchange trying to get to know everyone as I learned from every Staff members for year at there Farm in Decorah, from my computer. I only wish that I visited them in person as I researched the Fruit & Vegetables brought to Hampton by Contraband Slaves.

I started singing and dancing this year with my historical tomatoes & Vegetables. Maybe since all plants have been Identified, maybe I can travel to different Farms Sing and Dance with my Tomatoes, Fruit & Vegetables and sing all the Country Music I want to Sing. But at this time I only singing to Disney Songs and the Children Love my shows Amen!!!!
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Old March 5, 2015   #14
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Default Angel Field 2015 Hawaii Food Research

With the Last Historical Vegetable From Native Plant Identified here at Angel Field: We are now a full Service Historcal Farm focusing on Native American Farming Secrets and our traveling Agriculturist Entertainment for Farms Markets, Schools, and Community Food Education Show.

Angel Field Farms Interview with Hawaiian Farmers February 2015
Thank you to our loyal customers for sticking with us throughout our travels to study the Hawaiian Natives. Angel Field’s food history research took place at the University of Hawaii, with the Native Hawaiians and Farmers themselves. I interview many Women’s Farmers like myself and learned so many secret farming skills, and different uses of historical farming tools. I event took pictures of Chickens waking around the Walmart Shopping center with their own Aloha Spirit. Yes the Chickens greeted me and stop to take a picture. This year we here at "Angel Field Farms" will seek to understand the “Cancer Fighting Fruits & Vegetables research by many Universities across the US on many of the Hawaii heirloom fruits and Vegetables, especially the Plant. But the Hawaiian Natives Knows the Secrets of their Natives Food Supply and will keep these farming and food secrets until they are recognized as Natives Americans. The Native Hawaiian Bill failure was a shocking reality to everyone, even me, that the Bill "did not" pass Congress. I researched this Bill footstep through Congress, with the help of a very nice and patience librarian in Honolulu, and we both cried a little because the Bill would have finally made them Natives Americans, but the Bill fall apart in Congress. The Spirit of the people was very different to me as they dealing with financial stresses but they still have the Aloha Spirit and a Smile on their faces. Thanks to the Students and the Hawaiian people with all their help.
I will complete my research and report my finding on our new website.
http://www.angelfieldfarms.com

By Farmer Joyce Beggs
I suffer from Dyslexia so please try to understand me.
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Old March 17, 2015   #15
MrsJustice
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Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Swiss Chard Heirloom Seeds Fordhook Giant Swiss Chard was brought to the United States by Irish Immigrants around 1861.

Please Contact us with any information about Irish Vegetable History At: http://www.angelfieldfarms.com

An excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin E, and the mineral manganese, and a good source of the mineral zinc, conventional antioxidants, vitamin A “in the form of beta-carotene” Anti-Inflammatory Benefits. This Mediterranean Heirloom got its name from another Mediterranean vegetable, cardoon, celery looking plant with thick stalks that resemble those of chard these very delicious fresh greens made it way to the United States by Irish Immigrates 1861. This variety of “Swiss Chard” become a large commercially Growing U.S. Crops 1920’s. This mammoth strain easily reaches a full 2 feet tall and one of the largest Swiss Chard Varieties we've grown here at Angel Field. Once grown on this historical property as a summer and winter crop. This is the only variety that survived the great Snowy Season This year 2015. Swiss chard is native to Ireland, Mediterranean Region, Greek, and Switzerland. The Greek philosopher, Aristotle wrote about Swiss chard in the fourth century B.C. Angel Field research shows forth Irish Immigrates shared their Swiss Chard Medical Knowledge with the Natives Americans as Native Americans shared their Natives Secrets Plants.
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