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Forum area for discussing hybridizing tomatoes in technical terms and information pertinent to trait/variety specific long-term (1+ years) growout projects.

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Old July 1, 2018   #16
Nan_PA_6b
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I'm glad you decided to do it. You'll have fun & learn a lot. I did.

Nan
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Old July 1, 2018   #17
bower
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Cool... I think you'll find Stupicke an excellent mother.
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Old July 1, 2018   #18
RJGlew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBig46 View Post
Yesterday I sowed the seeds of four varieties pořebných for breeding. Mother- Stupické polní rané. Potential fathers- Sarayev shtanbovyi, Sophie´s choice and Mongolskyi karlik.
Vladimír
Hi Vladimir,

I am very interested to follow your work, and course, your excellent photos are always appreciated. With this project you'll be able to hold us in suspence until you get some determinates with your F2s. Three crosses will keep you & your garden very busy.

rg
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Old July 2, 2018   #19
MrBig46
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I'm sorry I did not start earlier. By the end of September, it's only 90 days. I think I'll put the plants into my hotbed to ripening a little faster. I will do manual pollination at home on plants in containers. Plants pollinated with flowers (small fruits) plantings in the garden then. I'm not sure if I can handle hand pollination. I have to study more, any reference to the instructions welcome.
Vladimír
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Old July 2, 2018   #20
RJGlew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBig46 View Post
I have to study more, any reference to the instructions welcome.
Vladimír
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1Riedng9WY
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Old July 3, 2018   #21
MrBig46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJGlew View Post
Thanks Robert. I hope that will help me.
Vladimír
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Old July 5, 2018   #22
statesman
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I'll be following this interesting project.
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Old July 6, 2018   #23
MrBig46
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Today, I tried to remove the pollen sticks from the flower of tomato Bombeta so that only a pistil to remain. Deploy pollen sticks to the pistil was not so simple. Perhaps I take full opened flower and I will try to transfer the pollen to the pistil.
Vladimír
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Old July 6, 2018   #24
bower
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Vladimir, most people find it easier to collect pollen on a flat surface - the lens from an old pair of sunglasses for example, or a small shallow container - by placing the container under the pollen donor and tap on the flower from behind so that pollen falls down to be collected. It is usually recommended to collect pollen from several flowers, as the state of maturity of the pollen also varies.
You then very gently drag the pistil of the emasculated flower across the pollen covered surface. When the mother is mature and ready to be pollinated, the end of the pistil forms a bit of a knob that you can see and it is sticky then, so that after you drag it through the pollen there's a bare line where pollen was taken up.

Last edited by bower; July 6, 2018 at 12:57 PM. Reason: add
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Old July 7, 2018   #25
MrBig46
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I love the history of growing tomatoes in our country and this history is associated with the name Jaroslav Homola author of Stupices. His article in Garden Magazine inspired me to grow tomatoes in the hotbed. He bred variety directly intended for cultivation in hotbeds.
He crossed the Mikado x Sláva Porýní x Bellevue Bush x Solanum racemigerum that is almost like the Stupice x Bellevue Bush. Of many different plants, he chose the one that had the first blooms behind the sixth leaf, then the leaves and other flowers. On the 3rd to 4th leaf the main stem ended growth. During the youth, 3-4 shoots were formed under the first inflorescence (later with the flowers).
I thought it might be the tomato Urbikany (Vrbičanské nízké), but none of the plants I cultivated from seeds from different sources didn´t look like that. I do not know if the tomato for the hotbed was ever recognized as a new variety and as it was called.
That's why I decided to cross the Stupice with some determinant tomatoes. Maybe it will appear some tomato with flowers behind the sixth or seventh leaves
Vladimír
PS.: I add a copy of this article (if any of you know Czech)
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File Type: jpg ZL1949 2 Homola.JPG (341.5 KB, 78 views)
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Old July 20, 2018   #26
MrBig46
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Always four seedlings in one pot. In a week, I divide them, each seedling into one pot. I do not have much time but I hope some mature tomatoes F1 will have this year.
Vladimír
PS.: Stupice (Sempra), Sophie´s choice, Mongolskyi karlik and Sarayev Shtambovyi
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Old August 10, 2018   #27
MrBig46
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All plants outside the Mongolian karlik already have deployed flowers. Next week I will pollinate. I do not know if one day I can remove the anthers from the flower of the mother and the second or the next day to pollinate. I do not know how flowers of different varieties will develop.
Vladimír
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Old August 10, 2018   #28
Nan_PA_6b
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Yes, you can remove anthers one day and pollinate on another day, if you wish.
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Old August 11, 2018   #29
MrBig46
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Thanks.
Vladimír
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Old August 30, 2018   #30
MrBig46
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Before the holidays, I tried to remove the pollen sticks from the Stupické polní rané. Not once failed it ( ten to fifteen experiments). I regret it. I'll try again in the winter.
Vladimír
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