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Old June 21, 2017   #1
Nematode
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Default Pale Jimmy Nardello

So this plant and a couple others are quite pale in the top.
These have been getting hand watered with nutrient solution. They remained hydrated, but were not really on a schedule.

So the JN that are fruiting are pretty paleup top, is this nutrient deprivation due to heavy fruit load or something more sinister?
There are JN that are not really fruiting get that are normal green.

More info, some but not all the roots were not bright white at transplant.


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Old June 21, 2017   #2
Labradors2
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My sweet peppers are looking rather pale too. I think it might be because we've had a lot of rain!

Linda
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Old June 21, 2017   #3
RayR
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The overall look of the plants seems to indicate Nitrogen and Iron deficiencies, maybe Sulfur too but then you have to ask why if you have other pepper plants growing in the same soil with the same PH, same nutrients, watering and all and they are much healthier. So is the stress induced by other factors?

All roots on transplants are not always bright white, some staining can occur from humic acids. Really dark roots can indicate root rot from pathogens like Pythium, but the health of the transplant above ground would have shown poor health symptoms too.

It's all speculation at this point.
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Old June 21, 2017   #4
Nematode
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My thoughts were nutrient deficiency also.
Just speculating that the plants with fruit were sacrificing the leaves for the fruit.
They are on automatic feed now, hopefully they will green right up.
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Old June 22, 2017   #5
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The #1 problem of early season chillies in the north east is too much water. We get some nice weather in May and put out our plants, and then for the next three weeks it's cloudy and rainy with cool nights.

If you've been feeding them on any kind of reasonable schedule it's probably not nutrient deficiency. My plants get tomato tone every three weeks, and then a shot of miracle gro mixed at 50% once a month or so. By August my plants are always massive.

Hopefully now that chili weather has arrived you're plants will take off.
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Old June 26, 2017   #6
Nematode
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Peppers are greening up on regular feedings.
It was definitely a deciciency. Those 3 were bearing quite well, and everything they got which wasn't much, went to the fruits.
Will have to do a better job feeding in the tunnel next spring.
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