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Old January 10, 2018   #31
Black Krim
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Grushovka #4717 (30 seeds) Siberian variety of delicious, pink, egg-shaped fruit. Tomatoes are about 3 inches long with thin skin and are excellent for canning. Plants are small, only about 2-1/2 feet tall, but produce abundantly. Determinate. 65 days.

This is another variety offered by TomatoGrowers---thoughts??
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Old January 10, 2018   #32
pmcgrady
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How early do you set these out? ANd at what size? What type of protection?
Last year I started seeds in mid February our average last frost is April 15, I planted a hundred foot row that included Cole, 0-33, Fireworks, Big Beef and Juane Flamme under black plastic mulch around April 20th, unfortunately I wasn't paying attention and that first row got a bad case of EB, after I treated them with bleach spray, they were severely stunted. I got tomatoes from all plants but can't give an opinion of them because of the EB. I'm trying them again this year and spray a preventive early also.
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Old January 10, 2018   #33
Black Krim
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Doing more sleuthing---

red robin--maybe not--likes 65 degrees, but tolerates indoors
Red Robin #6010 (30 seeds) This popular dwarf variety of cherry tomato thrives in relatively small pots or hanging baskets set on sunny windowsills or outdoor patios. Plants only become 8 to 12 in. tall and bear masses of 1-1/4 inch full-flavored tomatoes with a touch of sweetness. It is a very rewarding harvest from a small tomato plant that can be grown in an 8-inch pot. Determinate 55 days.





Grushovka #4717 (30 seeds) Siberian variety of delicious, pink, egg-shaped fruit. Tomatoes are about 3 inches long with thin skin and are excellent for canning. Plants are small, only about 2-1/2 feet tall, but produce abundantly. Determinate. 65 days.

Last edited by Black Krim; January 11, 2018 at 11:27 AM. Reason: wrong description
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Old January 10, 2018   #34
Black Krim
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Originally Posted by pmcgrady View Post
Last year I started seeds in mid February our average last frost is April 15, I planted a hundred foot row that included Cole, 0-33, Fireworks, Big Beef and Juane Flamme under black plastic mulch around April 20th, unfortunately I wasn't paying attention and that first row got a bad case of EB, after I treated them with bleach spray, they were severely stunted. I got tomatoes from all plants but can't give an opinion of them because of the EB. I'm trying them again this year and spray a preventive early also.
This is very helpful, as you are in IL figured you deal with cold, more cold than I do. You skip the tunnel and use black plastic to warm the soil.

Average last frost is May 5 here.

Is EB typical or more likely for very early planting?? Something a row cover could prevent?
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Old January 10, 2018   #35
Andrey_BY
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Grushovka is a dwarf plant (0,5-0,7 m high) with rather good flavour, but usually it is a mid early to midseason variety (110-115 days after seed germination; 60-65 days after transplant).
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Old January 10, 2018   #36
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This is very helpful, as you are in IL figured you deal with cold, more cold than I do. You skip the tunnel and use black plastic to warm the soil.

Average last frost is May 5 here.

Is EB typical or more likely for very early planting?? Something a row cover could prevent?
I remember Harding them off for 1-2 weeks and having to bring plants indoors a couple of times before I planted out.
I planted 5-100ft rows spaced 5 or so days apart, the first row was the only one that had problems. And every varity in that row had problems.
Ideally black plastic mulch and a low tunnel might be the way to go.
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Old January 10, 2018   #37
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Originally Posted by Andrey_BY View Post
Grushovka is a dwarf plant (0,5-0,7 m high) with rather good flavour, but usually it is a mid early to midseason variety (110-115 days after seed germination; 60-65 days after transplant).
Size is good. Cold tolerant in your opinion?
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Old January 10, 2018   #38
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I remember Harding them off for 1-2 weeks and having to bring plants indoors a couple of times before I planted out.
I planted 5-100ft rows spaced 5 or so days apart, the first row was the only one that had problems. And every varity in that row had problems.
Ideally black plastic mulch and a low tunnel might be the way to go.
A lot of plants to move! Im curious, why plant each variety 5 days apart?
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Old January 10, 2018   #39
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The Saraev are listed at Tantiana's. Does anyone have experience with any of the varieties? 0-33 is there too.
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Old January 10, 2018   #40
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A lot of plants to move! Im curious, why plant each variety 5 days apart?
1 person, that's about all I can/care to get planted in a day... then in 5 days I feel like planting more!
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Old January 11, 2018   #41
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1 person, that's about all I can/care to get planted in a day... then in 5 days I feel like planting more!
I commend your effort. My question was poorly worded. I meant, why succession planting? If Im understanding that this is sucession planting......
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Old January 11, 2018   #42
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Stupice and Matina are similar to growth and taste. They are indeterminate tomatoes. I think they are not particularly cold-resistant. Varieties bred in Russia Sarayevem are mostly cold-resistant and determinant (bush).
Vladimír
Again, thank you. Nice listing at Tantiana's under word "saraev".
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Old January 11, 2018   #43
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I wrote: Stupice and Matina are similar to growth and taste.
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Old January 11, 2018   #44
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I forgot to mention Joseph's tomatoes here. You should read up on how his short season led to him breeding short season cold hardy tomatoes. His seeds are here. http://garden.lofthouse.com/seed-list.phtml I'm growing Big Hill for sure this year and may be growing Ot'Jagodka and Fern as well.
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Old January 11, 2018   #45
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I commend your effort. My question was poorly worded. I meant, why succession planting? If Im understanding that this is sucession planting......
Succession planting is not putting all your eggs in the same basket... If I would have planted all 5 rows when I did the first one, all rows would probably have EB. Each row ripened at different times ( there were many other varieties I planted) which stretched out the season and I wasn't swamped with too many tomatoes at one time. I had ripe tomatoes till the first frost.
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