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Old December 25, 2017   #5281
Worth1
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I have but one thing to say about prime rib or standing rib roast.
Marinate and cook with Madeira, you cant go wrong.
If you cant find it get sweet Marsala.
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Old December 25, 2017   #5282
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I might play with some bellies too. I watched a vid and the guy cured it for a week then wrapped it tightly in cheese cloth and hung it in the fridge for 3 weeks and it came out awesome.
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Old December 25, 2017   #5283
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My SIL's christmas duck dinner was amazing. The duck was rare, marinade involved citrus and also cherries plums and roasted peach, and there were whole cherries amongst the vegetables - smoky mushrooms, tangy brussel sprouts. Mashed turnip "with a little vanilla" was a wow. Gnocchi I have never had before, these were made with celeriac what a flavor.
My only regret: I didn't overeat. The weather got nasty before dark, with a mix of ice pellets and freezing rain, so I headed home before it got too thick.
I'm now thinking about cooking something tonight, because there's crazy wind forecast for tomorrow, best chance of a power outage and the time to have something cold but not frozen. Or else in the slow cooker, staying hot.
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Old December 25, 2017   #5284
mensplace
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Default Hoppin John

Who will be celebrating Jan 1 with this southern delicacy?
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Old December 25, 2017   #5285
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensplace View Post
Who will be celebrating Jan 1 with this southern delicacy?
You mean blackeyes? I looked at recipes for Hopping John today because I was looking for different peas but it seems like a normal blackeye pea dish we always cook.

Post your recipe so I can compare it to what's normal here if you don't minds.

Don't forget the cabbage either!!!!!!
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Old December 25, 2017   #5286
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajun Gardener View Post
You mean blackeyes? I looked at recipes for Hopping John today because I was looking for different peas but it seems like a normal blackeye pea dish we always cook.

Post your recipe so I can compare it to what's normal here if you don't minds.

Don't forget the cabbage either!!!!!!
Never heard of cabbage in or with Hoppin John, but there are approaches as there are stories of where it came from. In fact I was raised on the story that it came from those who only had the most basic ingredients like dried southern peas...not English peas, rice, and, if lucky, hog jowl. It is not a Cajun dish like many assert, nor does it have a myriad of ingredients. The simplicity is reflected in it being a dish representing when there was little or nothing and the wishful hope for a better new year. Beyond the basics, you can doctor the two key ingredients however you please. I won't go onto the story of it's roots that was passed down from my aged grandmother in the fifties.

Some in the low country like red eyed peas and others tiny field peas.

For a side dish there was always collard greens, though others preferred other types. The collards were more traditional.

Last edited by mensplace; December 25, 2017 at 09:54 PM.
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Old December 25, 2017   #5287
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That wasn't meant to be derogatory or question your heritage, I really wanted a Hoppin John recipe besides the normal commercial recipes you see online.

We always eat black-eyed peas and cabbage on New Years Day, it's just the way it has been forever so we may have some things in common. Those are two dishes, not peas and greens. Black-eyes are for good luck/health and cabbage is for prosperity/wealth. I understand the reasons and stories but I'd like to hear yours, we can't lose old history from our past.

I'm sure you can relate to this interpretation, copied from the last link.

Peas were considered animal food and not fit for Union soldiers. That meant peas were the only food that was left for the Confederate forces and families to eat. These Southerners considered themselves lucky to have a meal of peas and salt pork in the dead of winter.

Check the link below and have a Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year!!!!

https://www.thespruce.com/new-years-...-greens-101706

http://973thedawg.com/black-eyed-pea...new-years-why/
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Old December 25, 2017   #5288
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Hence the reason they are known as cow peas.
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Old December 25, 2017   #5289
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So true.
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Old December 25, 2017   #5290
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Rajun, no way taken as any kind of offence. I'm just tired after tending to everything today. The wife had a bout of intestinal flu yesterday, so she has bee feeling awful. When I was able to conjure up one meal today...Oriental greens of several sorts with Japanese seasoning and rice...she at least got down a bit of the rice seasoned with the liquid for vitamins and minerals. I only put the soy on mine. That was Christmas.

Anyway, I wasn't thinking of the Cajun part to distinguish the one from the other. Many Acadians, Africans, French, Creole, Gullah, English and Jews were in Charleston very early on. It was once the largest city in the U.S. and also the home port for many Buccaneers.

SC was hit especially hard in the low country. I doubt there were many domestic pigs left...or much else after Billy's boys went through. Anyway, later black and yellow eyed peas as well as red eyed peas came from the coastal islands. Some prefer the tiny field peas, while others use various colors of Crowder peas. Always soak for at least 24 hours. Canned peas turn too mushy. I use Chicken stock in the peas as well as pork... whether cured, smoked or tasso. You should end up with enough pot liquor to pour over the rice. Many include vegetables in cooling the peas. The basics might be onion and celery, but others could include the trinity or even more. I prefer to taste the peas. For the rice, I prefer long grained white that is plain and flaky when done, with generous butter, pot liquor, and peas on top. Tradition is to throw in a dime.

The collards are well cooked with pork, a touch of vinegar, and a small bit of sugar.

Generally, my plate ends up mixed with a liberal hit of Texas a Louisiana hot sauce...totally untraditional as many folks here like that white vinegar and whole red pepper mess.

Anyway, the basics came from elsewhere originally...just like barbacoa, but after Sherman many were starving, carried in wagon sixties miles into the country and dumped, or the women and children placed into box cars and shipped to Louisville or other points north and never seen again. Many had no homes left, so Jan 1 became a day of remembering times without any food, so even the simplest that could be found was a luxury.

Most poultry and livestock was either seized or slaughtered and left by the roadsides to rot.
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Old December 26, 2017   #5291
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I had to look up a, "Hoppin John" recipe to know what it was. We've always just called that "Black Eyed Peas"

For something a little different - grow some Black Eyed Peas and harvest them at the early snap size stage, Cut/break them into bite size pieces and freeze them until you're ready to use them in a pot of BEPs. Bean snaps will work too, but they do not have the same taste.
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Old December 26, 2017   #5292
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I ate more black eyed peas and snaps growing up than I care to remember.
The same with crowder peas.
We almost never had ham.
The farm raised beef steaks were ruined by over cooking due to theological law.
Here we were eating pork, catfish, shellfish, rabbits and squirrel but no rare beef.
Never could understand that, questioned it got slapped and ran from the table.
How dare you question my authority.

What we did have a lot of was pork breakfast sausage.
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Old December 26, 2017   #5293
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Still haven't discovered why entire notes just disappear when typing.

Anyway, Hopping John and greens were enjoyed on Jan 1 as a matter of memory and respect just as many other regions have special foods and days to honor and reflect...like fish pickled with lye in Scandinavian areas of our country.

I have pictures of both my Southern and northern predecessors, but what I learned on my grandmother's knees and the simplicity of Hopping John in its purist form once a year isn't different in intent than others who eat bitter herbs and flatbread.

TRADITION. Lest we forget.
The land was used for cotton and tobacco.
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Old December 26, 2017   #5294
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Mystery key I have had it happen to me too.
Poof everything gone.
Worth
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Old December 26, 2017   #5295
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Homemade cocktail sauce.
Ketchup.
Horse radish.
Lime juice.
Worcestershire sauce.
Fermented ghost pepper sauce.
Pennies on the dollar to make.

Worth
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