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Old March 11, 2018   #1
Worth1
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Default Product Bias Opinions.

I just wonder how much good useful information can be given to people if the opinion comes from unfair bias and the individual not being objective?

Just something to consider.
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Old March 11, 2018   #2
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Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
I just wonder how much good useful information can be given to people if the opinion comes from unfair bias and the individual not being objective?

Just something to consider.
I'm not sure there is an answer to this question. If you are talking growing tomatoes and products used to grow tomatoes, it would be a personal experience matter.

If Joe Blow owns Wonderful Tomato Fertilizer and registers as EverydayGardener just to promote his product, that's one thing.

If I use Wonderful Tomato Fertilizer in Missouri and have the best crop of tomatoes ever and sing its praises, that's my experience.

If TimmyTomato in Florida uses the same product and has a terrible experience, he might think I work for the company and post just to get him to buy the fertilizer.

I think I just confused myself!
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Old March 11, 2018   #3
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Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
I just wonder how much good useful information can be given to people if the opinion comes from unfair bias and the individual not being objective?

Just something to consider.
Bias is often disguised as Ignorance
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Old March 11, 2018   #4
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Bias is often disguised as Ignorance
Maybe that should be reversed
Ignorance is often disguised as Bias
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Old March 11, 2018   #5
Hairy Moose Knuckles
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I think different situations may play a role too. What works for me, may not necessarily work for you. It's good to experiment and try things though. Don't take everything as fact. Try it for yourself. I was told my clay soil wouldn't grow peanuts, but peanuts I did grow cause I'm too hardheaded to listen.



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Old March 11, 2018   #6
Worth1
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Originally Posted by mikemansker View Post
I'm not sure there is an answer to this question. If you are talking growing tomatoes and products used to grow tomatoes, it would be a personal experience matter.

If Joe Blow owns Wonderful Tomato Fertilizer and registers as EverydayGardener just to promote his product, that's one thing.

If I use Wonderful Tomato Fertilizer in Missouri and have the best crop of tomatoes ever and sing its praises, that's my experience.

If TimmyTomato in Florida uses the same product and has a terrible experience, he might think I work for the company and post just to get him to buy the fertilizer.

I think I just confused myself!
Leaving out all the stuff about working for or owning a company.

It is just fine to say your product is the best that is just advertising regardless of what that product may be.
As of late I have seen people not necessarily here go on about a product and when they find nothing wrong with that product.
And even demonstrate that the product is better or as good as their favorite product they will still trash it.
This confounds me to no end and is subjective reasoning and not a good evaluation of said product.


I was asked some time ago by someone here to get them some fertilizer.
That person lived an another country and they couldn't get it.
The person on the phone I talked to said flat out that the expense of the stuff to ship wasn't worth it because their product wasn't any better than anything the requester could get over seas.
So I dropped it and left it at that.
At least the company representative was honest and being objective with no bias towards their product, this is rare.

When I say product that can mean a thing, place, idea, or person.

An example would be someone saying so and so fried chicken sucks.
They are asked why.
They say because it is bland.
No that is bias because they like spices not because the product sucks due to some other discrepancy like it being raw or crawling with roaches.

Another example would be a person doesn't like a brand of fertilizer or soil because it is owned by a big conglomerate.
Maybe they tried one of their products and it was bad but one they didn't try is good but they have no idea because of biased thought due to the bad experience from one and say the other is bad.

Worth
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Old March 11, 2018   #7
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Ok I will admit that I binged on self-improvement articles at a link PondGardener posted last week.. One of them was about bias, it was kind of interesting. The notion iirc, is that we only notice results that are memorable, and forget the results that are just mediocre or not outstanding. So for example:

Used product with great results.

Used product with average results.

The great results are memorable so ... that's what we remember. We forget the less outstanding things and even make excuses for them.
I know if I'm trying to really learn something I have to write down the data. I really won't remember otherwise. I can be really surprised if I compare "my conclusions" as in what I thought in general terms after the fact, with what I actually wrote down at one time or another.

As for people's reports about what they used or liked on this forum, I really like it when everybody chimes in and says what they do, and the more different ideas the better I like it. lol: I keep an open mind and many times I think about trying one different thing or another because someone said it worked for them. Or some things I'll never try because I know already they won't work for me, but it's interesting to hear anyway how others did it.
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Old March 11, 2018   #8
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Social media has given everyone, regardless of how informed or uninformed, to express their opinion anonymously without accepting any responsibility. I can't think of anything more destructive.

I agree that ignorance and bias are pretty much the same. I buy a lot of stuff on Amazon and I always look at the reviews. You can take a product (like fertilizer) that has a thousand reviews and 80 percent are positive. When you look at the one star, you're likely to get something like "This is total junk. I used three times as much as they say and all my plants died."
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Old March 11, 2018   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hairy Moose Knuckles View Post
I think different situations may play a role too. What works for me, may not necessarily work for you. It's good to experiment and try things though. Don't take everything as fact. Try it for yourself. I was told my clay soil wouldn't grow peanuts, but peanuts I did grow cause I'm too hardheaded to listen.


You see, I dont even consider your soil clay.

You want to see some clay soil go out to where I used to live in Cedar Creek.
It is just like potters clay for many feet down with a bit of gravel and sandy loam on top.
Water would stand for days on end.
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Old March 11, 2018   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemansker View Post
Social media has given everyone, regardless of how informed or uninformed, to express their opinion anonymously without accepting any responsibility. I can't think of anything more destructive.

I agree that ignorance and bias are pretty much the same. I buy a lot of stuff on Amazon and I always look at the reviews. You can take a product (like fertilizer) that has a thousand reviews and 80 percent are positive. When you look at the one star, you're likely to get something like "This is total junk. I used three times as much as they say and all my plants died."
I read the same reviews on fishing poles.
Many were good and some were the tip broke off the first day.
Obviously by a car door.

We talked about Gorilla Marketing just the other day at work.
I tell you this young guy I work with comes up with some crazy stuff.
One was a product everyone thought was trash.
You simply put your product with name and where to buy in the picture of the review.
It may or may not get pulled but the damage is already done and people have seen it.
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Old March 11, 2018   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemansker View Post
Social media has given everyone, regardless of how informed or uninformed, to express their opinion anonymously without accepting any responsibility. I can't think of anything more destructive.

I agree that ignorance and bias are pretty much the same. I buy a lot of stuff on Amazon and I always look at the reviews. You can take a product (like fertilizer) that has a thousand reviews and 80 percent are positive. When you look at the one star, you're likely to get something like "This is total junk. I used three times as much as they say and all my plants died."
Try this , it really works

https://www.fakespot.com/
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Old March 12, 2018   #12
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When reading reviews on Amazon, I always start with the 3-stars. I find them to be the most realistic, balanced, and typically unbiased.

There was a story on the local news recently about a couple that had almost daily Amazon shipments of small and inexpensive items appearing at their door--all addressed to them, but nothing that they'd ordered. The orders were placed using a multitude of Amazon accounts and paid for with untraceable Amazon gift cards. Whoever was placing the orders could then log in to Amazon and give the product a glowing 5-star review with the little "Verified Purchase" banner at the top.
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Old March 12, 2018   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hairy Moose Knuckles View Post
I was told my clay soil wouldn't grow peanuts, but peanuts I did grow cause I'm too hardheaded to listen.

Not only that, but it looks like you got yourself a peanut cantaloupe hybrid there! If only that cantaloupe weren't so small, you would make millions!
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Old March 12, 2018   #14
Hairy Moose Knuckles
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Yeah, it was my failed attempt at a cross. My breeding program just wasn't up to mustard thatbyear. Hahahaaa
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