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Old March 3, 2018   #31
kath
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Thanks PaulF! That seems like a fun strategy. I would be interested what you end up with in terms of comparisons at the end of the season.
Katie
Me, too!

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Old March 3, 2018   #32
salix
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I too would love to have that skid steer machine - but with a big bucket to remove the 5 foot snowbanks! It got down to - 20 C last night, still only -12 C...

So, won't be sowing my approx. 80 varieties of tomatoes until end of March. All of the alliums get sown at end of Feb., then a few more categories every week until the squash is given a couple of weeks head-start at the end of May. It's a good thing we have such long daylight hours in summer to make up for the short season!
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Old March 12, 2018   #33
neverwinter
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I am looking to grow these in the summer:
Toronjina
Sakura
Black Cherry
Marnero
Margold
Marbonne
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Old March 12, 2018   #34
Hairy Moose Knuckles
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A general question for everyone - how do you decide which varieties to plant each year? I'm sure it is different for everyone but it would be interesting to learn.


That's a good question to elaborate on. I can only answer for myself, but here's how I decide. I did 42 varieties this year and have about 160 plants. I used to do twice and sometimes thrice that amount, but I'm not healthy anymore. I'm having to have all my work done for me now. Here's how my playbook came about. Me and wife pulled out the pickle jar and looked at what we had grown in the pasts along with what we wanted to grow but never got a chance. I had also received new to me varieties this year. We know several varieties always or at least most times do well, so those get put in a pile. I keep all the little notes and stories people send me relating to the seeds they send. We went through those and selected some. I like potato leaf plants, so I select some of those. Some have interesting names and we pick a few of those. I know a few breeders and I select some of the ones they recommend. It's impossible to grow out every variety every year, so if I have seeds that are several years old, I try and get them back in the rotation, so I have fresh seeds.


I believe I have 42 varieties. These are for spring. I haven't chose Fall tomatoes yet.

Yellow Submarine
Lollipop
Haley's Purple Comet
Dice's Mystery Black
Tommy Toe
Tonadose Des Conores
Chocolate Cherry
Isis Candy
Snow White
Mystery Grape
Frosty Pink Plum
Ruby Pearl
Black Cherry
Baby Beefsteak
Eeau's Mystery Red
Black Plum
Fuzzy Peach
Farmer Red's
Costoluto Genovese
Wisconson 55
Lithuanian
Stump of the World
Big Cheef
Hillbilly
Bonnie Best
Mexico
Thessaloniki Oxheart
JD Special C Tex
1884
Ikie
Daniels
Purple Haze F6
Iva's Red Berry
Sweet Beverly
Sara's Galapagos
Nepal
Rebel Alliance
Dwarf Striped Rumplestiltskin
1884 Purple
2 different tomatoes from farmers market for kicks.

Last edited by Hairy Moose Knuckles; March 12, 2018 at 02:14 PM.
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Old March 12, 2018   #35
PotGarden
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A general question for everyone - how do you decide which varieties to plant each year? I'm sure it is different for everyone but it would be interesting to learn.
Space constraints. If I could, I'd grow at least a few hundred.

I'm growing varieties from the Dwarf Tomato Project, micros as part of dfollett's project to find micro multifloras and lots of other micros, and a few larger varieties.

Adelaide Festival, Kookaburra Cackler, Perth Pride, Tasmanian Chocolate and others yet to be decided.

Matina, Alpatieva 905A, Black Cherry, Big Beef, Stick, Stupice, Sungold.

Micros: Andrina, Aztek, Baby, Birdie Rouge, Floragold Basket, Gold Pearl, Hahms Gelbe Topftomate, Jochalos, Orange Hat, Patio, Pinnochio Orange, Red Profusion, Red Robin, Sweet for Children, Yellow Canary, Yellow Dwarf and others not yet decided.

About 12 varieties of peppers, sweet and hot (Aleppo, Cubanelle, Fehrer Ozon, Frank's, Jalapeno Early, M and a large one whose name has temporarily slipped my mind) and others.

Herbs: Vietnamese Cilantro, many basils, three different chives, lemon verbena, many parsleys, rose scented geranium, bay, four rosemary varieties, four sages, four mints, stevia, brahmi, lime balm, sweetgrass, tarragon, three thymes, two oregano, marjoram, gotu kola and others.

If I find more space all bets are off!

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Old March 12, 2018   #36
hl2601
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Chad and Pia-
Tell me more about GarnetxBlack Krim?! Is this your cross? Sounds like a great one!

Paul- I second Kath-would love to hear your takes on flavor profiles and yields as you compare all your blacks and hearts. Those are two of my favorite groups as well. Please do let us all know and have a terrific growing season!
Heide
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Old March 12, 2018   #37
chadandpia
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Hi hl2601,

It's a cross created by another member here, id is Gardenboy. Here is his original link discussing the Garnet x Black Krim cross he discovered in is garden.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...net+black+krim
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Old March 12, 2018   #38
carolyn137
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Little Miss Dixie*

Would that be Little Dixie, bred by Bill Jeffers,if so I love it, but if not how is Little Miss Dixie different.

And I haven't the faintest Idea of which seeds I'll give to Rob, a local person,who has been raising my plants for me and enough to share with a few folks in my area.

Right now I'm almost seedless, that's tomato seeds ,since I sent so many to Shawn for the seed offer, now up in the trade subforum. But the good news is that Shawn would send back to me any varieties I wanted, and of newest ones I sourced,there's a lot to chose from.

Carolyn
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Old March 12, 2018   #39
Nan_PA_6b
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Quote:
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A general question for everyone - how do you decide which varieties to plant each year? I'm sure it is different for everyone but it would be interesting to learn.
How do I decide what to grow each year.

The ones my husband requests: this year it's 3 cherries, Dr. Carolyn, Post Office Spoonful, and Sungold.

Another cherry because I got free seeds with an order, and I like to have 4-5 cherries, and it'll look good colorwise mixed with the rest: Wild Tiger.

Something that makes great fried green tomatoes (I love them!): Dotson's Lebanese Heart.

Very rare (in the US) foreign varieties were offered to me by generous overseas Tomatovillians and I want to save seeds to get them into circulation quickly here. Romanian: Buzau 22, Buzau 47, Inima de Bou, Timpurii. Spanish: Colgar Alacon, Flor de Artana, Ramallet des Figueral, Ramallet Ibiza Blanca, Ramallet San Llorens. Italian: Pomodoro di Sorrento, Pomodoro sel. Sorrento.

Since I introduced Post Office Spoonful, I wish to grow Post Office Runt, a smaller-fruited variation that showed up this past season.

I have info on over 600 tomato varieties in a spreadsheet that I have investigated to see if I'm interested in growing them. I try some of the best ones each year: Kosovo, Mat-Su Express.

Targinnie Red, a hollow "stuffer" tomato, because I want cute hors d'ouvres.

This year, I wanted to try a determinate to jump-start the tomato season with an all-at-once crop: Heinz 1439 (chosen because my grandmother worked at the old Heinz plant in Pittsburgh).

I'm developing my own tomato, growing out the F2's this year: RAE-F2.
I want to compare the taste of the tomato I'm developing to the taste of: Hardin's Mini.

Nan
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Old March 12, 2018   #40
Hairy Moose Knuckles
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Hi hl2601,

It's a cross created by another member here, id is Gardenboy. Here is his original link discussing the Garnet x Black Krim cross he discovered in is garden.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...net+black+krim


I'll be growing it this fall too. It sounds like a dandy.
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Old March 12, 2018   #41
menken
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Wow it is so fun to see how you all choose! I already have a list three times as long as I have room for in my garden - mostly just from reading what you all have said is good - so I think for the next few years I will just try to grow as wide a variety as I can in my small yard.
I know it must sound strange to everyone here but I have never tried a purple tomato or a green-when-ripe tomato or most of the 'common' heirlooms. I just know I like homegrown tomatoes and I finally have a sunny yard. In doing research the tomato world opened up to me.
Katie
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Old March 12, 2018   #42
Spartanburg123
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Here are my varieties:

Terhune (5.42 AKMark), RL
GGWT
Post Office Spoonful
Not Purple Strawberry
Bear Creek
Daniel Burson
Lucky Cross
Rebel Yell
Akers WV
Dotson's Lebanese Heart

And I'm planning on adding Early Girl, Zena's Gift, and another of KarenO's faves
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Old March 13, 2018   #43
Hervey
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Sun Sugar
Pink Princess
Candy Sweet Icicle
Iva's Red Berry
Sunrise Bumblebee
Green Doctor's Frosted
Matt's Wild Cherry
Gnoccia di Limone
Juan Flammee
Faworyt
Azoychka
Druzba
Bulgarian Triumph
Mennonite Orange
Crnkovic Yugoslavian
Girl Girl’s Weird Thing
Aunt Ruby's German Green
Anna Russian
Black
KBX
Brandywine
Brandy Boy
Purple Dog Creek
Pruden's Purple
Rebel Yell
Little Lucky
Earl's Faux
Aunt Ginny's Purple
Neve's Azorean Red
Kosovo
Big Cheef
Biyskaya Roza
Cherokee Lime
Ananas Noire
Egyptian
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Old March 13, 2018   #44
nancyruhl
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I'm also growing one medium variety: 'Early Detroit' that I purchased from Victory Seeds.

I am glad to see someone else growing this historic variety. I have grown it for the last two years. It isn't as early as my go to earlies like Matina and Maya and Sion's, but it puts out some very tasty, pretty pink, crack free tomatoes fairly early. I think you will be pleased.

I posted my list in another thread. On my recent trip home from Florida, I found the wild flowers already blooming in the Smokies, some thing I have not witnessed before on the annual trek home. That makes me hopeful of an early spring, so I have already planted seeds for the dwarfs and earlies, as well as peppers. The others will go in this week. I am really hoping for a drier April than last year, which reeked havoc on last season's seedlings.
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Old March 13, 2018   #45
Koala Doug
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I am glad to see someone else growing this historic variety. I have grown it for the last two years. It isn't as early as my go to earlies like Matina and Maya and Sion's, but it puts out some very tasty, pretty pink, crack free tomatoes fairly early. I think you will be pleased.
This will be my first time growing Early Detroit, so I'm pretty excited to see how it turns out.

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