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Old February 27, 2018   #1
taboule
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Default Early spring?

From Wapo: Spring is running 20 days early. It’s exactly what we expect, but it’s not good.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.167b2de7c664
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Old February 27, 2018   #2
bower
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It is certainly true for tree crops and perennials.

We have always had a fickle climate here, a lot of variation from year to year, unseasonable thaws and unseasonable freezes. I planted a variety of non-native trees to see how they would do. Mostly they are out of step with spring. European Alder and Hazelnuts will start to bloom in early thaws, then frost kills the pollen often before pollination has taken place. So there are not many nuts or seeds produced. Others like Ginkgo, White Mulberry and Boreal Oak are so late to leaf out, often the middle of June before they have a leaf on and of course the season is very soon over after that. I think adaptations to climate/seasonal change are quite fixed in these species and only occur very gradually and slowly in nature as habitat opens up to the north, and they move very slowly by generations km by km further into a different zone. I've not seen any sign that the individual trees, selected by seed for winter hardiness, were able to change their seasonal responses to fit this climate over years of growing here, being parachuted thousands of km north of their native range.

The same would apply to cherries, almonds and other precocious blooming fruit/nut trees further south, if climate change caused them to bloom before the frosts are finished. They are not adapted to it, there isn't a response that the individual tree can bring to improve its own survival.
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Old February 27, 2018   #3
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Paint the trunks white and pack ice around them during warm spells.

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Old February 28, 2018   #4
Black Krim
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I now have a reason to be happy having a plot of earth on the north side of a hill.
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Old February 28, 2018   #5
bower
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Krim View Post
I now have a reason to be happy having a plot of earth on the north side of a hill.
Yep. North facing slopes recommended for the nut trees.
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Old February 28, 2018   #6
Black Krim
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Quote:
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Yep. North facing slopes recommended for the nut trees.
THanks for mentioning this. Nut trees made me nervous to plant. Butternut is wild here-- a few dot the property. ANd a few hickory. Takes a squirrel to open those!

I have drooled for years over the improved varieties that are easier to open and now the land will open up after two devastating years of gypsey moths killing most ofthe huge oaks ......replant with nut trees etc.

Suggetions?
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Old February 28, 2018   #7
bower
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Quote:
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THanks for mentioning this. Nut trees made me nervous to plant. Butternut is wild here-- a few dot the property. ANd a few hickory. Takes a squirrel to open those!

I have drooled for years over the improved varieties that are easier to open and now the land will open up after two devastating years of gypsey moths killing most ofthe huge oaks ......replant with nut trees etc.

Suggetions?
It depends how much space you have. Chestnuts look good for your area, and they're super easy to open! (Wish I had tried chestnuts...)
https://www.tytyga.com/Chestnut-Trees-s/1891.htm

Hazels are quite small, more of a shrub than a tree. Pine nuts can take a long time to mature, but if you have room to diversify the type of nuts you grow, that's always a good way to hedge your bets, so to speak. Read about the available trees, guess at which ones would be a best bet and....
https://www.tytyga.com/Nut-Trees-s/1826.htm

The other thing I recall about microclimate, you have to be sure not to place a windbreak or shelterbelt at the bottom of a slope, where it can dam up the cold air. There is a lot you can do to design the microenvironment and better your chances (Hedging bets - pun not intended!)

For sure you'll find lots of info about that online.
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Old February 28, 2018   #8
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THanks. Will do more research.

I have looked at a section of the land that is a couple acres to turn into nut trees and other fruiting trees but the full mature oaks were too valuable to remove. THe gypsy moths have killed many of these trees, so the space is large that is available.

Years before the upper section was burned in a fire about 20 years ago, the saplings were havested 2 years for stakes. And replaced with 3 mulberry, expecting 30-50 ft size.

The air flows up and down hill depending on the air temps! I figured it was good for the local vegetation to decrease disease. I will continue to keep this and not plant any bush type plants that will slow or block the flow.

THanks for the suggestions.
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Old March 1, 2018   #9
sjamesNorway
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Default The beast from the east

We're definitely not having an early spring in Norway. In fact, most of Europe is feeling a Siberian freeze, they're calling "the beast from the east". Today, March first, we have one of the coldest temps. so far this winter at -10*F. It's supposed to last for a week.
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Old March 1, 2018   #10
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Yes, many are "enjoying" snow for the first time in 6 years......
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Old March 1, 2018   #11
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And at the north pole Spring has sprung in the dark time while it snows in Rome. A little backwards.
https://www.vox.com/energy-and-envir...h-pole-climate

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Old March 1, 2018   #12
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I predict the earths poles are going to reverse in the future.
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Old March 1, 2018   #13
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Quote:
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I predict the earths poles are going to reverse in the future.
Worth
How else could Stanislaw Jablonski get out of his parking space?
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Old March 1, 2018   #14
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Here is a good article on the pole reversal question.
https://phys.org/news/2017-01-earth-...ap-affect.html

Who knew the earth's core has a jet stream.
One boffin says we may need more fruits and vegetables if the poles reverse. Sounds like this discussion is in the right place.
https://physics.stackexchange.com/qu...om-what-threat

Last edited by bower; March 1, 2018 at 04:28 PM. Reason: add
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Old March 1, 2018   #15
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My early spring will experience a set back this weekend. Down pours, high winds and then snow. Potatoes are at room temp and in the window to green up, and wait for the soil to warm up again.
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