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Old March 3, 2018   #31
mensplace
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https://www.ars.usda.gov/northeast-a...erry-catalogs/
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Old March 3, 2018   #32
clkeiper
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Originally Posted by Black Krim View Post
Sprayless scions fit what I am looking for, so Libery was a possibility, otherwise fireblight has become a problem in recent years. That is when the Geneva stock became more important. The demand for G stock is sky high, and the originator of it has very few cultivars of it available now.
Oxidate 2.0 is labeled for fire blight FYI.
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Old March 3, 2018   #33
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Years ago my father ordered from Stark's before they were bought out.
I remember one apple tree I just had to have.
It was huge and they advertised it as one apple making a whole pie.
They weren't kidding, that thing was huge.

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Old March 3, 2018   #34
Black Krim
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Originally Posted by bower View Post
The list was alphabetical, and all over the USA - so here are some listed in the New England area-ish: I omitted a few with just berry bushes offered. But of course may have changed (if still existing..) Google may get you more about these, or if not try yellow pages for local ones.

Bigelow Nurseries Northboro Mass
Congdon and Weller Nursery Inc North Collins NY
Country Heritage Nursery Hartford Michigan * a lot of large nurseries listed in MI at the time
John Gordon Nursery North Tonawanda NY
Kelly Nurseries Dansville NY
Lennilia Farm Nursery Alburtis PA
Henry Leuthardt Nurseries, Long Island NY
Miller Nursery Canandaigua NY
New York State Fruit Testing, Geneva NY (this described as a nonprofit co-op nursery)
Pikes Peak Nurseries Penn Run PA
FW Schumacher Co. Sandwich MA (tree seed by the pound, I bought from them)
St. Lawrence Nurseries, Potsdam NY
Tripple Brook Farm Southampton MA
Wafler Nurseries Wolcott NY
Weston Nurseries Hopkinton MA
M Worley Nursery York Springs PA

My apple trees came from New Brunswick - Corn hill nursery and at the time offered Antanovka and Beautiful Arcade rootstocks as well as dwarf. Mine were on BA so one day my 'apple bushes' could even produce edible apples. That is iff the snowshoe hare goes into deep decline...
Thank you for a HUGE list. I will search the one by one for sure. Weston Nursery is aobut 45 minutes away. Huge facility--love to see land in use for other than huge houses.
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Old March 3, 2018   #35
Black Krim
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Oxidate 2.0 is labeled for fire blight FYI.
Im lost. Is the fireblight treatment???
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Old March 3, 2018   #36
Black Krim
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Here is a site that looks wonderful. Lot of detail information on the cultivars and sells rootstock.

This section below is the varieties ( apple, pear, etc) with substantial viruss and pest resistance; apples are mostly but not limited to PRI efforts.

https://www.grandpasorchard.com/inde...ro=0&typeID=19
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Old March 3, 2018   #37
Black Krim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Years ago my father ordered from Stark's before they were bought out.
I remember one apple tree I just had to have.
It was huge and they advertised it as one apple making a whole pie.
They weren't kidding, that thing was huge.

Worth

i would love an apple that takes only 2-3 apples to peel, core and slice!

LOL I think they still have it. ( I think it was Millers that was bought out--by stark. THe two owners were friends, probably because of working in the same industry.)

I read that variety description to day.....possible old 2010 Stark catalog...
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Old March 3, 2018   #38
Black Krim
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Originally Posted by mensplace View Post
This is where Dr Cummins spent his career devloping the special Geneva rootstock. His family has a company that as "dad has retired" still carries special rootstock for stoen fruit, pears and apples, as well as grafted varieties for sale. Very limited by this time of year of course.
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Old March 3, 2018   #39
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thankfully we haven't had issues with fire blight but those who have know how disaterous it is. the label is as follows....

"HOW SHOULD OXIDATE 2.0 BE USED?
OxiDate 2.0 kills fungus, bacteria and spores on contact, stopping infection in its tracks. It can be used for:
– Quick knock-down

– Population control

– Resistance management tool

– Foliar spray, pre-plant dip, seed treatment

– Ideal tank mix partner for residual/systemic chemistries (see label for mixing instructions)"

If you already have issues I would say use it as a preventative spray. make sure you remove any infected trees that already are showing signs of it, too. but make sure you read the whole label and use as directed.
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Old March 3, 2018   #40
NewWestGardener
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Very interesting read, thanks everyone for sharing your experience, especially about rootstocks and fireblight. I need to read more. I bought an Orange Poppin grafted on M15 (is there such a thing? Straight from my memory) a few years ago, and it snapped right at grafting joint, I tied it tight back together and supported it with a chair, the top survived. I got a dozen apples last year and really liked the flavour and texture.

I’ve never had sour cherries before, are they strictly for cooking and canning, not for fresh eating?
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Old March 4, 2018   #41
Black Krim
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Personally I like the contrast of the sour cherry with the sweet cherry. Local grocery sells a mix in the frozen section. I alternate sweet sour sweet sour!

IMO the sour fruit has less fruit sugar so to me that is the prefered fruit.


The graft is the weakest part of the tree. Some rootstock have weaker grafts than others and carefull reading of individual rootstock will tell you that--only one of all of them comes to mind,Geneva 30. Otherwise all the dwarfs must be staked. One suggestion is to have the stake be quite high, so perching birds will use the stake and not the whip which could cause the graft to break.

From Univeristy of Pennsylvania:

"Geneva 30 (G.30)
The advantages of this M.7-size rootstock are early production, fewer burr knots, and less suckering. Tests at Rock Springs do indicate that trees on this rootstock come into bearing earlier and produce more fruit than M.7. Unfortunately, questions have arisen about the graft compatibility of this rootstock with Gala. In tests around the country in the NC-140 trials, there have been occasions where Gala/G.30 have snapped off at the bud union during high winds. Therefore, it is recommended that if Gala is propagated on G.30, the trees be supported by two wires, one at approximately 36-40 inches above the ground and a second wire at 8-9 feet. Individual stakes or poles have not been sufficient because they allow excessive twisting of the trees in the wind."

Fireblight is not everywhere. I do know it is in my area. However as most people around here dont have fruit trees perhaps it will NOT arrive. I do have a couple pear trees, and they are still surviving with little care and lots of beating up by chickens. No fireblight on those.

Ceder APple rust is another that must be considered. Because of the wild cedars in the woods the risk is real.
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Old March 4, 2018   #42
Black Krim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
thankfully we haven't had issues with fire blight but those who have know how disaterous it is. the label is as follows....

"HOW SHOULD OXIDATE 2.0 BE USED?
OxiDate 2.0 kills fungus, bacteria and spores on contact, stopping infection in its tracks. It can be used for:
– Quick knock-down

– Population control

– Resistance management tool

– Foliar spray, pre-plant dip, seed treatment

– Ideal tank mix partner for residual/systemic chemistries (see label for mixing instructions)"

If you already have issues I would say use it as a preventative spray. make sure you remove any infected trees that already are showing signs of it, too. but make sure you read the whole label and use as directed.
Sounds like a product to keep on hand just in case!
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Old March 4, 2018   #43
Black Krim
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St Lawrence Nursery rang a bell.
https://stlawrencenurseries.com/page...rmation#apples

It was recommended on a blog by a Vermont hog farmer. Truely one of the best blogs ever. The apple trees were planted as food for the hogs. THese are free range hogs, and he has put years into selecting stock to meet the pasturing requirements. A remarkable farm. The name eludes me.

THis nursery only grafts full size apple trees as , in his words, the vigorous growing of the dwarf types will not harden intime for the north winters.

The nursery changed hands. One of the staff now runs it.
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Old March 4, 2018   #44
Black Krim
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Looked at Weston Nursery. Last visted over 12-14 years ago--pricey then.
http://plants.westonnurseries.com/12...v=7516fd43adaa

This is a semi dwarf listed above based on the mature size of the tree. Interesting that the lifespan is listed at 50 years. THis contradicts my understnading that it is the standards that are long lived, not the dwarfed stock. ORchardist apprently must replace trees on a regular basis. The informaion my simply be a cut and paste data source, applied to all apples regardless of rrootstock. It is rather misleading.

THe variety info is an interesting read. The treees are described based on the ornamental value in the landscape and the high up keep and messiness of fruit mentioned. Just a different take based on use.
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Old March 4, 2018   #45
Black Krim
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Re Miller Nursery, here is the letter to customers informing us of the new ownership, Stark.
https://www.starkbros.com/about/miller-nurseries

My peaches and pears came from Millers.
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