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Old March 11, 2018   #1
rtvvvv
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Default i killed them...but wait.. what's this?

the seeds sprouted and grew well, they were 4-5in. tall nice leaves and strong stems. then i left them un attended/ un watered for a couple days TOTAL destruction all dozen+ plants dead! REALLY DEAD.

they were dead dry and as kind of a joke to my self i watered them. day 1 nothing,
day 2 nothing, day3 nothing, day 4: wow some of the stems moved! (all the leaves still dead) day 6 : there is something green!! new leaves!

It appears they are trying to come back from just the stem. UNBELIEVABLE

!
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Old March 11, 2018   #2
Spike2
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Life will always find a way!!!!
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Old March 11, 2018   #3
bower
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That's great! As a bonus, all their drought-tolerance genes have been activated.
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Old March 11, 2018   #4
killab
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awesome
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Old March 11, 2018   #5
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Good to know, that if they've been killed by drought, try watering them anyway.

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Old March 11, 2018   #6
sdambr
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I would try to cut the top dry parts off, there is still hope.
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Old March 11, 2018   #7
kath
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Do you have more seed? Assuming you do, I'd start over if you haven't already. The reason I say this is because one year when most of my plants that were already in the ground were killed by a freak frost but some sprouted again from stems of plants that looked nearly as dead as yours (although in a different way), BUT they were very slow to come back and never caught up with plants I started again from seed a week later.

Not sure when you safe plant out date for tomatoes is where you are in MI, but tomatoes sown here in PA zone 6B are plenty big to put out mid-May but I can easily hold them until the end of the month.

Anyway, just something to consider, fwiw. Good luck!
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Old March 11, 2018   #8
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kath View Post
Do you have more seed? Assuming you do, I'd start over if you haven't already. The reason I say this is because one year when most of my plants that were already in the ground were killed by a freak frost but some sprouted again from stems of plants that looked nearly as dead as yours (although in a different way), BUT they were very slow to come back and never caught up with plants I started again from seed a week later.

Not sure when you safe plant out date for tomatoes is where you are in MI, but tomatoes sown here in PA zone 6B are plenty big to put out mid-May but I can easily hold them until the end of the month.

Anyway, just something to consider, fwiw. Good luck!
Me too.
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Old March 11, 2018   #9
SpookyShoe
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Default Dead seedlings

Buy the plants from a nursery or big box store.
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Old March 12, 2018   #10
Father'sDaughter
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Default i killed them...but wait.. what's this?

I agree with Kath. You likely have plenty of time to start new seeds and have seedlings ready to go by plant out time if these end up not making it or are severely stunted.

And if these do recover, then you'll have back-ups incase they don't survive for any reason after plant-out. I always keep back-up plants for at least two to three weeks after I plant out, just in case...
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Old March 12, 2018   #11
AlittleSalt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kath View Post
Do you have more seed? Assuming you do, I'd start over if you haven't already. The reason I say this is because one year when most of my plants that were already in the ground were killed by a freak frost but some sprouted again from stems of plants that looked nearly as dead as yours (although in a different way), BUT they were very slow to come back and never caught up with plants I started again from seed a week later.

Not sure when you safe plant out date for tomatoes is where you are in MI, but tomatoes sown here in PA zone 6B are plenty big to put out mid-May but I can easily hold them until the end of the month.

Anyway, just something to consider, fwiw. Good luck!
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Me too.
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Buy the plants from a nursery or big box store.
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Originally Posted by Father'sDaughter View Post
I agree with Kath. You likely have plenty of time to start new seeds and have seedlings ready to go by plant out time if these end up not making it or are severely stunted.

And if these do recover, then you'll have back-ups incase they don't survive for any reason after plant-out. I always keep back-up plants for at least two to three weeks after I plant out, just in case...
I agree. I'm looking at doing something along those same lines tomorrow.
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Old March 12, 2018   #12
kath
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Quote:
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I always keep back-up plants for at least two to three weeks after I plant out, just in case...
Great point - back-up plants are certainly extra work and require more space but ever since I lost over 100 plants in that freeze, I'm never without them. They're easy to give away to friends, family, neighbors, senior centers, etc. I just pot them up to containers that I don't mind not getting back.
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Old March 12, 2018   #13
oakley
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I always start a tray a month early, then another a week or two later, then a third
about the correct time. Insurance. Not only does my plant out time change every year
depending on weather, something just may go wrong in the sprouting and seedling
stage.
My early tray is all saved seed of my top ten so I have plenty and free. Top 13 really....
the bakers dozen. If that tray does well, most go to friends and family as they are
growing in a slightly warmer zone.

I'm not fond of the fiber type starting cell/pots. They dry out in the blink of a eye, especially
since I need to run a fan 24/7 as Spring thaw this time of year is very high in humidity
in my down stairs grow room.
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Old March 12, 2018   #14
chadandpia
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speaking of the fiber type of pots .. this is the first year I've used them .. normally I've used biodome seed starters from Parkseed which uses sponges that you just re-order each year. Well, I was laid off last October after 17 years so was looking at ways to save money and thought seed starting would be one of those areas as I can get a lot of those small fiber pots for 1/3rd of the cost of ordering the sponges.. anyway, I've always bottom watered and was doing the same for these but I've noticed that some of them are starting to develop a white mold around the outside of the pots .. is that normal or something to be concerned about? I never had any issues like that with the biodome sponges....
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Old March 12, 2018   #15
Nan_PA_6b
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White mold on the Peat Pots never seemed to bother mine. Also, sometimes the white roots poke through the pot, don't know if that's something you're seeing.

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