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Old October 18, 2016   #1
Spike2
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Default Apple pie filling, canning, question

So I have canned my own apple pie filling every year for years. A friend of mine was canning her apple pie filling for the first time and asked me how long to blanch her apples. I have never blanched my apples before canning into filling. What are the benefits to blanching first? Have I been doing it wrong?
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Old October 18, 2016   #2
Worth1
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So I have canned my own apple pie filling every year for years. A friend of mine was canning her apple pie filling for the first time and asked me how long to blanch her apples. I have never blanched my apples before canning into filling. What are the benefits to blanching first? Have I been doing it wrong?
No you haven't and I see no reason to blanch something that is already going to be heated up anyway.
I do recommend fruit fresh I swear by the stuff for a fresh clean look when slicing apples and putting them in a bowl of water.
If they do go brown this will clean them right up.
Learned about using this stuff in the Marines of all places.

Worth
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Old October 18, 2016   #3
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I've never canned a fruit besides peaches. Have you ever canned pumpkins for pies and muffins? I have the same question re blanching. It would be interesting to see the difference between canned (a real metal can) and fresh.

I am a sucker for those giant pies at the warehouse store but my waistline says no this year. A small homemade single serving version would be ideal.

- Lisa
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Old October 18, 2016   #4
GrowingCoastal
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When foods are blanched or cooked before canning they can become more concentrated, lose their shape a bit and fit more to a jar.
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Old October 18, 2016   #5
PhilaGardener
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Must involve a pressure cooker. What is your favorite recipe, Spike2 ?
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Old October 18, 2016   #6
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I don't think this is blanching per se. It looks more like heating up briefly (1 min) to get the apples hot, maybe remove some of the air before filling the jars.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_02/can_...e_filling.html
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Old October 18, 2016   #7
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Lisa,

It is considered safe to pressure can pumpkin in chunks. Same thing here, the chunks are heated up briefly before filling the jars. Sugar pie pumpkins and butternut squash make very delicious pies.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/pump...er_squash.html
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Old October 19, 2016   #8
Spike2
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Must involve a pressure cooker. What is your favorite recipe, Spike2 ?
For Apple Pie Filling? I will give you my recipe if that is what you are asking for?
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Old October 19, 2016   #9
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You mean you don't have to cook the apples first??? That would save an awful lot of time...... Getting more into the jar is always good though. I find that canning is a lot of work with a water bath.

Linda
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Old October 19, 2016   #10
coronabarb
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I thought the pressure cooker comment was in response to the pumpkin canning comment.
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Old October 19, 2016   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike2 View Post
For Apple Pie Filling? I will give you my recipe if that is what you are asking for?
Yup, sounded good!
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Old October 20, 2016   #12
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Makes 7 quarts

3 1/2 cups white sugar
1 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cups clear jel
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/4 teaspoons nutmeg
1/4 teaspoons all spice
1/8 teaspoons cloves
2 teaspoons salt
10 cups water
3 Tablespoons lemon juice
6 pounds apples

In a large pan, mix sugar, clear jel, salt and spices. Slowly add water and mix well. Bring to a boil and cook until thick and bubbly.

Fill hot jars with apples, fill jars with hot syrup leaving 1 inch head space, remove any bubbles, process in water bath for 20 minutes.
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Old October 20, 2016   #13
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The way that I do it is to pick a washing-up bowl full of home-grown organic apples, then wash, core, and cut them into slices. Cook them in two large pans (one of which is a pressure cooker, so probably 5 quarts) adding a tiny amount of water so that they don't burn. No peeling, no sugar, no water, nothing.

When cooked, ladle them into 7 quart-sized mason jars and process in the water bath.

Linda
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Old October 20, 2016   #14
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I wonder what a fermented apple would taste like.
Gonna give it a try.

Worth
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Old October 20, 2016   #15
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Apple cider Worth! YUMMY!!! Do watch out for wasps though.....

Linda
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