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Discussion forum for the various methods and structures used for getting an early start on your growing season, extending it for several weeks or even year 'round.

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Old January 27, 2018   #16
BigVanVader
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Aluminet is def better, I just couldn't pull the trigger last year. This year I likely will.
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Old January 28, 2018   #17
Black Krim
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@BigVanVader--

is the 50% shade cloth covering the S side??? I don't see any trees or bulldings to block sunlight on the far side so me thinks perhaps your GH is like my house where I receive MORE sunlight (reflected) into my house on the N side than the S that is crowded with oaks/maples/beech/etc that block most of the sunlight May to October.
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Old January 29, 2018   #18
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It is facing west, so sun is shining on that side from about 10 am till dark. Sun rises right behind my GH so only a couple of hours shine on the east side.
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Old January 29, 2018   #19
Black Krim
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Gotcha. Is it a regional thing how a GH is oriented?? Somehow I thought all GH ran E-W....
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Old January 29, 2018   #20
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Idk, I just put mine in the best spot on my property for all day sun. I could orient one perpendicular to the south and make it work, bur it's not ideal.
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Old January 29, 2018   #21
Black Krim
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Im sure terrain, slope and spacing plays a role.
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Old January 30, 2018   #22
My Foot Smells
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigVanVader View Post
Aluminet is def better, I just couldn't pull the trigger last year. This year I likely will.
the rats used my aluminet to make nests or something - ate it up. careful w/ winter storage. they didn't mess with my shadecloth stash, I don't know why they went for the aluminet.......
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Old February 4, 2018   #23
FourOaks
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I realize this is an older thread... has anyone tried or considered a "Swamp Cooler"?

Something I struggle with myself is heat build up. I need to purchase some shade cloth. Or do something.
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Old February 5, 2018   #24
Worth1
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I realize this is an older thread... has anyone tried or considered a "Swamp Cooler"?

Something I struggle with myself is heat build up. I need to purchase some shade cloth. Or do something.
Swamp coolers / evaporative coolers work well for arid climates where the air isn't saturated with moisture / high humidity.

In the summer time here when the humidity is really low I can spray the concrete drive down with a big fan on it.
I get really cold air coming off the fan.
Another place I like to do it is my golden goddess bamboo grove.
Feels like a refrigerator door opened.

Worth
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Old February 5, 2018   #25
FourOaks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Swamp coolers / evaporative coolers work well for arid climates where the air isn't saturated with moisture / high humidity.

In the summer time here when the humidity is really low I can spray the concrete drive down with a big fan on it.
I get really cold air coming off the fan.
Another place I like to do it is my golden goddess bamboo grove.
Feels like a refrigerator door opened.

Worth
I understand what your saying, and honestly always thought there was no hope for humid areas.

I forgot to post this UMASS study:

https://ag.umass.edu/greenhouse-flor...ooling-systems

They indicate, that even upwards of 70% humidity, you could have around 10 degrees of cooling.

One thing I have learned in a few years of Greenhouse/High Tunnel growing, ANY cooling is still cooling.... Combined with a shade cloth, and this could be interesting.
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Old February 5, 2018   #26
Worth1
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60% humidity and below will dry peppers.
Where I live it can get up close to 100% sometimes.
Depending on which way the wind is coming from.
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