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Old February 16, 2018   #1
mensplace
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Default new to peppers and overwhelmed

SO many names and so many varieties. I just want a few...as in very few...seeds of a few varieties for sautéing and stuffing..NOT hot, and NOT bitter, but large enough to go with eggplant or be stuffed...that's the limit of my knowledge of uses except in salsa.

So far, with just my meager efforts, I have identified Carmen sweet, giant Marconi, big bertha, shishoto , Anaheim , and poblano. I just hate bitterness and the wife will not eat them hot.

Have I come close. I love it when they are sweet, and hate it when they are bitter, like most of the plants of bells you find in the big box stores.

If I could find a source where you could purchase fewer seeds, that would be ideal.

Guidance appreciated as I just want a few of each. Wish they could adopt a standard in naming as they all seem so similar like the Hatch, Numex, and Anaheim....and then you get into fresh or roasted.

I just want to start a few seeds for cooking ...which is either sautéed, with Eggplant, or mild salsa. Preferably those that will stand up to conditions in GA. Thanks
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Old February 16, 2018   #2
roper2008
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Pinetree seeds is the only one I know of that you can buy fewer seeds for a
lower price.

If you want I can send you some seeds of Ajvarski. Never grown them but good
reviews from Baker Creek. I also have Jimmy Nardello, very sweet, and good for
sauteing, but not stuffing. Red Lamuya, I can share too, never tried it, bought from
Marianna's. LMK

As far as your list. I have grown Carmen F1. Very good pepper and very sweet when
red. Big Bertha F1 I have grown also. Makes very large longer type bells. Giant Marconi is good too, takes awhile to turn red though.

Oh, I forgot, The Sample Seed Shop is good to order from too.
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Old February 16, 2018   #3
beasl004
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I grew Ajvarski last year and it was our favorite. It's a really good sweet pepper, highly recommended.
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Old February 16, 2018   #4
SQWIBB
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Anaheim and Poblanos are hot, I love poblanos.
I have been searching for a thick walled thin skinned pepper that cooks, freezes then thaws well in stuff like stews and such
So far my favorites have been Corno Di Toro Giallo, Ruby Red and California Wonder.

Aquaponics Ruby Red


Corno Di Toro Giallo]





California Wonder


My 2018 list of new peppers
  • Pepper, Sweet - Corno di Toro Rosso Pepper (Red) [HEIRLOOM] - 7-8 weeks February 24th
  • Pepper, Sweet - Ruby King - 7-8 weeks-February 26thHarvest seeds from 2017
  • Pepper, Sweet - Red Marconi [HEIRLOOM] - 7-8 weeks-February 24th
  • Pepper, Sweet - Giant Marconi[Hybrid ] - 7-8 weeks-February 24th
  • Pepper, Sweet - Emerald Giant Bell[HEIRLOOM] - 7-8-weeks February 24th
  • Pepper, Sweet - Jimmy Nardello [HEIRLOOM ] - 7-8 weeks-February 24th
  • Pepper, Sweet - Acongagua [HEIRLOOM]- 7-8 weeks-February 24th
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Old February 16, 2018   #5
oakley
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Gorgeous peppers SQUIBB.

If you find a few you might like by description, taste and size, post in the
'seeds wanted' section and I'm sure someone will have seeds for you.

Sample seed has a few that look like what you want. http://www.sampleseeds.com/?page_id=2797
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Old February 16, 2018   #6
mensplace
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Sqwibb......
Absolutely gorgeous pictures and peppers
I should be so lucky!
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Old February 16, 2018   #7
mikemansker
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I have some Giant Marconi seeds I'd be glad to send. PM your address and I'll get them to you. They did well for me in southern Missouri. I imagine they would like Georgia heat just fine.
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Old February 16, 2018   #8
Locomatto
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I grew Beaver Dam peppers last year and found them very well suited for stuffing. They have a thin'ish wall so they cook all the way through well without being so thin that they break apart in the pan. I LOVE Giant Marconi's but they are a thick-walled pepper, so I don't know if you'd want to stuff them (unless you go with oven roasting). We used them in salsa last year and I only regret that we didn't grow more.

I've never experienced bitterness in peppers, so I'm guessing that it's a difference in our taste buds. For me, I found the Beaver Dam to be slightly fruity, especially when ripened all the way to red, while being rather mild flavored overall. The Giant Marconi had a stronger flavor than the Beaver Dam, with "smoky/earthy" being the best way that I can describe it. My wife once called the Marconi flavor as "everything that a bell should be, and isn't".

As for heat levels, the Giant Marconi has absolutely zero heat, and I would rate the Beaver Dam as "pleasantly spicy" for most people. However, someone with a very sensitive pallet (like my daughter) may find them too strong.


Hopefully all that helped somewhat, and if you want to give Beaver Dam peppers a try, PM me and I will send you some seeds.
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Old February 16, 2018   #9
Worth1
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Ghost pepper is the only one you need.

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Old February 16, 2018   #10
mensplace
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Ghost pepper is the only one you need.

Worth
Do people really eat that? I already live in pain 24/7
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Old February 16, 2018   #11
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensplace View Post
Do people really eat that? I already live in pain 24/7
I do but not whole.
I like them because a wee bit makes things as hot as you want without ruing the flavor of some foods.

Take a tomato based salsa made with your favorite tomato.
You wouldn't want to overpower the tomato taste with weak peppers.
Maybe a drop of my fermented ghost pepper sauce is all you need but it is your choice.

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Old February 16, 2018   #12
FourOaks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Ghost pepper is the only one you need.

Worth
C'mon be a man and get ya some liquid capsaicin.

I only jest of course. Few years back I grew out a Trinidad Scorpion. Put a sliver in my mouth and it went numb.

I have no idea why people eat the stuff.
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Old February 16, 2018   #13
nyrfan
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The Pepper Gal is a good source. Prices are $2 to $3 per packet.

Pimento-types are sweet & good for stuffing.
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Old February 17, 2018   #14
Black Krim
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I'm still new to peppers, 2 seasons under my belt, mostly failures....

But I do like to eat the. But not the green. One bite is enough unless covered with salad dressing.

Reds and orange and yellows have a different flavor. My selections this year are based on a variety grown for good color.

I look at TomatoGrowers for a list that separates hot peppers from sweet peppers. With photos. Kind of an encyclopedia. ( I have oredered tomato seeds from this source.)

I also look for the words "thick walled", too.

Last edited by Black Krim; February 17, 2018 at 09:17 AM.
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Old May 21, 2018   #15
Togo77
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I have 6 beautiful bell pepper plants in containers. Probably 3 feet tall. I noticed I had only one decent sized pepper growing on all these plants. They are loaded with blooms and tiny peppers. I noticed the little peppers are turning yellow and dropping off the plants rather than maturing.
We have been having rather unusual weather this year. The nights didn’t want to warm above 60 until maybe the last week in April and the last few weeks days have been above 90.
The peppers are watered every other day on drip irrigation. I feed them once a week with Texas tomato food. My tomatoes are going crazy. Unbelievable how well my tomatoes are doing.
Not sure what to think of my peppers failure to set fruit.
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