Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 27, 2018   #1
TC_Manhattan
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 404
Default Earth Box Roots

Last summer was the first year I grew tomatoes and peppers in my earth boxes.

Before this, I used them for beans, peas, and kale, and their roots would disappear from the earth box mix over winter, so it was easy to add new fertilizer and re-use them the following year.

Now I have these boxes that seem to have their root balls still very much present in the soil(less) mix. Do I need to remove them, or can I just pretend they are not there and plant new seedlings anyways? Not sure how to navigate new fertilizer around them, since the roots act to bind everything together in a cohesive mass.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I'd hate to have to empty them and use new Pro-Mix every year. $$.

Thanks in advance!
TC_Manhattan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2018   #2
ginger2778
Florida TAG™ Coordinator
 
ginger2778's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Plantation, Florida zone 10
Posts: 8,600
Default

No need to throw out,it just turns into organic food for the new plants. Just remove any remnants of the main woody stem. It's weird that you still have roots, mine are always gone by the end of the summer, but that is my high heat solarizing period, so maybe that does it.
__________________
Marsha

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.”
― Neil deGrasse Tyson

#metoo

“When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time”. Maya Angelou
ginger2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2018   #3
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 33,836
Default

Any dead root is a good root.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
If Count Dracula grow tomatoes they would be black tomatoes.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2018   #4
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 33,836
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Any dead root is a good root.
Well unless it has a nematode hotel in it.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
If Count Dracula grow tomatoes they would be black tomatoes.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28, 2018   #5
TC_Manhattan
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 404
Default

Thanks for your thoughts.

Around here, we get subzero temps. over the winter latent period, and not much happens by way of decay, as the contents of the above-ground containers freeze solid long before the in-ground soil does. I pull intact root balls out of my garden beds in early spring as I clear out for the new season, so I can work in some more Plant Tone before the new crop.

Maybe I can use a steak knife to carve out a hole for the seedling plugs. Leave it up to them to work around the remaining tangles. I'm not kidding, I can pull the entire content of the earth box out as one big loaf because the roots hold it all together so.

Never had that problem with beans or peas or leafy veg.
TC_Manhattan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28, 2018   #6
ginger2778
Florida TAG™ Coordinator
 
ginger2778's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Plantation, Florida zone 10
Posts: 8,600
Default

Wow, that's amazing!
__________________
Marsha

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.”
― Neil deGrasse Tyson

#metoo

“When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time”. Maya Angelou
ginger2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 3, 2018   #7
edweather
Tomatovillian™
 
edweather's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Southeast GA Zone 9a
Posts: 254
Default

I hear what you're saying about the roots binding up the whole container. My container mix is a bit different, but in the spring I dump out the loaf and kind of mash it up a bit, and some of the roots can be removed. I hate to just plant in root filled material, so I try and re-sift the roots out the best I can.
__________________
You'll be surprised what you never have to do if you put it off long enough.
edweather is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 3, 2018   #8
PotGarden
Tomatovillian™
 
PotGarden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: NY
Posts: 59
Default

I do the same thing as edweather. I get a large sharp carving knife from the kitchen, yank the whole thing out, shake as much soil off the root ball as I can, cut out the large pieces of roots, cut up and put the smaller ones back in the bottom of the box, cover with soil and maybe put in just a few handfuls of new soil to fill it up. If you chop up some of the roots of helps create more surface area for microorganisms to work on breaking them down.
PotGarden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 4, 2018   #9
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 33,836
Default

My big tub containers all the roots were gone I just flipped the soil by hand.
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
If Count Dracula grow tomatoes they would be black tomatoes.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:07 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★